s

Joe Cuba

Joe Cuba - Greatest Hits

$1.29

Joe Cuba

Joe Cuba - Greatest Hits

$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
El Pito (I'll Never Go Back To Georgia)
Bang! Bang!
Aprieta (Oye Como Va)
Cachondea
So What?
Gimme Some Love
Around The World
Wabble-Cha
To Be With You
El Ratón
Mujer Divina
Sock It To Me
Ain't It Funny What Love Can Do
Oh Yeah
Clave Mambo
La Palomilla
Soy Pilongo
A Las Seis
Ariñañara
Mi Salsa Buena
Salsa Ahí Na' Ma'
Pataquibiriquambambaram
The Joe Cuba Sextet recorded countless hits across the decades, each embodying the soul of Spanish Harlem and capturing the sounds of the first generation of New York Puerto Ricans. With hustler instincts, Joe and his band—originally consisting of Jimmy Sabater on timbales and vocals, Tommy Berrios on vibes, Nick Jiménez on piano, Roy Rosa on bass (replaced early on by Jules Cordero), and Willie Torres on vocals—reinvented the Latin sound several times over. There’s little doubt that salsa owes its swagger and swing to Joe Cuba. Joe’s pride for his neighborhood spilled over into his playing, made his sound contagious, and birthed a movement reflective of Spanish Harlem’s vibrant soul. Joe’s unique childhood gave him a cross-cultural perspective that would later imbue his music. Born to Puerto Rican parents struggling to survive the Great Depression, a young Gilberto Navarro (later, Calderón) and his brother grew up in foster care with a White, English-speaking family on Staten Island. After five years, Joe and his brother were reunited with their mother, Gloria, in Spanish Harlem, where he first heard Spanish being spoken. Rediscovering his language and roots at such a young age gave Joe a special appreciation of his heritage. As Joe stepped off the Six train on 116th Street and Lexington Avenue, the joys of Spanish Harlem unfolded before him. “It was beautiful. Record shops lined 116th Street, music blasting from their shops,” Joe remembered of his first experience at his new home. “It was a real community, a real neighborhood. Doors were always open, everyone would visit each other, and there was always a nice plate of rice and beans ready.” It was these memories, recuerdos de su barrio, that Joe later infused into his music. New to the hood, Joe earned his stripes sliding hard into makeshift bases while playing stickball on the concrete of 116th Street—they would run away from police in the back-ally canyons of Spanish Harlem when games would get broken up; they would chill on stoops in the evening and kick game to the girls from around the way. He started his music career at the end of his stickball career: “I broke my leg sliding into second base, and I was in a cast for a while. So a friend of mine lent me his conga, and I would practice to Machito records.” Like many aspiring Latino musicians in the U.S. at that time, Joe found inspiration in the Cuban-born Latin jazz legend Machito, but growing up next door to the scene’s future talent also helped. “There were a lot of musicians on my block,” he said. “Santo Miranda, Negrito Pantoja, and Sabu Martinez, these guys would hang out on the block and motivate me.” When Sabu Martinez took a job in Hollywood, Joe replaced him and became the conguero for La Alfarona X, New York City’s first Puerto Rican trumpet conjunto. It was a short stint (Sabu eventually came back to claim his spot in the band), but Joe got a taste of what it was like to be a musician: “If you were a regular guy, the girls would just walk by, but if you were playing an instrument and singing a coro, they’d stop! And then you could rap to them.” From the beginning, Joe’s band stood out, unconventionally using vibes in their arrangements. “Soy Pilongo,” one of Joe’s earliest recorded songs, features the band’s trademark vibes—riding cool on the montuno, contrasting the horns, and accenting the handclap break—a foreshadowing of the band’s nascent boogaloo sound. Eventually, Joe would drop the horns entirely, in favor of vibes, another unexpected but practical decision: “If I had horns, the police would shut us down, so I used vibes to keep the police from coming—problem fixed.” With a quieter and smaller ensemble, Joe and his band carved a niche for themselves playing side by side with Machito, Tito Puente, and Tito Rodríguez at the popular Latin band clubs like the Palladium, and they quickly earned a spot on the Catskill circuit. The band gained momentum after sonero José “Cheo” Feliciano replaced Willie Torres in 1958. Cheo’s swingin’ and smooth singing in Spanish complemented Jimmy Sabater’s crooner-style English vocals, giving the band appeal to both English and Spanish audiences. “Cheo had a thick accent; that’s when they put me in to sing in English,” Jimmy remembers. “Cheo would sing one bolero in Spanish, and I would sing one in English.” It was this combination that made the sextet’s Seeco Records debut, Steppin’ Out, a crossover hit. Laced with hits like “A las Seis” and “To Be With You,” Steppin’ Out displayed the band’s bilingual versatility and dual shades of Nuyorican soul. The band perfected their bilingual harmony with “Bang! Bang!” the monster hit that inspired Latin soul and boogaloo, striking a chord with New York’s growing bilingual Puerto Rican community. Gritty and slightly offbeat, “Bang! Bang!” was a tour of Harlem put to music. A mid-tempo montuno drives the tune as a group of boys “beep-beep” to the nonsensical chorus of “corn bread, hog maw, and chitterlings.” Cheo adds his occasional interruptions of “lechón” or “cuchifrito,” adding his favorite Puerto Rican soul food to the mix. The love for home and the swagger that the Joe Cuba Sextet brought to their music inspired the same pride, love, and attitude in younger musicians. Joe’s infectious new sound was the catalyst for the boogaloo. “My group put that soul into the the music,” Joe said. “We were the first to do it that way.” But this Nuyorican soul went beyond the boogaloo. Infusing the sights and sounds of Spanish Harlem into the music is what made salsa distinctly New York and different from other styles of Latin music that came before it. While older musicians like Tito Puente resisted, Joe embraced the R&B aspects that were creeping into the Latin music scene. “I always mixed it up on my records: something in English, something a little soulful, something a little funky. But I always stuck by my salsa.” “Mi Salsa Buena,” from his last Tico album, 1979’s El Pirata del Caribe, is testament to Joe’s loyalty. It’s a slow-building tribute to salsa’s Puerto Rican roots that explodes midway into a proper New York dance-floor monster. For all his pride, Joe never took all the credit for salsa himself. He recognized the work put in before him and the contributions of his peers: “In the ’50s, our music broke out, especially when Rodríguez, Puente, and Machito started opening doors downtown at the Palladium; and then I came along with my sound, and Eddie [Palmieri] came with his trombone, and Pacheco started Fania; we were building.” More than his innovation to New York Latin music, Joe will always be remembered for the love he brought to his music. For him, fame was secondary; representing his barrio and the joy of playing were enough. “The beauty about it was, in those days, it was a pretty happy-go-lucky environment,” Joe said. “We played because we loved the music, and because it was a joy to play.” It’s this joy that Joe still shares. On a good summer day, if you get off the Six train on 116th Street and Lexington in Spanish Harlem, you’re sure to hear Joe’s music playing loud from some of the same record shops of his youth. Liner notes by Kristofer RíosEl Sexteto de Joe Cuba grabó innumerables éxitos a través de las décadas, cada uno representando el alma de Spanish Harlem y capturando los sonidos de la primera generación de puertorriqueños neoyorquinos. Con sus instintos bravos, Joe y su banda—la cual consistía originalmente de Jimmy Sabater en los timbales y vocalización, Tommy Berrios en el vibráfono, Nick Jiménez en el piano, Roy Rosa en el bajo (reemplazado poco después por Jules Cordero), y el vocalista Willie Torres—reinventaron el sonido Latino una y otra vez. No cabe duda de que la salsa le debe su vaivén y su swing a Joe Cuba. El orgullo que Joe sentía por su barrio contaminó su forma de tocar, convirtió su sonido en algo contagioso, y dio a nacer un movimiento que reflejaba el alma vibrante de Spanish Harlem. La niñez particular de Joe le proporcionó una perspectiva intercultural que más tarde impregnaría su música. Hijo de padres puertorriqueños que luchaban por sobrevivir la Gran Depresión, el joven Gilberto Navarro (más adelante Calderón) y su hermano crecieron en el hogar de acogida de una familia blanca de habla inglesa en Staten Island. Al cabo de cinco años, Joe y su hermano fueron reunidos con su madre Gloria en Spanish Harlem, donde por primera vez escuchó el idioma español. El descubrir nuevamente su idioma y sus raíces a tan temprana edad causó que Joe adquiriese una gran apreciación por su herencia. Mientras Joe se bajaba del tren en la calle 116 y la avenida Lexington, las maravillas de Spanish Harlem se vislumbraban frente a sus ojos. “Era algo hermoso. Tiendas de discos alineaban la calle 116, y se oía música en cada una de ellas”, recordó Joe sobre su primera experiencia en su nuevo hogar. “Era una verdadera comunidad. Las puertas siempre estaban abiertas, todos nos visitábamos, y siempre estaba listo un buen plato de arroz y habichuelas”. Fueron estas memorias, los recuerdos de su barrio, que Joe incorporó a su música. Siendo nuevo en el barrio, Joe se dio a respetar deslizándose en bases improvisadas mientras jugaba béisbol callejero en el cemento de la calle 116—huían de la policía en los enormes callejones de Spanish Harlem cuando se interrumpían los juegos; en la noche se sentaban en los escalones de los apartamentos y piropeaban a las muchachas del área. Comenzó su carrera musical al terminar su carrera como jugador: “Me rompí la pierna deslizándome en segunda base, y tuve puesto un yeso por un tiempo. Así que un amigo me prestó su conga y yo practicaba siguiendo los discos de Machito”. A igual que muchos músicos latinos aspirantes de esa época en los Estados Unidos, Joe encontró su inspiración en Machito, leyenda cubana del jazz latino, pero también le ayudó el criarse al lado de futuros talentos del género. “En mi cuadra había un montón de músicos”, dijo. “Santo Miranda, Negrito Pantoja y Sabú Martínez, esos tipos pasaban el rato conmigo en la cuadra, y me motivaban”. Cuando Sabú Martínez consiguió trabajo en Hollywood, Joe lo reemplazó y se convirtió en el conguero de La Alfarona X, el primer conjunto de trompetas puertorriqueño de Nueva York. El puesto no duró mucho tiempo (Sabú regresó eventualmente a reclamar su lugar en la banda), pero Joe pudo saborear lo que era ser músico: “Si tú eras un tipo regular, las muchachas simplemente te pasaban por el lado, pero si tocabas un instrumento y cantabas en un coro, ¡paraban! Y entonces sí podías conversar con ellas”. Desde el principio la banda de Joe se destacó, utilizando vibráfonos en sus arreglos de manera poco convencional. En “Soy Pilongo”, una de las primeras grabaciones de Joe, se escucha el vibráfono típico de la banda—suavemente en el montuno, contrastando los instrumentos de viento y acentuando el ritmo de los aplausos—presagiando el naciente sonido boogaloo de la banda. Joe dejaría eventualmente los vientos por completo a favor del vibráfono, otra decisión inesperada pero práctica. “Si había trompetas, la policía nos botaba, así es que usé el vibráfono para evitar que vinieran—y problema resuelto”. Con un grupo menos ruidoso y más pequeño, Joe y su banda tallaron un nicho para sí mismos tocando junto a Machito, Tito Puente, y Tito Rodríguez en clubes latinos populares como el Palladium, y se ganaron rápidamente un lugar en el circuito de las Catskills. La banda ganó impulso luego de que el sonero José “Cheo” Feliciano reemplazara a Willie Torres en 1958. La manera suave y sutil de Cheo al cantar en español complementaba el estilo crooner en inglés de Sabater, lo cual gustaba tanto a las audiencias de habla hispana como las de habla inglesa. “Cheo tenía un acento bien fuerte; fue entonces cuando me pusieron a cantar en inglés”, recuerda Jimmy. Cheo cantaba un bolero en español, y yo cantaba uno en inglés”. Fue esta combinación la que causó que Steppin’ Out, el debut del sexteto con Seeco Records, fuera un éxito en los mercados de ambos idiomas. Con temas como “A las Seis” y “To Be With You”, Steppin’ Out demostró la versatilidad bilingüe de la banda y el doble matiz del alma nuyorican. La banda perfeccionó su armonía bilingüe con “Bang! Bang!”, el rotundo éxito que inspiró el soul latino y el boogaloo, alcanzando a la creciente comunidad bilingüe puertorriqueña de Nueva York. Áspera y levemente fuera de ritmo, “Bang! Bang!” era una vuelta por Harlem hecha música. Un montuno a medio tiempo impulsa la canción mientras un grupo de niños canta “bip bip” al ritmo del coro sin sentido de “corn bread, hog maw, and chitterlings”. Cheo interrumpe ocasionalmente con “lechón” y “cuchifrito”, añadiendo a esta mezcla su comida típica puertorriqueña favorita. El amor por el hogar y la actitud que trajo a su música el Sexteto de Joe Cuba inspiraron el mismo orgullo, amor y actitud en los músicos más jóvenes. El sonido infeccioso de Joe fue el catalizador para el boogaloo. “Mi grupo puso ese sentimiento dentro de la música”, dijo Joe. “Fuimos los primeros en hacerlo así”. Pero este nuyorican soul llegó más allá que el boogaloo. La infusión de los panoramas y los sonidos de Spanish Harlem dentro de la música es lo que hizo a la salsa claramente producto de Nueva York, y diferente a los otros tipos de música latina que surgieron antes. Mientras los músicos de mayor edad como Tito Puente se resistían, Joe se acogió a los aspectos de la música R&B que permeaban la música latina del momento. “Siempre mezclé un poco de todo en mis discos: algo en inglés, algo un poquito sentimental, algo un poquito funky. Pero nunca abandoné a mi salsa”. “Mi Salsa Buena”, de El Pirata del Caribe, su último álbum con Tico de 1979, es testimonio de la lealtad de Joe. Es un tributo, elaborado lentamente, a las raíces puertorriqueñas de la salsa, que explota a medio camino para convertirse en todo un monstruo digno de los salones de baile de Nueva York. A pesar de su orgullo, Joe nunca tomó todo el crédito por la creación de la salsa. Reconoció todo el trabajo que se llevó a cabo antes que el de él, y los aportes de sus compañeros. “En los años 50 nuestra música estalló, especialmente cuando Rodríguez, Puente y Machito comenzaron a abrir puertas en el downtown en el Palladium, y entonces llegué yo con mi sonido, y Eddie [Palmieri] llegó con su trombón, y Pacheco fundó a Fania. Estábamos construyendo”. Más que por su innovación a la música latina de Nueva York, Joe será recordado siempre por el amor que le trajo a su música. Para él, la fama era tema secundario; representar a su barrio y el placer de tocar eran suficiente. “Lo mejor de todo era que, en aquel entonces, el ambiente era bien agradable”, dijo Joe. “Tocábamos porque amábamos la música, y porque tocar nos hacía felices.” Esta felicidad la comparte Joe hasta el día de hoy. Durante un bello día de verano, si usted se baja del tren 6 en la calle 116 y Lexington en Spanish Harlem, seguramente escuchará la música de Joe saliendo a todo volumen de alguna de las tiendas de discos de su juventud. Notas de portada: Kristofer Ríos