s

Willie Colon & Ruben Blades

Siembra Special Edition

$1.29

Willie Colon & Ruben Blades

Siembra Special Edition

$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
Plástico
Buscando Guayaba
Pedro Navaja
María Lionza
Ojos
Dime
Siembra
Dime (Take 2)
Pedro Navaja (Take 2)
Ligia Elena (Merengue Version)
Plástico (Instrumental Edit)
Siembra ( Joe Claussell Remix)

Siembra is one of those landmark albums that marks a before and after in a musical genre. Thirty years after its release, the seven songs on the second album by Willie Colón and Rubén Blades remain a reference point for salsa and a creative high-water mark for all Afro-Caribbean music. Yet, unlike other influential albums that set trends or spawn imitators, Siembra ranks in a class of its own. Even though it was the best selling salsa album of its era, other musicians knew it would be futile to copy it. For in many ways, Siembra was a magical work, the product of a unique time and place that even its own creators never attempted to duplicate, though they would go on to make two more albums together. To understand Siembra’s startling impact, consider what was happening in Latin music in the fall of 1978. The salsa boom of the early 70s, an authentic cultural phenomenon, was fading, along with the decade that had seen it rise from the streets of San Juan and Spanish Harlem. By 1978, music that had once sounded so fresh started to sound formulaic and artists who had once found inspiration in the barrio had started calculating how to reach wider audiences by crossing over to a non-Latino market. Not surprisingly, fans abandoned salsa in droves and flocked to the pop music craze of the day, disco music. Suddenly, Siembra arrives and hits a note heard round the world. There had been nothing like it in salsa before and there’s been nothing quite like it since. The album opens with a few bars of clichéd disco music, suggesting perhaps that Blades and Colón had fallen for the fad. But the music abruptly snaps into a salsa rhythm with an insistent, irresistible clave, the heartbeat of Afro-Cuban music. The shift from frivolous fad to hardcore salsa is so powerful that it makes musical mockery of those lightweight disco bars. Thus, a note of satire was struck before a single word was sung. Blades then launches into the biting verses of “Plástico,” an indictment of materialism and social pretense that marks the opening salvo in a record that would succeed by going against trends and traditions. Instead of crossing over to English-speaking audiences, Siembra built musical bridges to the rest of Latin America. Instead of sticking to standard dance rhythms, it experimented with new percussion patterns and defied the rules of clave. Instead of offering tunes tailored for dancers, it offered songs made for listeners, with complex lyrics and provocative messages. “It wasn’t a predictable album,” says Colón. “You started listening and it would just kind of blow your mind because we broke a lot of rules.” Like a lot of great art, though, Siembra didn’t just appear in a vacuum. The elements that made it great were already percolating in the salsa scene. It wasn’t the first album to contain narrative songs based on barrio life. It wasn’t the first to suggest messages of racial equality and assert Latino pride. It wasn’t even the first concept album in salsa. But those elements all came together in a way that made Siembra special. And that was no fluke. Its creators, in their separate ways, had set out to make their mark. Says Blades, the songwriter: “At the risk of sounding immodest, I believed it would be like no other salsa album ever made because of the lyrics and the urban themes. I wanted to prove that audiences were more intelligent than they were being credited for and that salsa could be of interest even for non-dancing, non-barrio people all over Latin America. I believed then and now that music is not intended solely for entertainment and escapism; it can be used as means to confront issues of social and political importance and to document our struggles, our failures and our triumphs as a society.” Says Colón, the producer: “I wanted to put out the best record anybody ever made. I wanted you to picture the band in your mind when you heard the record, to close your eyes and actually feel where the instruments are, like sonar almost.” Playing the original vinyl album today on a modern, audiophile turntable tells you how well he succeeded. Achieving technical quality that holds up after three decades took ample rehearsal before even getting to the studio, and ample freedom once there. “There was nobody looking over our shoulders and screaming about using too much studio time,” says Colón. “We were able to get really meticulous about the recording and just relax and fool around without saying, ‘Oh, no, how are we going to pay for the next ten hours?’ There was no time pressure, which is a real luxury.” The album’s biggest hit, “Pedro Navaja,” was also it’s longest at 7:21, one of only three songs on Side A. That length was anathema to commercial radio, and even Colón worried it was too long. Yet, when stations tried cutting it, fans called in to complain. They wanted to hear the whole story, which Colón calls a “phono-novela” - about the two-bit street thug who accosts a prostitute and gets his comeuppance. The song became a phenomenon in its own right spinning off theater productions, a movie, a sequel and even a proposed television show. The song was loosely based on “Mack the Knife,” and like that tune it escalated in tone and pace as the story progressed. The song’s taut and gripping arrangement, by Luis “Perico” Ortiz, gave Blades the first sense that something special was in the works; he calls it “dark and nasty, like a shark going at you sideways.” Colón knew that Ortíz, more than other arrangers, listened closely to lyrics and tailored his charts to the text. For “Pedro Navaja,” he opens with a single conga behind Blades’ vocal, a perfect start for a complex story. “He didn’t overwrite,” says Colón of Perico’s work, “but that was smart of him because he had such a long ways to run that if you start over-writing in the beginning, it’s just going to be a mess. His arrangement was dynamic. It just kept building and building, and by the time it did get to the chorus, it was just smokin.” Choosing the right arrangers was another secret to Siembra’s success. For the rousing close of the album, Colón recruited Argentine arranger Carlos Franzetti who infused the title track with strings and high drama, which Blades rightly calls “majestic.” Colón says “it sounded almost like a battle cry,” with the chorus shouting the two-syllable word that means “to sow” in Spanish. Blades uses the imperative - “Siem-bra-a-a-a.” - commanding listeners to sow if they hope to reap a better life for themselves and their children. In his soneos, or improvisations, he alludes back to that disco introduction with a reference to actor John Travolta, star of the film “Saturday Night Fever” which ignited the mass disco craze: Olvida la Travoltada y enfrenta la realidad / De la cara a tu tierra y asi el cambio llegará. The themes in Siembra hit a chord across the continent because Blades had an instinctive sense for the values and ideals of Latin American culture. The chorus of “Pedro Navaja,” for example, evoked a popular belief in the unexpected twists of fate (“La Vida Te Da Sopresas.”) “Plástico” hit the nerve that divides social classes. “Buscando Guayaba,” another big hit, touches on the need to be resourceful when Blades improvises a scatting solo because, as he announces on the record, “the guitarist didn’t show up” for the recording. And in the mystical “Maria Lionza,” he invokes a Venezuelan cult goddess to show how the poor pray for miracles everywhere in the same way, no matter what shape their saints take in the syncretic fusion of Spanish, African and Indian religions. Add to all this the elements of ethnic pride, Latino empowerment and Pan American unity and you have a mighty powerful cultural mix that allowed Siembra to cross all class, racial and geographic borders. Those themes naturally arose from the collection of songs Blades had written for the session. In the studio, the themes were strengthened, as when the duo decided to add a rousing roll-call of Latin nations at the end of “Plástico.” Some excellent songs didn’t make the cut. The politically charged “Tiburón” and the satirical love story “Ligia Elena” were left for their next album, Canciones del Solar de Los Aburridos. One can quibble with the choices, given they kept “Dime,” a ditty that now seems dispensable. But Blades says he wouldn’t change a thing. (“What ever for?”) And Colón only wishes he had included one of his own songs, not so much for artistic reasons as for royalties, since the album sold so well. As to why Siembra has had such long-lasting and far-reaching impact, the two artists offer succinct responses. Says Colón: “It wasn’t just an album but a social movement.” Adds Blades: “It was honest. It was smart. It was powerful music.” Liner notes written by Agustin Gurza Siembra es uno de esos álbumes maravillosos que marcan el antes y después de un género musical. Treinta años después de su salida al mercado, los siete temas del segundo álbum de Willie Colón y Rubén Blades, continúan siendo un punto de referencia para la salsa y establecen un alto nivel para toda la música afrocaribeña. Sin embargo, a diferencia de otros álbumes influyentes que establecen tendencias o crean imitadores, Siembra ha quedado clasificado único en su clase. A pesar de que fue el álbum de salsa de mayor venta en su época, otros músicos reconocían que sería inútil tratar de copiarlo. Ya que en muchas maneras, Siembra era una labor mágica, el producto de una época única y un lugar donde incluso sus propios creadores nunca intentaron duplicar, a pesar de que más adelante producirían juntos dos álbumes más. Para entender el impacto sorprendente de Siembra, es necesario considerar lo que estaba ocurriendo en el ámbito de la música latina en otoño de 1978. El auge de la salsa del principio de los años 70, un auténtico fenómeno cultural, estaba decayendo, junto con la década que había visto la salsa elevarse desde las calles de San Juan y Harlem latino. Ya para el 1978, la música que una vez sonó tan fresca, comenzó a sonar como una fórmula envasada; y los artistas que una vez encontraron inspiración en el barrio comenzaron a calcular cómo alcanzar a una audiencia más grande haciendo el cross-over a un mercado que no fuera latino. No es de sorprenderse que los aficionados abandonaran la salsa en manadas y se unieran a la fiebre de la música pop del momento, la música disco. De repente, llega Siembra y toca una nota fuerte que se oye en el mundo entero. No había existido nada como Siembra en la salsa, y no ha existido nada igual desde entonces. El álbum abre con unos cuantos compases cliché de música disco, que tal vez sugieren que Blades y Colón han caído en la fiebre del disco. Pero la música cambia abruptamente al ritmo de la salsa con una insistente e irresistible clave, el corazón de la música afrocubana. El cambio de la frivolidad de una música de moda, a una salsa auténtica es tan poderoso, que se burla musicalmente de esos compases ligeros y superficiales de la música disco. De modo que se escucha una nota satírica antes de cantar una sola palabra. Blades entonces se lanza en los versos sarcásticos de “Plástico”, una crítica al materialismo y las pretensiones que marcan el estallido del álbum que alcanzaría el éxito yendo en contra de las tendencias y las tradiciones. En vez de hacer un crossover a las audiencias de habla inglesa, Siembra creó puentes musicales al resto de América Latina. En vez de mantenerse al estándar de los ritmos de baile, experimentó con nuevos patrones de percusión y desafió las reglas de la clave. En vez de ofrecer armonías hechas para los bailadores, ofrecía temas hechos para los oyentes, con letras complejas y mensajes provocativos. “No era un álbum predecible”, dice Colón. “Empezabas a escuchar y te dejaba alucinado porque rompimos muchas de las reglas”. Sin embargo, al igual que mucho del arte maravilloso, Siembra no apareció en un vacío. Los elementos que lo hicieron maravilloso ya estaban penetrando el ámbito de la salsa. No era el primer álbum en contar con temas narrativos basados en la vida del barrio. No era el primero en proponer mensajes de inigualdad racial y afirmar el orgullo latino. Ni tan siquiera era el primer álbum conceptual de salsa. Pero esos elementos todos se fisionaron de una manera que hizo especial a Siembra. Y no fue por casualidad. Sus creadores, a su propia manera cada uno, tenían que salir y dejar su huella. Dice Blades, el compositor de canciones: “Arriesgándome a sonar engreído, realmente creí que sería como ningún otro álbum de salsa producido, por la letra y los temas urbanos. Quería probar que la audiencia era más inteligente de lo que se le acreditaba y que la salsa podía ser de interés, incluso para toda aquella gente alrededor de América Latina que no bailaba y no era del barrio. Creía entonces como creo ahora, que la música no sólo tiene que entretener y brindar un escape; puede utilizarse como un medio para confrontar temas de importancia política y social y para documentar nuestra lucha, nuestros fracasos y nuestros triunfos como sociedad”. Dice Colón, el productor: “Yo quería sacar el mejor disco que se hubiera hecho. Quería que pudieras ver una imagen de la banda en tu mente cuando oyeras el disco, que cerraras los ojos y realmente escucharas dónde están los instrumentos, casi como soñar”. Tocar el álbum original de vinilo hoy, en un tocadiscos moderno de un aficionado de música permite apreciar el éxito que obtuvieron. Alcanzar una calidad técnica que se mantiene después de tres décadas tomó bastantes ensayos aún antes de entrar en el estudio, y bastantes libertades una vez allí. “No había nadie mirando sobre nuestros hombros y regañándonos por usar demasiado tiempo en el estudio”, dice Colón. “Realmente pudimos ser meticulosos sobre los detalles de la grabación, relajarnos y disfrutarlo sin tener que decir ‘Oh, no, ¿cómo vamos a pagar por las próximas diez horas?’ No había ninguna presión por el tiempo, lo cual es un verdadero lujo”. El éxito más grande del álbum, “Pedro Navaja”, también era el de mayor duración con 7:21, uno de sólo 3 temas en el Lado A. Esa duración era un anatema para la radio comercial, e incluso Colón se preocupada de que era demasiado largo. Sin embargo, cuando las estaciones intentaron cortarlo, los aficionados llamaban para quejarse. Ellos querían escuchar la historia completa, la cual Colón le llama una “fononovela”, sobre un malhechor matón que acosa a una prostituta y obtiene su merecido. La canción se convirtió en un fenómeno en su propio derecho de la cual se hicieron producciones de teatro, una película, una continuación a la historia y hasta una propuesta para la televisión. La canción estaba basada ligeramente en “Mack the Knife”, y al igual que esa melodía, escalaba en el tono y el ritmo según progresaba la historia. El arreglo limpio y emocionante de la canción, por Luis “Perico” Ortiz, le dio ha Blades un el sentido de que algo especial se estaba cocinando; él le llama “oscuro y malo, como un tiburón que te viene de lado”. Colón sabía que Ortiz, más que otros arreglistas, escuchaba la letra con mucha atención y compuso sus arreglos a la medida del texto. Para “Pedro Navaja”, abre una sola conga detrás de la voz de Blades, un comienzo perfecto para una historia compleja. “No sobrecompuso”, dice Colón sobre el trabajo de Perico, “pero eso fue muy inteligente de su parte porque el recorrido que tenía por caminar era tan largo que si comienzas a sobrecomponer desde el principio, se va a convertir en un lío. Su arreglo era dinámico. Fue escalando y escalando y para el momento en que llegó al coro, estaba explotando”. Elegir a los arreglistas adecuados fue otro secreto del éxito Siembra. Para el cierre vigoroso del álbum, Colón reclutó al arreglista argentino Carlos Franzetti quien infundió el tema que le da el título, con cuerdas y mucho drama, el cual Blades le da el merecido nombre de “majestuoso”. Colón dice: “casi sonaba como un grito de guerra” con el coro gritando la palabra de dos sílabas “siembra”. Blades utiliza el imperativo, “Siem-bra-a-a-a.”, ordenándole a los oyentes a sembrar si tienen la esperanza de conseguir una mejor vida para ellos y sus hijos. En sus soneos o improvisaciones alude a la introducción de disco con referencia al actor John Travolta, la estrella de la película “Saturday Night Fever” la cual inició la fiebre masiva del disco: Olvida la Travoltada y enfrenta la realidad / Da la cara a tu tierra y así el cambio llegará Los temas en Siembra pegaron bien a través del continente porque Blades tenía un sentido instintivo por los valores e ideales de la cultura latinoamericana. El coro de “Pedro Navaja”, por ejemplo, evoca a la creencia popular en el desenlace inesperado del destino (“La vida te da sorpresas”). “Plástico” tocó el nervio que divide las clases sociales. “Buscando Guayaba”, otro gran éxito, habla sobre la necesidad de ser ingenioso cuando Blades improvisa un solo imitando el tres con su voz, porque como él anuncia en el disco, “el guitarrista no vino” para la grabación. Y en la mística “María Lionza” le invoca a la diosa del culto venezolano que nos enseñe cómo rezan los pobres en todas partes para milagros de la misma manera, sin importar la forma que tengan sus santos en la fusión sincrética de las religiones españolas, africanas e indias. Súmale a todo esto, los elementos del orgullo étnico, el empoderamiento latino y la unidad panamericana y obtienes una mezcla cultural muy poderosa que permitió que Siembra pudiera cruzar todas las barreras de clase, raza y geográficas. Esos temas naturalmente surgieron de una colección de canciones que Blades había escrito para la sesión. En el estudio, se fortalecieron los temas, como cuando el dúo decidió añadir una energética pasada de lista de los países latinos al final de “Plástico”. Algunos excelentes temas quedaron fuera. El políticamente cargado tema de “Tiburón” y la satírica historia de amor “Ligia Elena” quedaron para el próximo álbum del dúo, Canciones del solar de los aburridos. Uno puede diferir sobre alguno de los temas elegidos, dado a que dejaron “Dime”, una cancioncilla que ahora parece ser dispensable Pero Blades dice que no cambiaría nada. (“¿Por qué?”) Y Colón sólo hubiera deseado haber incluido una de sus propias canciones, no tanto por motivos artísticos sino por las regalías, debido a que el álbum se vendió tan bien. En cuanto a la razón por la cual Siembra ha tenido un impacto tan duradero y tan trascendental, los dos artistas ofrecen respuestas concisas. Dice Colón: “No fue sólo un álbum, sino un movimiento social”. Dice Blades: “Fue música honesta. Fue inteligente. Fue poderosa.” Notas discográficas escritas por by Agustín Gurza