s

La Lupe

A Lady And Her Music Puro Teatro

$1.50

La Lupe

A Lady And Her Music Puro Teatro

$54.45 Album
Con el Diablo en el Cuerpo
Fiebre
Alma Llanera
No Quiero Mas
Que Te Pedi
Bomba Na'Ma'
Elube Chango
Lola
Pajarillo
Viva Mi Tristeza
Los Carreteros
Jugando Mama, Jugando
Amor Ciego
Oriente
Jala-Jala Panameno: Si Me Quereis/El Tambor de la Alegra
El Amo
Golpe Tocuyano
Canto a Caracas
Barlovento
El Carbonero
America
El Cascabel
Si Vuelves Tu
Que Bueno Boogaloo
Te Voy a Contar Mi Vida
La Tirana
Fever
Este Ritmo Sabroson
Bembe Pata Pata
Guantanamera a la Virgen de Guadalupe
Carcajada Final
Me Siento Guajira
That's The Way It's Gonna Be
Puro Teatro
Fijense
Toitica Tuya
Saraycoco
Bring It On Home to Me
Once We Loved(Se Acabo)
Como Acostumbro
Por Caridad
Chumba la Chumba
El Malo
Ingrato Corazon
Cubana Caliente
Vagabundo
Puedes Decir de Mi
Lo Que Paso Paso
Palo Mayimbe
Juan Manuel
La Mala de la Película
Eres Malo y Te Amo
Changó
Porque Asi Es Que Tenia Que Ser
Amor Verdadero
La Lupe Puro Teatro – A Lady And Her Music Liner notes by Matt Rogers “I think people like me,” the legendary La Lupe told Look magazine in 1971, “because I do what they’d like to but can’t get free enough to do.” True, some would say La Yi Yi Yi—one of the most electrifying singers to ever blitz Planet Earth—was free spirit incarnate; others would say she was simply possessed. Literally. No surprise, given the voluptuous vocalist’s onstage inclination to bounce off walls, tear away her clothes, throw shoes and jewelry at her band, and claw, bite, and scratch herself, all the while continually belting tunes with orgasmic heat, all as if in a trance. “I sing with delirium!” she once sang, and she did, turning each song into a full-fledged drama. Some criticized her for dressing like a streetwalker, while others embraced her bold sexuality. Her performances onstage and on wax reflected her tumultuous life offstage and were indeed—like the name of one of her most famous songs—puro teatro. A melting pot of Edith Piaf, Eartha Kitt, Olga Guillot, Tina Turner, and Nina Simone, the singer’s tempestuously elastic voice could both coddle and torch any genre. Whether interpreting boleros or son montunos, pop schlock or rock-and-roll ditties, jazz standards or Broadway show tunes, La Lupe simply couldn’t contain the music within herself. And no one—be it Fidel Castro, Mongo Santamaria, Tito Puente, or Morris Levy—could ever, no matter how hard they tried, contain her philharmonic energy. She was a wrenching tug-of-war between impulse and craft, be her platform the street, club, or recital hall. Such grand musical drama took her around the world and reportedly drew international celebs and sophisticates like Marlon Brando, Ernest Hemingway, Simone de Beauvoir, Tennessee Williams, Picasso, and Jean-Paul Sartre into her court, but anyone who ever bore witness—from riffraff to royalty, young and old, whether in her native Cuba, the USA, or Latin America—never forgot her. Or did they? Many thousands came to her shows—from Birdland to the Palladium, Carnegie Hall to Madison Square Garden—and millions of fans bought her LPs, while millions more saw her on TV. Yet, despite the renown and being crowned the “Queen of Latin Soul,” despite recording a dynamic slew of two dozen albums, one of the twentieth century’s most charismatic entertainers died a pauper’s death. Once upon a time, long before popular TV host Mike Douglas introduced her as a legend whose style was “sex, fire, soul, and voodoo,” long before Look magazine stated that “she makes Jane Birkin sound like a puppy,” long before she became associated with drag queens and drugs, and before one Cuban publication declared her “a psy- chosomatic case that divides Cuba in two,” and most definitely pop culture eons before today’s masses went all ga-ga-goo-goo for La Lupe’s lineage, Lady Gaga, La Lupe was born Lupe (though some sources say Guadalupe) Victoria Yoli Raymond in San Pedrito, a town in the southern part of Cuba near Santiago de Cuba. There seems to be an agree- ment about the day of La Lupe’s birth—December 23—however, perhaps befitting such a controversial figure, the actual year of her birth appears to be up for debate, as most sources say either 1936 or 1939. Archival footage from La Lupe’s funeral shows 1936 as the date given on her casket, while her tombstone at St. Raymond’s Cemetery in the Bronx gives her birth year as 1939. So rural was her hometown that she once remarked, “I was born in such a small town, nobody knew about it until I left.” In Ela Troyano’s excellent PBS documentary La Lupe – Queen of Latin Soul, Norma Yoli, Lupe’s sister, described her as “just another Black girl that no one paid attention to [who] loved to get in the conga [line] and dance.” Moreover, a young Lupe was inspired to sing after seeing a TV performance by Edith Piaf. Despite clearly being attracted to music at a young age, however, Lupe’s parents insisted that their daughter pursue a more stable profession—that of a schoolteacher—and she followed their wishes, though her burgeoning passion was difficult to resist, particularly after the family moved north to Havana when La Lupe was a teenager, where she would study by day and begin to sing by night.After Lupe won a contest singing like the well-known Cuban bolero singer Olga Guil- lot, Guillot encouraged her to cultivate her own style, which she set out to do amidst Havana’s sea of nightclubs. “La Lupe’s Havana, [from 1957 to ’60] had the biggest night life in the world,” says Cuban musicologist Helio Orovio in Troyano’s film. “Lupe was a phenomenon of the times, and it was a crazy time... La Lupe absorbed all of that and threw it back out.” Indeed, pre-Castro Havana’s nocturnal party scene was infamous for its creativity and excess, and La Lupe soon found herself a part of a trio called Tropicuba, a group that would give the singer her first taste of professional popularity, as well as her first husband. After her husband cheated with Tropicuba’s other member, the turbulent marriage—and the group—would not last and would mark the beginning of a serial run of abusive relationships for La Lupe, relationships many believed would fuel her fiery onstage persona throughout her career. So Lupe embarked on her own, landing a gig at a club called La Red, and built a steady following performing seven shows a night for $28 a week. “She did things, and if the audience liked it, then she’d repeat it,” her pianist at that time, Homero Balboa, recalled in Troyano’s documentary. “If she’d hit me on the head with a shoe and they laughed, she’d hit me every day... At that time, we had the hippies and the existential- ists. It was an audience that was receptive to her immediately. People who wore their shirts backwards, that was her audience.” Her fellow musicians weren’t the only ones taking such abuse, however, as La Lupe would pull her own hair, bite herself, and flail across the stage. “She used to tear her dress. She took her breast out of her dress and banged it against the microphone,” remembered one La Red patron in a 1969 New York magazine article. “She was very feminine and macho all at once—aggressive, irreverent,” adds musicologist Orovio in Troyano’s film. “She was a kind of anticipated rapper... She’d talk, scream, she’d hit the wall, and the music kept going. The music went one way, and she’d go another. But all that incoherence would click.” In 1960, it would click enough for the then twenty-year-old (or twenty-three) to land a record deal with the RCA affiliate Discuba Records. The two LPs, Con el Diablo en el Cuerpo (“With the Devil in the Body”) and La Lupe Is Back, would more or less establish the musical blueprint she’d stick to throughout her Spanglish-ized singing career, mash- ing extravagantly arranged pop standards like “Fever” (“Fiebre”) with raw indigenous jams. And though her debut LP was presumably named after the ecstatic Julio Gutiérrez- penned title track and not (necessarily) after La Lupe’s own penchant for onstage “pos- session,” a purchasing public couldn’t be faulted if, after taking one look at the album’s front and back images of a woman clearly transfixed, they thought perhaps the Devil lurked somewhere within the vinyl’s grooves. But just as Lupe was starting to revolution- ize what a female (let alone a Black) singer could do, her rising star was eclipsed by an even more ascendant force, one deemed by some the ultimate savior, and others, the ultimate diablo. “[Fidel Castro] says I was taking attention away from his revolution, and he says I must leave,” Lupe told Rolling Stone in 1972. “When you have a revolution, you cannot afford to have someone like [Beny Moré] or myself around. We take all attention away from it. I’m for everybody, I’m not limited by revolutions, I’m for everybody that got soul!” Thus, in 1962, Lupe took her soul northward, first to Mexico, then Miami, then headed for the Big Apple, where she unceremoniously found herself scraping for gigs along with every other wannabe looking for that big break. Fortunately for Lupe, her big break came via a fellow expat known for creating torrid breakbeats with his hands. “She was famous in Cuba, but that didn’t matter here,” the late, great Mongo Santamaria recalled in Troyano’s documentary. “She had nothing, nothing, nothing. Wherever I went, she came with me; she knew the songs I was playing. There’s a part in ‘Watermelon Man’ where she screamed and did those jokes of hers. The promoter says, ‘Mongo, if this woman is going to keep going, let’s put a mic on her.’ I said, ‘I’m not kicking her out. Put a mic on her.’” Hence, within a short amount of time, La Lupe had not only found herself a popular band, but had found her ecstatic voice on Mongo’s biggest career hit, a boogaloo-driven cover of Herbie Hancock’s “Watermelon Man,” for Riverside Records, a success that would quickly lead to her own stateside semi-debut, Mongo Intro- duces La Lupe. Released just before Riverside would go bankrupt, its mix of mostly instrumental Latin jazz and Lupe’s peripheral vocals was a soft introduction at best. Nonetheless, it got her picture and name on an LP cover and gave an excuse to tour. “When ‘Watermelon Man’ was hot, we toured the Black theater circuit, starting with the Apollo, and Lupe came along,” recalls Marty Sheller, then a young trumpet player and nascent arranger for Mongo’s band. “Mongo was always extremely popular in New York, and at the Apollo, we’d do a couple of numbers then bring out La Lupe. Now she got so involved, so feverish, that she would bite the side of her hands and hit herself. And when it started to get hot and Mongo would get into his solo, she would stand fifteen yards away and come running, fall down on her knees, and slide right up to the drum while he was playing away. The people loved it! Now, the guys who worked as stagehands at the Apollo had seen so much that nothing much rattled them anymore—she rattled them! The last number she would do was ‘Afro Blue,’ and Mongo’d be playing a solo, and she was in a trance, going crazy, and then she would go stomping off to the side of the stage and the stagehands would hold the curtain back, and you could hear them say, ‘Here comes that crazy bitch! Look out, she’ll hit you!’” Such raw antics served to increase the buzz surrounding La Lupe, enough so that other Latin luminaries began to take notice. “Mongo wanted to really get out of the cuchifrito circuit,” Sheller explains. “So he started to do more jazz gigs, and La Lupe wasn’t really for that kind of thing. She was really starting to get popular. That’s when she hooked up with Puente, and her career went sky-high.” Mongo, who had once been a longtime per- cussive prince in El Rey del Timbal’s orchestra, encouraged Lupe to go. Ironically, Puente had been one of the early doubters of La Lupe’s talent, yet now here he was courting her. “When I first heard her with Mongo, I didn’t go for her style,” Puente told Rolling Stone in 1972. “She called it soul, but I called it screaming. Then one day, I heard this record that Lupe had done, and I was impressed. I thought it might be good to try to work with her, to see if I could develop her. I was the one who got her to sing the first bolero she ever did, ‘Que Te Pedí,’ and it became her first big success.” Tucked away in the middle of side B of Tito and Lupe’s masterful 1965 debut collaboration, Tito Puente Swings – The Exciting Lupe Sings, “Que Te Pedí” was indeed a slow burner, one of three boleros mixed in with Puente’s finely orchestrated signature rumble. Under the guidance of Tico Records’ roster of heavyweight producers, it would become just one of many iconic songs the duo would spawn over a span of the next two years and five LPs. The shine Puente provided was more than enough to catapult Lupe (now a mother) into Latin music’s limelight, capturing the vocal rapture Lupe had been unleashing in front of crowds throughout the previous decade, and refining it with his veteran touch. Not that recording La Lupe, be it a bolero, rumba, or guaguancó, was a breeze. “She was hell on wheels,” says veteran crooner Willie Torres, who provided many a coro for now-classic Tico sessions throughout the ’60s, including Lupe’s. “She always stood everybody on end.” Longtime engineer and producer Fred Weinberg recalled in Troyano’s film the con- stant challenge of capturing Lupe in the studio. “She was like a hurricane coming through the door. I don’t think no two takes with Lupe were the same, so we would grab what we could. She didn’t care if she popped on the microphone or not; [it would] drive Puente crazy. ‘Soy yo!’ she’d say.” “Puente became a mentor to La Lupe,” wrote historian Joe Conzo in a 2004 Times Herald-Record article. “He provided her with an atmosphere where she could express her creativity.” As much as Lupe benefited from Puente’s craft and name, however, he also reaped from Lupe’s shooting star, one that was perhaps now burning too brightly for El Rey’s ego. “She was a singer with the Tito Puente orchestra, and that’s the way Puente liked to have things,” recalled legendary album designer and Latin music personality Izzy Sanabria in Troyano’s documentary. “But when people were coming to see La Lupe backed by the Tito Puente orchestra...that did not sit very well with Tito. She was too much of a star... No Latino entertainer at that time in this genre of music had gotten that kind of exposure.” Hence, Tito showed Lupe the door. Fortunately for her, Morris Levy, Tico Records’ owner, loved both her talent and the money he was making off of her enough to make her a solo act. La Lupe quickly set out to prove to her former boss (and any other doubter) that she was more than able to sell records on her own. The fact that Puente had essentially replaced Lupe with expat compatriot Celia Cruz had to have added fuel to Lupe’s ire, which she vented in lyrics such as, “I gave everything to my little boss Puente / He left with the girl next door and left me all alone / [coro] Tito Puente kicked her out / He threw me out, he threw me out!” Instead of going head-to-head with Celia, however, La Lupe flexed her dynamic muscles, throwing a stylistic curveball for her first solo LP, Y Su Alma Venezolana, and forgoing big band orchestrations for a pared-down acoustic set of catchy Venezuelan numbers. “La Lupe was my favorite,” Izzy Sanabria says from his home in Tampa, Florida. “The difference between Celia and her is that Celia was a lady—great style, great voice. But La Lupe sang from deep within her soul. No other way I can explain it.” From 1966 to 1974, Lupe’s soul would indeed be in full force on a dozen LPs, a run that could have been christened—after her ’68 LP of the same name—La Lupe’s Era. She had become a bankable star on her own charismatic terms, becoming in 1969 the first Latina to headline Carnegie Hall, and commanding up to $10,000 a night. “People like me because I am honest,” La Lupe told New York magazine in 1969. “You can hear my records in all the houses in el barrio. I pray to God that I never lose my honesty.” In addition to selling millions of records, she was invited to play rock festivals with the likes of Iron Butterfly, Jethro Tull, the Supremes, and Ray Charles, angling to appeal to the psychedelic pop crowd, a crowd she hoped might buy her Queen Does Her Own Thing LP, the Harvey Averne–produced, Marty Sheller–arranged take on rock and soul hits. The Village Voice took notice, virtually exclaiming, “She is Janis, Aretha, and Edith Piaf tied into one. She sings ballads like Piaf-plus, and up-tempos like the other two—plus madness... She could make a fortune on the rock scene... La Lupe—she’s devastating, and she seems to be devastating herself... Jim Morrison take note.” Morrison wasn’t around long enough to take note, but TV host Dick Cavett certainly was. “When she got the call to do Dick Cavett,” recalls Marty Sheller, “Lupe said, ‘Marty, I want you to do an arrangement of “Afro Blue” for me.’ Bobby Rosengarden led [the show’s] big band, and Victor Paz was lead trumpet. Now, most American musicians have never played a Latin style 6/8, so it took a few times to get it right. Even though it was rehearsal, Lupe started going into her zone, and the musicians were crackin’ up; they had never seen anything like this. But it was all sounding very good. So it came time to tape the show and she came out. I said, ‘Holy crap, look at what she’s got on!’” “Wow was on many lips,” Cavett recalled of the episode in Troyano’s film, comparing La Lupe’s energetic presence to that of Jimi Hendrix and Fred Astaire. “The audience knew they were onto something different than anything they’d ever seen.” By the time Lupe’d finished her frenetic version of “Afro Blue,” the national television audience had seen more of her popping curves and gold uni-suit than perhaps they had wanted to, not to mention Dick Cavett’s half-naked body dancing beside her. Meanwhile, around the same time La Lupe was causing controversy on mainstream television, Fania Records and their marquee act, the Fania All-Stars, were making a big splash in the Latin market with music they were branding as salsa, and inciting near riots at sold-out venues such as Yankee Stadium. It was a hip, young, more brash Nuyorican spin on Afro-Cuban music that was beginning to revolutionize the Latin music scene in the Big Apple and beyond, and showcased many songs written by Tite Curet Alonso, who had gotten his big break with his first hit, “La Gran Tirana,” on La Lupe’s Queen of Latin Soul years earlier. Though their fiery energies would’ve seemed a natural match, Fania wanted little to do with La Lupe, having already signed their lone significant female act, Celia Cruz, whom they would eventually don the “Queen of Salsa.” For her part, the older Celia seemed to respect her peer. “Lupe is a good interpreter of songs in modern music,” she told Rolling Stone in 1972. “It is not my style, but she is a creator too, and I admire her for that.” Hence, La Lupe’s only all-star turn would come on “Sale el Sol” in 1974 at Carnegie Hall, as part of the Tico-Alegre All-Stars concert, the curtain call for Morris Levy’s fading Latin empire, which would soon be absorbed by Fania’s rapid expanse. And though she continued to release solid product throughout the remainder of the ’70s, La Lupe’s shine began to wane. The 1980s were downright cruel, as rumored drug addiction, money woes, an apartment fire, and a debilitating fall severely stressed the mother of two, forcing her to rely on the mercy of homeless shelters, welfare checks, and fellow musicians. Knowing that the music inside of her wouldn’t let go, she let go of the music, giving up secular performances altogether, while trading in her Santeria beliefs for those Pentecostal. In 1992, when she died in her sleep of a massive heart attack at the age of fifty-six (or fifty-nine), many gathered to mourn one of the greatest performers they had ever seen or heard. And though she had accomplished more than most, there still lingered a feeling that perhaps the controversial icon had failed to reach her God-given potential. She had been a fighter all her life, overcoming racial, political, and personal obstacles along the way. “I’m Black and Cuban, a lot of people don’t like me for this,” she had told Rolling Stone twenty years before her death. “They prejudiced because you Black, they prejudiced because you are fat... There was prejudice in Cuba, but I don’t care. There was prejudice in America when I came here too. I’m still fighting for La Lupe, I’m still fighting... I do soul music because I like it. I’d sing in China as long as the people got soul!” “In Cuba, they called me crazy,” La Lupe would later say. “They didn’t understand me.” The Bronx—where today you’ll find La Lupe Way—most definitely did. “Creo que le gusto a la gente”, le dijo La Lupe a la revista Look en 1971, “porque hago lo que ellos quisieran hacer, pero no hacen porque no son libres”. Es cierto que hay quienes dirían que la Yi Yi Yi—una de las cantantes más electrizantes que jamás hayan fulmi- nado por el Planeta Tierra—era la pura encarnación del espíritu libre; y otros dirían que simplemente estaba poseída. Literalmente. No sorprendería a nadie si lo estuviera, dada la tendencia de esta vocalista voluptuosa de tirarse contra las paredes en el escenario, arrancarse la ropa, tirarles sus zapatos y sus joyas a los músicos de su grupo, arañarse y rasgarse a sí misma, y todo esto mientras orgásmicamente cantaba a toda voz, como si estuviera en un trance. “¡Yo canto con delirio!” cantó una vez, y así lo hizo, convirtiendo cada canción en un drama total. Algunos la criticaron por vestirse como una prostituta, mientras otros abrazaron su evidente sexualidad. Sus presentaciones en el escenario y grabaciones en discos reflejaban su tumultuosa vida personal y fueron, de hecho—al igual que el nombre de una de sus canciones más famosas—puro teatro. Un crisol de Eartha Kitt, Edith Piaf, Olga Guillot, y Nina Simone, la voz tempestuosa- mente elástica de la cantante podía a la vez mimar e incinerar a cualquier género. Ya fuera interpretando boleros o sones montunos, canciones pop o cantinelas del rock-and-roll, clásicos del jazz o números de Broadway, La Lupe simplemente no podía contener la música dentro de sí misma, y nadie—sea Fidel Castro, Mongo Santamaría, Tito Puente, o Morris Levy—jamás podría, sin importar lo mucho que intentara, domar su energía filarmónica. Era un desgarrador juego entre el impulso y la artesanía, fuese su plataforma la calle, el club, o la sala de conciertos. El drama musical de tal nivel le permitió viajar el mundo y, según informes, atrajo a celebridades internacionales y sofisticadas como Marlon Brando, Ernest Hemingway, Simone de Beauvoir, Tennessee Williams, Picasso, La Lupe in a Recording session for the album Stop I’m Free Again, 1972. Courtesy of Izzy Sanabria’s Archive. y Jean-Paul Sartre a su cortejo, pero todos aquellos que la vieron en persona—desde la gentuza hasta la realeza, jóvenes o viejos, ya fuese en su Cuba natal, en los Estados Unidos o en América Latina—no eran capaces de olvidarla. ¿O lo fueron? Miles asistieron a sus shows—desde el Birdland hasta el Palladium, de Carnegie Hall a Madison Square Garden—y millones de fanáticos compraron sus discos; millones más la vieron en la tele- visión. Pero sin embargo, a pesar del renombre y de haber sido coronada la “Reina del Soul Latino”, y a pesar de haber grabado dos docenas de dinámicos álbumes, una de las artistas más carismáticas del siglo XX murió como una mendiga. Érase una vez, mucho antes de que el popular anfitrión de televisión Mike Douglas la presentara como una leyenda cuyo estilo era “sexo, fuego, soul, y vudú, mucho antes de que la revista Look declarase que “comparada con ella, Jane Birkin suena como una perrita”, mucho antes de que se le asociara con drag queens y drogas, y antes de que una publicación cubana declarase que ella era “un caso psicosomático que divide a Cuba en dos”, y definitivamente eones de cultura popular antes de que las masas se volvieran locas por el linaje de La Lupe (Lady Gaga), La Lupe, cuyo nombre verdadero era Lupe (aunque hay quienes dice que fue Guadalupe) Victoria Yoli Raymond, nació en San Pedrito, un pueblo en la parte sur de Cuba, cerca de Santiago de Cuba. Parece que se ha llegado a un acuerdo sobre el día de nacimiento de La Lupe—el 23 de diciembre—sin embargo, quizás de manera digna de una figura tan controversial, el año específico de su nacimiento parece ser tema debatido. La mayoría de las fuentes dicen que es 1936 o 1939. Metraje de archivo del funeral de La Lupe muestra el año 1936 como la fecha anotada en su ataúd, mientras la lápida de La Lupe en el cementerio St. Raymond en el Bronx cita el 1939 como el año de su nacimiento. Su pueblo natal era tan rural que ella comentó, “Nací en un pueblo tan pequeño que nadie lo conocía hasta que yo me fui”. En el excelente documental de Ela Troyano para PBS, La Lupe – Queen of Latin Soul, Norma Yoli, la hermana de Lupe, la describe como “simplemente otra niña negra a la que nadie prestaba atención y a quien le encantaba meterse en la [fila de] conga y bailar”. Por otra parte, la joven Lupe se inspiró a cantar tras ver una presentación en televisión de Edith Piaf. Aunque la música le atrajo desde tem- prana edad, los padres de Lupe le insistieron que ejerciera una profesión más estable—la de maestra—y obedeció sus deseos, aunque le resultó difícil resistir su burbujeante pa- sión, especialmente cuando su familia se mudó a La Habana cuando La Lupe era una adolescente. Allí estudiaba por el día y comenzaba a cantar por las noches. Tras ganar un concurso cantando como la conocida cantante de boleros Olga Guillot, Guillot la animó a cultivar su propio estilo, lo cual se propuso hacer dentro del mundo de los clubes nocturnos de la Habana. “La Habana de La Lupe [del 1957 al ’60] contaba con el ambiente nocturno más grande del mundo”, dice el musicólogo cubano Helio Orovio en la película de Troyano. “Lupe era un fenómeno de su época, y era una época de locura... La Lupe absorbió todo aquello y lo lanzó hacia afuera”. De hecho, el ambi- ente de fiesta nocturno de la Habana antes de Castro fue infame por su creatividad y exceso, y pronto La Lupe llegó a formar parte de un trío llamado Tropicuba, un grupo que le brindaría a la cantante su primer gustazo de popularidad profesional, además de su primer esposo. Luego de que su marido la engañara con la otra integrante de Tropicuba, el turbulento matrimonio—y el grupo—no duraría más y ello marcaría el comienzo de una serie de relaciones abusivas para La Lupe, relaciones que muchos creyeron ser el com- bustible de su candente personalidad en el escenario a través de su carrera. Así es que La Lupe se lanzó al mundo sola, consiguiendo presentarse en un club llamado La Red, y acumuló un grupo de leales seguidores presentándose siete veces cada noche por $28 a la semana. “Ella hacía algo, y si al público le gustaba, lo repetía”, recordó en el documental de Troyano Homero Balboa, su pianista en aquel momento. “Si me pegaba en la cabeza con un zapato y se reían, me pegaba todas los días... En aquel entonces teníamos a los hippies y a los existencialistas. Y ese público la acogió inmediata- mente. La gente que se ponía la camisa al revés, esa era su audiencia”. Sin embargo, sus compañeros músicos no eran los únicos que soportaban tales abusos, ya que La Lupe se arrancaba el pelo, se mordía, y se flagelaba por todo el escenario. “Se rasgaba el vestido. Se sacaba un seno del vestido y lo golpeaba contra el micrófono”, recordó un cliente de La Red en un artículo en la revista New York en 1969. “Ella era muy femenina y macha a la misma vez—agresiva, irreverente”, añade el musicólogo Orivio en la película de Troyano. “Ella fue como un tipo de antecedente a los raperos... Hablaba, gritaba, se lanzaba contra la pared, y la música seguía tocando. La música seguía en una dirección y ella en otra. Pero toda esa incoherencia tenía sentido”. En 1960, tendría tanto sentido que a los 22 (ó 23) años firmaría un contrato con la disquera afiliada de RCA, Dis- cuba Records. Los dos LPs, Con el Diablo en el Cuerpo y La Lupe Is Back, establecerían más o menos el esquema musical que seguiría a través de su carrera cantando en “spanglish”, el cual mezclaba conocidas canciones pop como “Fiebre” (“Fever”) con crudas descargas indíge- nas. Y aunque su primer LP fue probablemente titulado así por el extático tema principal escrito por Julio Gutiérrez, y no (necesariamente) por la tendencia de La Lupe de aparentar estar “poseída” en el escenario, no se podía culpar al público consumidor si, luego de ver en ambos lados del álbum las imágenes de la mujer claramente transfigurada, quizás pensaron que el diablo se escondía en las ranuras de vinilo del disco. Pero justo cuando La Lupe comenzaba a revolucionar lo que podía lograr una cantante femenina (y para colmo, negra), su estrella fue eclipsada por una fuerza aún más poderosa, a quien algunos miraban como el salvador, y otros como el diablo supremo. “[Fidel Castro] dijo que yo le estaba robando atención a su revolución, y dijo que me tenía que ir”, le dijo La Lupe a Rolling Stone en 1972. “Cuando hay revolución, no puede andar por ahí alguien como [Beny Moré] o como yo. Le quitamos toda la atención. Yo existo para todos, no me limitan las revoluciones, ¡soy para todo el que tenga soul!” Y así, en 1962, La Lupe se llevó su soul rumbo al norte, primero a México, luego a Miami, y luego a la Gran Manzana, donde se halló sin pompa ni circunstancia rogando por la oportunidad de presentarse junto a todos los otros desconocidos que también esperaban su gran oportuni- dad. Por suerte para La Lupe, su gran oportunidad se presentó vía un compatriota exilado conocido por los tórridos ritmos que creaba con sus manos. “Ella era famosa en Cuba, pero eso no importaba aquí”, recordó el ahora fallecido Mongo Santamaría en el documental de Troyano. “No tenía nada, nada, nada. Donde yo iba, ella venía conmigo; se sabía todas las canciones que yo tocaba. Hay una parte de ‘Watermelon Man’ en donde ella grita y cuenta esos chistes suyos. Y el promotor me dice, ‘Mongo, si esta mujer va a seguir con esto, va- mos a ponerle un micrófono’. Yo le dije, ‘Yo no la voy a echar de aquí. Ponle un micrófono’”. Fue así como en muy corto tiempo La Lupe no sólo se convirtió en parte de una banda popular, sino que su voz extática formaba parte del hit más grande de la carrera de Mongo, una cubierta estilo boogaloo de “Watermelon Man”, de Herbie Hancock para Riverside Records y un éxito que la llevaría a estrenar su propio “semidebut” en los Estados Unidos, Mongo Introduces La Lupe. Lanzado justo antes de que Riverside se fuera a la quiebra, su mezcla de jazz latino, mayormente instrumental, y las vocalizaciones al margen de Lupe resultaron, en el mejor de los casos, en un lanzamiento suave. No obstante, su foto y su nombre terminaron en la portada de un LP y le dieron una excusa para irse de gira. “Cuando ‘Watermelon Man’ estaba caliente, recorrimos el circuito teatral negro, co- menzando con el Apollo, y La Lupe vino con nosotros”, recuerda Marty Sheller, entonces un joven trompetista y naciente arreglista para la banda de Mongo. “Mongo siempre fue extremadamente popular en Nueva York, y en el Apollo tocábamos un par de números y sacábamos a La Lupe. Entonces se involucraba tanto en el acto, se ponía tan febril, que se mordía los costados de las manos y se pegaba. Y cuando la cosa se ponía caliente y Mongo se adentraba en su solo, ella se paraba como a 15 metros y salía corriendo, caía de rodillas y se deslizaba hasta llegar a las congas mientras Mongo seguía tocando. ¡A la gente le encantaba! Ahora bien, los muchachos que trabajaban como tramoyistas en el Apollo habían presenciado tanto ya que nada los sacudía—¡y ella los sacudió! El último número que interpretaba era ‘Afro Blue’, y ahí estaba Mongo tocando su solo, y ella es- taba en su trance, como una loca, y se iba pisoteando hacia un lado del escenario y los tramoyistas aguantaban el telón, y se les podía escuchar diciendo, “¡Ahí viene esa tipa loca! ¡Cuidado, que te pega!” Tales locuras salvajes sirvieron para aumentar el número de historias y la cobertura que rodeaban a La Lupe, de manera que otras estrellas latinas comenzaron a prestar atención. “Mongo quería salir del circuito de los ‘cuchifritos’”, explica Sheller. “Así que empezó a presentar más jazz, y a La Lupe no le interesaba eso. Ella ya comenzaba a adquirir populari- dad. Entonces fue cuando se unió a Puente, y su carrera se lanzó a la estratosfera”. Mongo, quien había sido por mucho tiempo un príncipe de la percusión en la orquesta del Rey del Timbal, le aconsejó a Lupe que se fuera. Irónicamente, Puente había sido uno de los que La Lupe in Cuba at Club La Red, El Vedado, 1959. Courtesy of Richie Viera’s Archive. al principio dudaban del talento de La Lupe, pero ahora la estaba cortejando. “Cuando la escuché junto a Mongo por primera vez, no me interesó su estilo”, Puente le dijo a Roll- ing Stone en 1972. “Ella le llamaba soul, pero yo le llamaba gritería. Entonces escuché un día un disco de Lupe, y me impresionó. Pensé que sería bueno tratar de trabajar con ella, y ver si la podía desarrollar. Yo fui el que consiguió que cantara su primer bolero, ‘Que Te Pedí’, y se convirtió en su primer gran éxito”. El tema, escondido en el medio del lado B de la magistral colaboración de 1965 entre Tito y La Lupe, Tito Puente Swings – The Exciting Lupe Sings, fue de hecho uno que realmente quemaba a fuego lento, uno de tres boleros mezclados con el ruido finamente orquestado que era simbólico de Puente. Bajo la direc- ción de la colección de productores importantes de Tico Records, se convertiría en una de las muchas canciones icónicas que el dúo lanzaría al cabo de dos años y cinco LPs. El brillo que Puente brindaba fue más que suficiente para catapultar a Lupe (quien ahora era madre) al primer plano de la música latina, capturando el rapto vocal que Lupe había estado liberando ante las muchedumbres a lo largo de la década anterior, y refinán- dolo con su toque de veterano. Lo que no quiere decir que grabar a La Lupe, ya fuera un bolero, rumba, o guaguancó, fuese un paseo. “Era el demonio en bicicleta”, dice el veterano cantante Willie Torres, quien contribuyó varios coros a las sesiones ya clásicas de Tico durante los años 60, incluyendo las de Lupe. “Siempre tenía a todo el mundo al borde”. El ingeniero y productor Fred Weinberg recuerda en la película de Troyano la constante hazaña de capturar la voz de Lupe en el estudio. “Era como un huracán cuando entraba por la puerta. No creo que dos de las tomas de Lupe fueron iguales, o sea que sacábamos de ellas lo que podíamos. A ella no le importaba si se le escuchaba algún ruido raro en el micrófono; [eso] volvía loco a Puente. ‘¡Soy yo!’, decía”. “Puente se convirtió en un mentor para La Lupe”, escribió el historiador Joe Conzo en un artículo para el Times-Herald Record en el 2004. “Él le proporcionó un ambiente en el cual ella podía expresar su creatividad”. Con todo lo que se benefició La Lupe del nombre y de la experiencia de Puente, él también se benefició del estrellato de Lupe, que quizás para entonces brillaba demasiado para el ego del Rey. “Ella era cantante en la orquesta de Tito Puente, y así es como le gustaban a él las cosas”, recordó el diseñador de carátu- las de discos y personaje de la música latina Izzy Sanabria en el documental de Troyano. “Pero cuando la gente venía a ver a La Lupe, acompañada por la orquesta de Tito Pu- ente...eso no le cayó muy bien a Tito. Ella era demasiado estelar... Ningún otro artista latino de esa época y en ese género musical había alcanzado ese tipo de exposición”. Por consiguiente, Tito despidió a La Lupe. Por suerte para ella, Morris Levy, dueño de Tico Records, amaba tanto a su talento y al dinero que se estaba ganando gracias a ella, que le ofreció un contrato como solista. La Lupe rápidamente se dispuso a probarle a su ex jefe (y al cualquier otro escéptico) que era absolutamente capaz de vender discos por su cuenta. El hecho de que Puente esencialmente reemplazó a Lupe con su compatri- ota exilada Celia Cruz tiene que haber contribuido a la ira de Lupe, la cual expresó en letras como, “Y yo que le daba todo a mi jefe Tito Puente / Se me fue con la del frente, y solita me dejó [coro] / Ay ay ay, Tito Puente la botó” / Me botó, me botó”. Sin embargo, en vez de enfrentársele a Celia, La Lupe flexionó sus dinámicos músculos, tirando una curva estilística en su primer LP como solista, Y Su Alma Venezolana, rechazando arre- glos orquestados tipo big band para utilizar en su lugar un set minimalista de pegadizos números acústicos venezolanos. “La Lupe era mi preferida”, dice Izzy Sanabria desde su hogar en Tampa, Florida. “La diferencia entre Celia y ella es que Celia era una dama— gran estilo, gran voz. Pero La Lupe cantaba desde lo mas profundo de su alma. No hay otra manera de explicarlo”. De 1966 a 1974, el alma de Lupe estaría efectivamente en pleno vigor en una docena de discos, un acontecimiento que pudiera haber sido bautizado—con el mismo nombre de su LP del ’68—la era de La Lupe (La Lupe’s Era). Se había convertido en una estrella financiable a su carismática mane- ra, y en 1969 pasó a ser la primera hispana en encabezar un show en Carnegie Hall, cobrando hasta $10,000 por noche. “Le gusto a la gente porque soy sincera”, le dijo La Lupe a la revista New York en 1969. “Puedes escuchar mis discos en todas las casas del barrio. Le rezo a Dios que nunca pierda mi sinceridad”. Además de vender millones de discos, la invitaban a tocar en festivales de rock con actos como Iron Butterfly, Jethro Tull, las Supremes, y Ray Charles, posicionándose para atraer a los fanáticos del pop sicodélico, un grupo que esperaba comprara su disco Queen Does Her Own Thing, producido por Harvey Av- erne y con arreglos de éxitos de rock y soul por Marty Sheller. Atrajo la atención del Vil- lage Voice, en el cual prácticamente se ex- clamó, “Ella es Janis, Aretha, y Edith Piaf mezcladas en una. Canta baladas mejor que Piaf, y canciones movidas como las otras dos—con locura añadida... Pudiese ganar una fortuna en el ámbito del rock... La Lupe—es devastadora, y parece que se está devastando a sí misma...Jim Morrison, toma nota”. Morrison no vivió lo suficiente para tomar nota, pero el anfitrión de televisión Dick Cavett sí lo hizo. “Cuando recibió la llamada para presentarse en el programa de Dick Cavett”, recuerda Marty Sheller, “Lupe me dijo, ‘Marty, quiero que me hagas un arreglo de “Afro Blue”. Bobby Rosengarden estaba a cargo de la orquesta [del programa], y Víctor Paz era el trompetista principal. Pero la mayoría de los músicos americanos nunca habían tocado un 6/8 al estilo latino, así es que hacerlo bien tomó varios intentos. Aunque sólo era un ensayo, Lupe empezó a adentrarse en su zona, y los músicos se estaban muriendo de la risa; nunca habían visto nada igual. Pero todo sonaba muy bien. Entonces llegó la hora de grabar el programa y ella salió. Yo dije, “¡Carajo, mira lo que tiene puesto!” “La palabra wow estaba en boca de muchos”, relató Cavett sobre el episodio en la película de Troyano, comparando la energética presencia de La Lupe con la de Jimi Hen- drix o la de Fred Astaire. “El público sabía que estaba presenciando algo diferente a lo que jamás había visto”. Cuando Lupe terminó su versión frenética de “Afro Blue”, la audiencia nacional televisiva había visto más de sus voluptuosas curvas y su unitardo dorado de lo que hubiese querido ver, sin hablar del casi desnudo Dick Cavett bailando junto a ella. Mientras tanto, más o menos al mismo tiempo en que La Lupe estaba causando con- troversia en la televisión convencional, Fania Records y su acto principal, las Estrellas de Fania, estaban haciendo un gran revuelo en el mercado latino con música a la que llamaban salsa, e incitando disturbios en lugares como el estadio de los Yankees, que se vendían a capacidad. La salsa era un moderna, joven, e impetuosa vuelta “neoyoricana” a la música afro-cubana que empezaba a revolucionar el ambiente de la música latina en la Gran Manzana y más allá, y que contaba con muchas canciones escritas por Tite Curet Alonso, quien se había lanzado a la fama con su primer éxito, “La Gran Tirana”, del álbum de años atrás, Queen of Latin Soul, de La Lupe. Aunque las candentes energías de ambos hubiesen parecido resultar en un emparejamiento natural, Fania no quería mucho que ver con La Lupe, ya que habían contratado a su única cantante femenina, Celia Cruz, a la que eventualmente llamarían la “Reina de la Salsa”. Por su parte, Celia, la mayor de las dos, respetaba a su colega. “Lupe es una buena intérprete de canciones de la música moderna”, le dijo a Rolling Stone en 1972. “Ese no es mi estilo, pero ella es también una creadora, y yo la admiro por eso”. Por lo tanto, la única presentación de La Lupe con un conjunto estelar sería con “Sale el Sol” en 1974 en Carnegie Hall, como parte del concierto de las Estrellas de Tico-Alegre, la última llamada para el desvaneciente imperio latino de Morris Levy, el cual pronto sería absorbido por la rápida expansión de Fania. Y aunque su producto fue sólido durante el resto de los años 70, el brillo de La Lupe comenzó a disminuir. La década de los años 80 fue simplemente cruel, a medida que rumores de uso de drogas, problemas económi- cos, un incendio en su apartamento, y una debilitante caída severamente afectaron a la madre de dos, obligándola a depender de la misericordia de refugios para desampara- dos, cheques de asistencia social del gobierno, y de sus colegas músicos. Sabiendo que la música que llevaba dentro no la soltaría, ella soltó a la música, abandonando por completo las presentaciones seculares y cambiando sus creencias santeras por las pentecostales. En 1992, cuando murió mientras dormía de un ataque masivo al corazón a la edad de 56 (ó 59) años, muchos se reunieron para llorar a una de las estrellas más grandes que jamás habían visto o escuchado. Y aunque ella había logrado más que la mayoría, todavía persistía la sensación de que quizás el ícono controversial no había logrado alcanzar el máximo potencial que Dios le otorgó. Había sido una luchadora toda su vida, superando obstáculos raciales, políticos, y personales a lo largo del camino. “Soy negra y cubana, y no le agrado a mucha gente por eso”, le había dicho a la revista Rolling Stone veinte años antes de su muerte. “La gente es prejuiciada porque uno es negro, son prejuiciados porque uno es gordo... En Cuba existía el prejuicio, pero a mí no me importa. Había prejuicio en Norteamérica también cuando llegué. Todavía sigo luchando por La Lupe, sigo luchando... Canto música soul porque me gusta. ¡Cantaría en China siempre y cuando la gente tenga soul!” “En Cuba me decían loca”, diría La Lupe después. “No me entendían”. El Bronx—en donde actualmente se encuentra La Lupe Way—definitivamente sí la entendió.