s

Willie Colon

Masterworks El Juicio

$1.50

Willie Colon

Masterworks El Juicio

$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
Ah-Ah/O-No
Pirana
Seguire Sin Ti
Timbalero
Aguanile
Sonando Despierto
Si La Ves
Pan Y Agua (Bread & Water)
Pirana (Single Edit)
Timbalero (Inst. Take 3)
Si La Ves (Take 1)
Pan Y Agua (Single Edit)
By the time that Willie Colón took his group into the Broadway recording studios in late 1971 in order to work on the music of El Juicio, he was in charge of one of the most dynamic groups in Latin music. The transition that Willie and his unbelievable star vocalist Héctor Lavoe had made over the course of the previous four years had tranformed them - from young pretenders mocked by the establishment for their rough-and-ready style, to pioneers of the new salsa sound. The band's personnel had shifted, too. Talented pianist Mark Dimond had been replaced by Joe Torres. This loss could have damaged a band irreparably - but Torres fitted right in and the music continued to grow. 1971 had seen the release of La Gran Fuga, with hits such as "Ghana' E," and also the success of the definitive Christmas album Asalto Navideño. Both LPs showcased Willie, Héctor and the band at the top of their game. This level of success continued with the material of El Juicio, which as Willie explains on this edition's main notes, had been presented onstage during the six months previous to recording. Understandably, the band plays with an almost telepathic understanding. Having access to the master tapes, we were able to go back and examine the group in action on alternate instrumental takes of “Si La Ves” and “Timbalero.” It is interesting to note that these work as instrumentals just as well as the album's only instrumental track - “Pan y Agua (Bread and Water).” “Timbalero” exemplifies Willie’s willingness to absorb the cultures of Africa and the Caribbean. In this outtake, the breakdown is more emphatic, evoking the feel of Jamaican reggae. Although the sessions did not yield any unrelased songs or alternate vocal takes by Héctor - he tended to add his vocals during the final take of a song - these earlier takes are different enough to justify sharing them with the public. We have also chosen to present the edited versions of “Pan y Agua" and “Piraña” that were released in the 45 rpm format. All of El Juicio's tracks with the exception of "Timbalero" were released as singles. The demand from fans, radio DJs and jukebox operators illustrates the level of stardom that Willie and Héctor had achieved. Both Willie and Héctor would move on to even greater success. With its impeccable playing and non-stop selection of hits, this album took the new sound of salsa beyond the borders of New York. EL JUICIO MASTERWORKS I spoke with Willie Colón about El Juicio, an album that Fania Records released in 1972, and he made a confession that I found somewhat disturbing: he said that this one was his last "reckless" recording with Héctor Lavoe. I thought that he was making a mistake, since the following year, he produced the LPs Lo Mato and the second volume of Asalto Navideño. And yet, when compared to El Juicio, these two productions are clearly organic, well articulated and thought out. I realized then that Willie was right. In 1972, at the height of its popularity, the band was playing hundreds of shows in nightclubs across the Americas. Their lives were reckless indeed. "It was - and still is - a record of crazy ideas and rhythmic mutations," explains Willie. "Our perspective was middle-of-the-road. We looked at the dancer in the eyes, knowing how much he could stand, so as to push him to the limits of exhaustion." Examples of this tendency can be found in the descargas "Aguanilé" and "Timbalero," which last six and eight minutes respectively - with timeless contributions by timbalero Louie Romero, Willie and Eric Matos on trombone, and, naturally, Héctor Lavoe with the swing and impishness of his soneos. "I had a club in the Bronx named El Hipocampo, where young kids danced tirelessly," adds Willie. "When we threw 'Aguanilé' or 'Timbalero' at them, we generated marathons that lasted 15 to 20 minutes. The club was on a second floor in Jerome Ave. and Burnside. The smoke and heat were suffocating, but people would not leave. Dancing to those jams was like playing a basketball game, and then stepping out to the merciless cold outside." During that time, Willie and Héctor would play the new songs live for about six months before recording them. "Often, we would come up with new ideas in concert," he says. "Maybe a new section, a chorus or a hook, which would be added to the song. When we finally recorded, the instruments virtually played themselves. You didn't think - wow, I have to hold the steering wheel and press the pedal with my foot. You did everything automatically. When the material is digested in such an organic fashion, the music assumes a swing and a natural flow that cannot be imitated." The rest is history - ready to be tasted and appreciated in the sequence of "Ah-Ah/O-No," the bolero "Seguiré Sin Ti," "Timbalero," "Aguanilé," "Soñando Despierto," "Si La Ves," the instrumental "Pan y Agua," and "Piraña" - the Tite Curet Alonso composition with the peculiarity that the trombones respond to the lyrics performed by Héctor with melodic lines from "Caravan," "Total," "Perfidia," "Llanto De Luna" and other hits. El Juicio also brought in Willie a deep and sincere reflection on the excesses of his life. The train appeared destined to be derailed. He was getting a divorce from María Dávila, and had lost his respect to drugs. He needed a pause, a change. His conscience was shouting to him: "coño, take a break." "All those feelings are reflected in the song lyrics," explains Willie. "They forebode the ruptures of my marriage and my relationship with Héctor. Even in the raucous celebrations like 'Timbalero,' it says that timba no va a soná - the drum will not sound. In other words, it is all over. In the end, 'Pan y Agua' represents the deserved punishment for all this decadence." In 2009, El Juicio represents for Willie Colón a metaphor of reflection for a group of teen musicians with international fame who, when faced with the overwhelming blows of life and its many lessons, they would simply answer: "que se joda!" MASTERWORKS - El Juicio Producer's Note By Dean Rudland Author: Jaime Torres-Torres Cuando Willie Colón llevó a su grupo a los estudios de grabación Broadway a fines de 1971 para trabajar en el disco El Juicio, estaba a cargo de una de las orquestas más dinámicas de la música latina. La transición que Willie y su impactante vocalista Héctor Lavoe habían logrado durante los últimos cuatro años los había transformado - de jóvenes pretendientes burlados por los profesionales de la música tropical, a pioneros de la nueva salsa. Algunos integrantes habían cambiado. El talentoso pianista Mark Dimond había sido reemplazado por Joe Torres. Esta pérdida podría haber dañado a la banda irreparablemente - pero Torres se acomodó y la música no paró de crecer. En 1971 habían salido La Gran Fuga, con éxitos como "Ghana' E", y también el disco navideño por excelencia, Asalto Navideño. Ambos discos demostraron que Willie, Héctor y la banda habían alcanzado una cima de creatividad artística. Este nivel de éxito continuó con el material de El Juicio, que como Willie explica en el comentario principal de esta edición, había sido ensayado en concierto durante seis meses antes de su grabación. Es por esto que la banda toca con una comunicación casi telepática. Teniendo acceso a las cintas de grabación, pudimos localizarlas y ver al grupo en acción en versiones instrumentales de “Si La Ves” y “Timbalero”. Es interesante señalar que funcionan como instrumentales - tan bien como el único tema instrumental del disco terminado, "Pan y Agua". “Timbalero” ejemplifica la habilidad de Willie para absorber las culturas de Africa y el Caribe. Esta toma enfatiza el ritmo, recordando las sonoridades del reggae jamaiquino. Pese a que las sesiones no generaron canciones inéditas o versiones vocales alternativas - Héctor solía grabar su voz durante la última toma - estas versiones iniciales son lo suficientemente diferentes como para incluirlas en este disco. También quisimos presentar las versiones editadas de “Pan y Agua" y “Piraña” que fueron lanzadas en formato de 45 rpm. Todos los temas de El Juicio con la excepción de "Timbalero" fueron lanzados como sencillos. La demanda de fanáticos, programadores de radio y operadores de rocolas demuestra la popularidad que habían alcanzado Willie y Héctor. Willie y Héctor continuarían produciendo éxitos. Con su musicalidad impecable y una selección imparable de éxitos, este disco llevó al nuevo sonido de la salsa más allá de los límites de Nueva York. EL JUICIO MASTERWORKS Conversé con Willie Colón sobre El Juicio, álbum editado por Fania Records en 1972, y su confesión me perturbó: me dijo que fue su última grabación "desenfrenada" junto a Héctor Lavoe. Pensé que se había equivocado porque al año siguiente produjo los elepés Lo Mato y el segundo volumen de Asalto Navideño, pero en comparación con El Juicio, indiscutiblemente son dos producciones orgánicas, muy articuladas y pensadas. Comprendí que Willie tenía razón. En 1972, en la cúspide de su popularidad, la banda amenizaba centenares de bailes en clubes por América. Sus vidas eran desenfrenadas. "Fue (y es) un disco de ideas locas e injertos de ritmos. Nuestra perspectiva fue de una altura mediana, siempre mirando al bailador a los ojos y con el tiempo sabiendo cuánto aguantaba para así llevarlo al límite del agotamiento y el cansancio", contó Willie. Ejemplos indiscutidos son las descargas "Aguanilé" y "Timbalero", de más de seis y ocho minutos de duración, respectivamente, destacándose en ambas el timbalero Louie Romero, Willie y Eric Matos en los trombones y, naturalmente, Héctor Lavoe con su maña y picardía en los soneos. "Yo tenía un club que se llamaba El Hipocampo en el Bronx, donde los chamacos bailaban a la muerte. Cuando le zumbábamos "Aguanilé" o "Timbalero" a veces eran maratones de 15 ó 20 minutos. El club estaba en un segundo piso en la avenida Jerome y Burnside. El humo y el calor eran sofocantes pero la gente no se iba. Bailar esas piezas era como jugarte un partido de baloncesto para después salir afuera a un frío "pela gato", explicó Willie. En esa época Willie y Héctor acostumbraban tocar las canciones nuevas por espacio de seis meses, antes de grabarlas. "En los bailes muchas veces se nos ocurría alguna idea nueva. Quizás una sección nueva, un coro o un gancho, y se agregaba a la canción. Al llegar el día de la grabación los instrumentos se tocaban solos. Es como cuando tú ya sabes manejar una bicicleta. No piensas: "uy, tengo aguantar el manubrio y empujar el pedal con este pie". Todo lo haces automáticamente. Cuando el material llega a ser digerido de esa manera la música coge un swing y una fluidez natural que no se puede imitar". El resto es historia que se puede degustar y apreciar en la secuencia de "Ah-Ah/O-no", el bolero "Seguiré Sin Ti", "Timbalero", "Aguanilé", "Soñando Despierto", "Si La Ves", la pieza instrumental "Pan y Agua" y "Piraña", la composición de Tite Curet que tiene la particularidad de que a cada frase interpretada por Héctor, los trombones responden con líneas melódicas de "Caravan", "Total", "Perfidia", "Llanto De Luna" y otros éxitos. El Juicio, además, entrañó en Willie una reflexión profunda y sincera sobre los excesos de su vida. El tren parecía destinado a descarrilarse. Se divorciaba de María Dávila y le había perdido el respeto a las drogas. Necesitaba una pausa, un cambio. Su conciencia le gritaba: "coño, detente". "Todo eso está reflejado en los textos de las canciones. Son presagios de las rupturas que vienen con mi matrimonio y con Héctor. Hasta en las celebraciones despojadoras, como "Timbalero", se dice que la "timba no va a soná". En otras palabras, todo se acabó. Y, al final, ‘Pan y Agua’ representa el castigo merecido por tantas decadencias". En el 2009, El Juicio representa para Willie Colón la metáfora de la reflexión de un grupo de músicos adolescentes de fama mundial que, a los contundentes golpes de la vida y sus moralejas, simplemente respondían: "!Qué se joda! MASTERWORKS - El Juicio Nota del Productor Dean Rudland Autor: Jaime Torres-Torres