s

Orlando Marín and His Orchestra

Que Chévere, Vol. II

$1.50

Orlando Marín and His Orchestra

Que Chévere, Vol. II

$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$14.98 Album
Quien Llorara (Guaguancó) with Elliot Romero
Casera Ten Cuida’o (Son Montuno) with Cheo Feliciano
El Loco (Mambo) with Chivirico Dávila
Que Mujer (Son Montuno) with Willie Torres
El Timbalero (Mambo) with Elliot Romero
Que Chévere (Mambo) with Willie Torres
Rico Melao (Cha Cha Cha) with Willie Torres
Meche (Mambo)
Besitos de Caramelos (Mambo) with Chivirico Dávila
Tiene Saoco (Guaguancó) with Chivirico Dávila
Llegue (Mambo)

Bronx-born timbalero and bandleader Orlando Marín has been a part of New York’s Latin music scene since his mid-teens when he formed his first band with vocalist Joe Quijano and pianist Eddie Palmieri. By the age of eighteen, Marín was leading his own orchestra and playing dance venues like the Tropicana, Stardust, and Hunts Point Palace. At a time when competition was strong and the top Latin bandleaders all battled for the title “Mambo King,” Marín built a reputation for having one of the tightest dance bands in the city. Marín describes his mind-set in this competitive environment: “My mentality is that I’ll get on the stage before or after anybody, and I’m going to leave the stage burning. And whoever burns it the best, that’s the king that night.” Orlando Marín’s first big record deal came in 1956 with Fiesta Records, where he recorded two (shared) albums and several singles before being drafted to serve in Korea. “I had the hottest band in New York when I went to the Army in 1958,” Marín explains. “I had the top young musicians in New York at the time. I had [bongosero] Luis ‘Chicky’ Pérez, who Tito Puente grabbed after I left.” Being drafted may have altered the course of Orlando Marín’s career as a professional musician, but his connection to music remained strong even while in the Army. “I was drafted sometime in the early summer, April or May, and by Christmas, I was feeling brokenhearted. My band broke up, I was in the hills of Korea—there were no showers, nothing,” Marín explains. “We were living in Quonset huts—you know, with oil burners and stuff like that. So one night, someone said, ‘They’re having live music at the USO show; you should go down.’ So I got dressed up and went down there, and would you believe it, Noro Morales, the great pianist from Puerto Rico, is playing. On the drums, he’s got a kid called Mikey Collazo, the drummer from my [high] school. I knew the whole band—it was like a miracle. But the bigger thing that happened was that later on I joined an all-Army [music] contest that was done every year, and I won in the Pacific command. I toured the Pacific and played in different places, like Japan, Korea, Hawaii, and then Washington, D.C., for the finals. The finalists all went to The Ed Sullivan Show in 1959.” After returning from military service in early 1960, Orlando Marín reorganized his orchestra and began playing clubs again, eventually gaining the attention of Alegre Records, one of the premier labels in Latin music during the 1960s. Marín explains in detail how he came to record for Alegre: “Mike Amadeo used to work for Alegre Records and Al Santiago, in their record shop [Casalegre], which was on Westchester and Prospect Avenue. He heard me play opposite [Johnny] Pacheco with my trumpet band here in 1960, and my band was cooking, you know. So he said, ‘Man, you guys are great, and we are going to recommend you to Al Santiago.’ And sure enough, Santiago said, ‘Yeah, we want to record you’—on the word of Mike Amadeo. Also, Mikey Collazo’s brother, Harold, worked [at the record store], and he recommended us too. So it was like heaven sent, you know, everything fell into place. But a very unusual story happened there, because Chivirico Dávila had just come to New York—he had left the Pérez Prado orchestra where he had substituted for Beny Moré, who quit and went back to Cuba to make his band. So Chivirico Dávila, in 1960, came to New York. He was in the store, the record shop, with Al Santiago when I walked in to tell Al, ‘Look, I can’t do the recording session now, because I have no singer.’ And he says to me, ‘Oh, don’t worry. You see that guy over there? He’s the best singer in the world.’ It happened to be Chivirico Dávila. You can’t plan this. You know what I’m saying? It’s unbelievable. I used the guy, I showed him the style I wanted, and he fell in like...coffee and milk. Absolutely. The guy was one of the best singers in the world for what they call salsa today, but then it was mambo, bolero, cha-cha-cha—he sings everything. A very nice man too.” In 1961, Alegre Records released the single “La Casa” by Orlando Marín and His Orchestra, and it quickly became a big hit in New York and abroad, particularly in Colombia, where Marín’s music was widely popular. Soon after the success of his first Alegre single, Marín recorded his first album for Alegre Records, Se Te Quemó la Casa. The success of the album helped keep Marín’s band in demand, and in 1964, they recorded a second album for Alegre, titled Que Chévere, Vol. II. On Que Chévere, Orlando Marín and His Orchestra played a mix of up-tempo mambos, guaguancós, and son montunos. Absent from the album was the pachanga, a style that was featured prominently on Marín’s previous album but that was waning in popularity by that time. According to Marín, the personnel on Que Chévere was “very similar but not exactly the same” as the personnel on Se Te Quemó la Casa, which included Francisco “Paquito” Pastor (piano), Julio Andino (bass), Tito Jiménez (percussion), Pedro Chaparro (trumpet), and “Chicky” Pérez (percussion), among others. Like his first Alegre album, Que Chévere sold well and added to the popularity of Marín’s orchestra, and in the summer of 1965, they were contracted to play for two weeks along with Tito Puente and his orchestra at Club Virginia in Los Angeles—an experience that is a major highlight of Marín’s career. After parting with Alegre in the mid-1960s, Marín recorded another mambo album with the Fiesta label, then a boogaloo album with the Brunswick label, and finally a Latin jazz album with Mañana, a small label run by Al Santiago, a man whom Orlando Marín holds in very high regard for his contribution to Latin music. “A person who needs a lot of credit is Al Santiago, who was a great thinker, you know, very progressive in his thoughts and very open-minded to many things. He opened the door for Pacheco, Charlie Palmieri, Eddie Palmieri, and many others—not so much for me, because I had recorded albums before [Alegre], but he did give me the chance to come back and do my thing.” Although Orlando Marín has not recorded an album since the 1970s, his band continues to play and pay homage to the mambo era and to the many bands and musicians who never received proper recognition in their time. “They were all kings,” Marín said when talking about his peers in Latin music, many of whom have passed away. “Every band had a following, and, to your following, you were the king.” Liner notes by Jonathan Reynaldo Bailey Orlando Marín, timbalero y líder de banda nacido en el Bronx, ha estado involucrado en el ambiente de la música latina de Nueva York desde su adolescencia, cuando formó su primera banda con el cantante Joe Quijano y el pianista Eddie Palmieri. A los 18 años, Marín ya dirigía su propia orquesta y tocaba en locales de baile como el Tropicana, el Stardust y Hunts Point Palace. En una época en que la competencia era fuerte y los directores de orquestas latinas se peleaban el título de “Rey del Mambo”, Marín y su grupo adquirieron una reputación como una de las bandas más acopladas de la ciudad. Marín describe su mentalidad en este entorno competitivo: “Mi mentalidad es que voy a subir al escenario antes o después de cualquiera, y voy a dejar el escenario en llamas. Y el que lo queme mejor, ese es el rey esa noche”. Orlando Marín firmó su primer gran contrato discográfico en 1956 con Fiesta Records, para la cual grabó dos álbumes (compartidos) y varios sencillos antes de ser reclutado para servir en Corea. “Tenía la banda más caliente de Nueva York cuando me fui al ejército en 1958”, explica Marín. “Los mejores músicos jóvenes de Nueva York de esa época estaban conmigo. Tenía a [el bongosero] Luis ‘Chicky’ Pérez, a quien Tito Puente se llevó cuando me fui”. Es posible que el ser reclutado haya alterado el curso de la carrera musical profesional de Orlando Marín, pero su conexión con la música se mantuvo sólida aun mientras estuvo en el ejército. “Me reclutaron durante el comienzo del verano, en abril o mayo, y al llegar la Navidad me sentía como si tuviera el corazón partido. Mi banda se había separado, estaba en la lomas de Corea—no había duchas, nada”, explica Marín. “Vivíamos en cabañas Quonset—tu sabes, con lámparas de aceite y eso. Y una noche dice alguien, ‘Van a tocar música en vivo en el show del USO; deberías ir’. Me vestí y me fui para allá, y puedes creer que Noro Morales, el gran pianista puertorriqueño, estaba tocando. Tras la batería estaba un muchacho llamado Mikey Collazo, el baterista de mi escuela [superior]. Yo conocía a la banda entera—fue como un milagro. Pero lo más grande es que más adelante me inscribí en un concurso de música que el ejército realizaba todos los años, y gané en el comando del Pacífico. Me fui de gira por el Pacífico y toqué en diferentes lugares como el Japón, Corea, Hawai, y luego en Washington, D.C. para las finales. Los finalistas fuimos todos a El Show de Ed Sullivan en 1959”. Tras su regreso del servicio militar a principios de 1960, Orlando Marín reorganizó su orquesta y volvió una vez más a tocar en clubes, eventualmente llamando la atención de Alegre Records, una de las más prestigiosas disqueras durante los años 60. Marín explica en detalle cómo fue que terminó grabando para Alegre: “Mike Amadeo trabajaba para Alegre Records y Al Santiago en la tienda de discos de Alegre [Casalegre], localizada en Westchester y la Avenida Prospect. Me oyó tocar junto a [Johnny] Pacheco con mi banda de trompetas aquí en 1960, y mi banda estaba guisando, ¿sabes? Así es que me dice, ‘Oye, ustedes son buenísimos, y los vamos a recomendar a Al Santiago’. Y efectivamente, Santiago dijo, “Sí, queremos grabarlos’—sólo confiando en la palabra de Mike Amadeo. Además, Harold, el hermano de Mikey Collazo, trabajaba [en la tienda de discos], y nos recomendó también. Y fue como algo que bajó del cielo, ¿sabes? Todo encajó en su lugar. Pero ocurrió algo bien raro, porque Chivirico Dávila acababa de llegar a Nueva York—había dejado a la orquesta de Pérez Prado, en donde había sustituido a Beny Moré luego de que éste renunciara y regresara a Cuba a formar su banda. Así es que Chivirico Dávila llegó a Nueva York en 1960, y estaba en la tienda de discos con Al Santiago cuando yo entré a decirle a Al, ‘Mira, no puedo grabar la sesión ahora porque no tengo cantante’. Y me dice, ‘No te preocupes. ¿Tú ves a ese tipo ahí? Es el mejor cantante del mundo’. Y, casualmente, era Chivirico Dávila. Esas cosas no se planean. ¿Tú me entiendes? Es increíble. Usé al tipo, le enseñé el estilo que quería, y cayó como... la leche en el café. Absolutamente. Era uno de los mejores cantantes en el mundo de lo que ahora se llama salsa, pero entonces era mambo, bolero, cha-cha-chá—cantaba de todo. Y era muy buena persona también”. En 1961 Alegre Records lanzó el sencillo “La Casa” por Orlando Marín y Su Orquesta, y se convirtió rápidamente en un gran éxito en Nueva York y en el extranjero, particularmente en Colombia, donde la música de Marín era muy popular. Poco después del éxito de su primera canción con Alegre, Marín grabó su primer álbum para Alegre Records, Se Te Quemó la Casa. La popularidad del álbum ayudó a mantener a la banda de Marín muy ocupada, y en 1964 grabaron un segundo álbum para Alegre titulado Qué Chévere, Vol. II. En Qué Chévere, Orlando Marín y Su Orquesta tocaron una mezcla de mambos movidos, guaguancós y sones montunos. Ausente estaba la pachanga, un estilo que se destacó de manera especial en el álbum anterior de Marín pero que estaba perdiendo popularidad en ese momento. Según Marín, el grupo de Que Chévere era “muy similar pero no exactamente el mismo” que el grupo de Se Te Quemó la Casa, y éste incluía a Francisco “Paquito” Pastor (piano), Julio Andino (bajo), Tito Jiménez (percusión), Pedro Chaparro (trompeta), y “Chicky” Pérez (percusión), entre otros. Al igual que su primer álbum para Alegre, Qué Chévere vendió bien y contribuyó a la popularidad de la orquesta de Marín, y en el verano de 1965 fueron contratados para tocar por dos semanas en el Club Virginia en Los Ángeles, junto a Tito Puente y su orquesta—una de las experiencias más importantes en la carrera de Marín. Después de separarse de Alegre a mediados de los años 60, Marín grabó otro álbum de mambo con el sello Fiesta, seguido por un álbum de boogaloo con la disquera Brunswick, y, finalmente, un álbum de jazz latino con Mañana, un sello pequeño a cargo de Al Santiago, un hombre por quien Orlando Marín siente gran admiración debido a sus contribuciones a la música latina. “Una persona que merece gran reconocimiento es Al Santiago, quien era un gran pensador, ¿sabes? De ideas muy progresistas y de mentalidad abierta a muchas cosas. Le abrió las puertas a Pacheco, a Charlie Palmieri, a Eddie Palmieri, y a muchos más—no tanto para mí porque ya yo había grabado álbumes antes [de Alegre], pero sí me dio la oportunidad de regresar y hacer lo mío”. Aunque Orlando Marín no ha grabado un álbum desde 1970, su banda continúa tocando y rindiendo tributo a la era del mambo y las innumerables bandas y músicos que nunca recibieron su debido reconocimiento en su época. “Todos son reyes”, dijo Marín refiriéndose a sus compañeros de la música latina, muchos de los cuales ya han fallecido. “Cada banda tenía sus seguidores, y para tus seguidores, tú eras el rey”. Notas de portada por Jonathan Reynaldo Bailey