s

Charlie Palmieri

La Herencia

$0.99

Charlie Palmieri

La Herencia

$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
Bronx Pachanga U.S.A.
El Vendedor De Mangos
Lagrimas Y Tristeza
Amor For Two
Estoy Buscando A Kako
Son Sasonao
Fat Papa
La Hija De Lola
Sedante De Rhumba
Coco
Despierta Julian
La Vecina
Panache
El Susto
Tema De Maria Cervantes
Melodica In "F"
In interview after interview, Eddie Palmieri has repeatedly stated that his older brother Charlie was a much better piano player than him. In reality, comparing Charlie and Eddie Palmieri is an exercise in futility. Both are revered as phenomenally talented performers and bandleaders whose lasting influence on the history of Latin music cannot be underestimated. That said, one listen to the 16 tracks on this disc is enough for Afro-Caribbean aficionados to understand what Eddie was talking about when he proudly stated that Charlie was the real Rey De Las Blancas y Las Negras - The King of the Piano Keys. So how were these two giants different from one another? Eddie favored psychedelic chords and dissonant atmospherics. He kept the dancers happy with orgiastic salsa funkathons - but his thirst for experimentation was not easily quenched. Charlie Palmieri, on the other hand, was a more conservative soloist. His spectacular sense of swing was elegant and restrained. There's something velvety about his arrangements - even when his orchestra achieves pinnacles of fiery danceability. Charlie's sound harks back to the delicate dynamics of vintage pianists like Cuba's Peruchín and Puerto Rico's Noro Morales. This compilation follows the evolution of Charlie Palmieri's artistry, from the innocence of his early '60s days with the wonderfully old fashioned Charanga Duboney, the transition from charanga to spirited conjunto in the second half of the '60s, and his blossoming as a progressive bandleader throughout the '70s. Palmieri may not be with us anymore, but his unique sound lives on. His solos - those funky, savage, exhilarating solos - are the highlight of this collection. The son of Puerto Rican parents, Carlos Manuel Palmieri Jr. was born in New York City in 1927. During the '40s and '50s, he made a name for himself in the local Latin scene performing with luminaries such as Tito Puente, Xavier Cugat, Vicentico Valdés and Tito Rodríguez. The first four tracks on this compilation are culled from his classic trio of charanga releases for the Alegre label with the Duboney - the orchestra he created with future Fania founder Johnny Pacheco. Here, Palmieri follows the classic charanga parameters of joyful flute lines and spirited layers of violins, but he also experiments with bossa nova on 1963's self penned "Amor For Two," and delivers an earth shattering bolero on 1962's "Lágrimas y Tristezas," which includes Víctor Velázquez on vocals. The swinging "Estoy Buscando A Kako" was originally included on the first release by the legendary Alegre All Stars, the jam band (and predecessor of the Fania All Stars) of which Palmieri was the piano player and musical director. The humorous "Fat Papa" is the opening track of the 1967 session Either You Have It Or You Don't (Hay Que Estar En Algo), which found the piano player indulging in some silly boogaloo fun as a nod to the predominant trend of the times. In 1969, Palmieri became the musical director of the television show El Mundo De Tito Puente. He also became known as a sympathetic educator, teaching the marvels of Latin music to young people, and collaborated with his brother Eddie on recordings such as the seminal Live At Sing Sing. His psychedelic organ solo on Eddie's Vámonos Pa'l Monte is rightfully considered to be a seminal moment in salsa history. In 1972, the album El Gigante Del Teclado ushered a new era of artistic maturity for Palmieri, who perfected a more sophisticated sound marked by lengthy improvisations, jazzy arrangements and the velvety vocals of Puerto Rican crooner Vitín Avilés. "La Hija De Lola" was Charlie's biggest hit single, covered by many a salsa band in future years. "Sedante De Rhumba" swings mercilessly while maintaining an exquisite air of nostalgia about it. Palmieri's weakness for picaresque narrative songwriting is apparent in 1973's "La Vecina." Performed by a gleeful Avilés, the tune tells the story of a young man whose sensuous neighbor is intent on seducing him. But there's a snag: the woman is married to the infamous Pica Pica (Chop Chop), the barrio's bloodthirsty butcher. Avilés also shines on the buoyant "Despierta Julián," a party anthem marked by an implacable groove, soaring choruses and a sample of Palmieri at his eccentric best: his nearly baroque organ solo is delightfully retro, almost dissonant and thoroughly unexpected. On "El Susto," the opening track of the 1975 album Adelante, Gigante, Avilés sings about sleeping for three days straight after ingesting dozens of oysters and some fish soup too. He is taken for dead and placed in a coffin muy vestidito de negro (very much dressed up in black). Fortunately, he awakens in time to prevent being buried alive. Avilés' gentlemanly delivery, reminiscent of his good friend and compatriot Tito Rodríguez, adds an aristocratic tinge to this tall tale of an unforgettable fiasco. Also included in Adelante, Gigante, Palmieri's version of Noro Morales' “Tema de María Cervantes” is transcendental, particularly during the section when Charlie's hypnotic piano pattern is complemented by Quique Dávila's tasteful timbales solo. Culled from the 1978 session The Heavyweight, "Melodica In 'F'" is an eight-minute descarga that begins on a surprisingly solemn mood, with Charlie performing a plaintive, march-like melody on the melodica framed by fiery brass riffs. A lovely tres interlude is followed by the tune's hypnotic chorus: Para bailar el danzoncito/Hay que tener mucho compás (In order to dance the little danzón/You need to have plenty of rhythm). That's when the tune really comes to life. Boosted by the timbales' staccato cowbell, as well as cries of encouragement from the vocalists, Charlie delivers one of his priceless piano solos - gutsy and sophisticated at the same time. The track ends with some downright dissonant melodica notes and humorous underpinnings, demonstrating that Palmieri was never the kind of bandleader to take himself too seriously. Charlie Palmieri passed away in 1988 at age 60. In subsequent years, new generations of salseros made a name for themselves by capturing the public spotlight, and the remarkable creations of this one-of-a-kind keyboardist were remembered and treasured only by serious Afro-Cuban aficionados. Now, the release of this compilation in the Heritage series gives us an opportunity to rediscover some of the most original and underrated gems in the Fania treasure trove. Written by Ernesto Lechner En más de una oportunidad, Eddie Palmieri ha expresado públicamente la opinión de que su hermano Charlie era mejor pianista que él. En realidad, comparar a Charlie con Eddie Palmieri no tiene sentido. Ambos son considerados eximios intérpretes y directores de orquesta, cuya influencia en la historia de la música latina es incalculable. Dicho esto, basta con escuchar los 16 temas de este disco para que los aficionados de la música afrocaribeña entiendan lo que quiere decir Eddie al afirmar que el verdadero Rey de las Blancas y las Negras era Charlie. ¿Cómo se diferenciaban estos dos gigantes de la música? Eddie usaba acordes psicodélicos y atmósferas disonantes. Complacía a los bailadores con maratones orgiásticos de pura salsa - pero su deseo de experimentación era insaciable. Charlie Palmieri, por otro lado, era un solista más conservado. Su espectacular sentido del swing era elegante y mesurado. Hay algo aterciopelado en sus arreglos - aún cuando su orquesta alcanza un frenesí bailable. El sonido de Charlie nos retrae a la delicada sensibilidad de pioneros del piano como el cubano Peruchín y el puertorriqueño Noro Morales. Esta antología traza la evolución de Charlie Palmieri, desde la inocencia de sus comienzos a principios de los años '60 con la Charanga Duboney, la transición de charanga a conjunto en la segunda mitad de esa década y su florecer como un director de orquesta progresivo a través de los '70. Palmieri no está con nosotros, pero su sonido sobrevive. Sus solos - salvajes, felices, llenos de funk - son, inevitablemente, el momento culminante de esta compilación. Hijo de padres puertorriqueños, Carlos Manuel Palmieri Jr. nació en la ciudad de Nueva York en 1927. Durante las décadas del '40 y '50 desarrolló una sólida reputación en la escena latina local tocando con luminarias del calibre de Tito Puente, Xavier Cugat, Vicentico Valdés y Tito Rodríguez. Los primeros cuatro temas en esta compilación provienen del trío de discos de charanga que Charlie grabó para la disquera Alegre con La Duboney - la orquesta que creó con el futuro fundador de la Fania, Johnny Pacheco. Aquí, Palmieri sigue los parámetros clásicos de la charanga con alegres solos de flauta traversa y dulces violines, pero también experimenta con la bossa nova en su composición de 1963, "Amor For Two". También nos regala un impactante bolero en 1962 con "Lágrimas y Tristezas", con Víctor Velázquez como cantante. Un tema rebosante de swing, "Estoy Buscando A Kako" fue incluido originalmente en el lanzamiento debut de la legendaria Alegre All Stars, la banda que anticipó la aparición de la Fania All Stars y de la cual Palmieri era pianista y director musical. El gracioso "Fat Papa" es el tema de apertura de la sesión Either You Have It Or You Don't (Hay Que Estar En Algo) de 1967, que encuentra al pianista coqueteando con el estilo del bugalú, que tan de moda estaba en ese momento. En 1969, Palmieri fue contratado como director musical del programa televisivo El Mundo De Tito Puente. También se dio a conocer como un dedicado maestro, enseñando las maravillas de la música latina a los más jóvenes. Y colaboró con su hermano Eddie en grabaciones históricas como Live At Sing Sing. Su solo de órgano en la canción Vámonos Pa'l Monte de Eddie es un momento clave dentro de la historia de la salsa. En 1972, el LP El Gigante del Teclado introdujo una nueva era de madurez artística para Palmieri, que perfeccionó un sonido sofisticado y repleto de extensas improvisaciones, arreglos jazzeros y la aterciopelada voz del cantante puertorriqueño Vitín Avilés. "La Hija De Lola" fue el más grande éxito de su carrera, interpretado por infinidad de futuras bandas salseras. "Sedante De Rhumba" tiene un swing implacable, al mismo tiempo que evoca un exquisito aire de nostalgia. La debilidad de Palmieri hacia las canciones con narrativas picarescas resulta evidente en el tema "La Vecina" de 1973. Interpretada con gusto por Avilés, la canción narra la historia de un joven cuya sensual vecina intenta seducirlo. El problema es que la mujer está casada con Pica Pica, el sanguinario carnicero del barrio. Avilés también brilla en el melodioso "Despierta Julián", un tema que invita a bailar con su ritmo fogoso, un coro afiebrado y un ejemplo extremo del arte de Charlie Palmieri: el solo de órgano en este tema es casi barroco y disonante. En "El Susto", el tema que da comienzo al disco de 1975 Adelante, Gigante, Avilés cuenta haberse quedado dormido después de comer ‘docenas de ostiones y sopa de pescado’. Sus amigos lo toman por muerto y lo colocan en un féretro muy vestidito de negro. Afortunadamente, nuestro héroe despierta a tiempo y evita que lo entierren vivo. El estilo caballeroso de Avilés, que tanto nos recuerda a su compatriota y amigo Tito Rodríguez, le agrega una pizca de artistocracia a esta anécdota de un fiasco inolvidable. También incluida en Adelante, Gigante, la versión de Palmieri del “Tema de María Cervantes” de Noro Morales es trascendental, especialmente cuando el hipnótico piano de Charlie es aderezado con un fino solo de timbales de la mano de Quique Dávila. Proveniente de The Heavyweight de 1978, "Melodica In 'F'" es una descarga de ocho minutos que empieza con un clima sorprendentemente solemne. Charlie interpreta una melodía parecida a una marcha en la melódica, rodeado de fogosos riffs de la sección de vientos. Después de un breve interludio de la mano de un tres, llega el hipnótico coro de la canción: Para bailar el danzoncito/Hay que tener mucho compás. Y el tema cobra vida. Alentado por el campaneo de los timbales y los gritos de sus compañeros, Charlie nos regala uno de sus impresionantes solos de piano - elegante y estremecedor. La fiesta termina con notas disonantes de la melódica y algunos detalles humorísticos, demostrando que Charlie Palmieri era el tipo de director de orquesta que nunca se tomaba a sí mismo demasiado en serio. Charlie Palmieri falleció en 1988 después de sufrir problemas de corazón durante mucho tiempo. Tenía sólo 60 años. En las décadas que transcurrieron desde entonces, nuevas generaciones de salseros cosecharon el afecto del público, y las milagrosas creaciones de Charlie han sido atesoradas sólo por los más dedicados fanáticos de la música afrocaribeña. Ahora, el lanzamiento de esta antología nos permite redescubrir el genio de un verdadero gigante de la música latina. Escrito por Ernesto Lechner