s

Joe Cuba

Joe Cuba - El Alcalde Del Barrio

$19.99

Joe Cuba

Joe Cuba - El Alcalde Del Barrio

$19.99 Album
$19.99 Album
$19.99 Album

It was the evening of Sunday, February 15, 2009, when I was informed of the passing of Joe “Sonny” Cuba. Ironically, I had been working on these very liner notes at the time and had been speaking with him on a regular basis, seeking his input in preparation of this album. Regrettably, Joe suffered from a multitude of ailments and was not allowed the opportunity to appreciate this tribute to his works. Joe Cuba was born Gilberto Navarro on April 22, 1931, in Spanish Harlem, New York City, where his Puerto Rican parents had moved in the late ’20s. Due to the tough times of the Great Depression, his mother, Gloria, was forced to place Gilbert and his older brother, Jack, in a foster home after his father abandoned the family. The following year, the boys were taken in by an Italian family, the Liottas from Staten Island, where they learned to enjoy suburban life. When Gilbert was five, his mom, who was a frequent visitor, remarried and reclaimed her children, much to the dismay of the Liotta family and the boys, who had grown accustomed to the lifestyle. Gilbert had picked up the nickname Sonny from Mrs. Liotta—who adored him and thought he was exceptionally bright—but he would soon take on the surname of his new stepfather, Miguel Calderón. In the coming years, Gilbert and Jack had to acclimate to life in Spanish Harlem. Luckily, their stepfather was a good man who owned a candy store on 115th Street in El Barrio, and Gilbert got to help out. Captivated by the conga playing of Sabu Martinez, Gilbert took the opportunity to learn the instrument while recovering from a broken leg suffered playing stickball. Gilbert jammed in the street until given the chance to replace Sabu for a few months in the local band La Alfarona X in 1950. Shortly after, he joined Spanish Harlem’s Joe Panama Quintet, where Jimmy Sabater was a timbales player. After recruiting vibraphonist Tommy Berrios, Gilbert and the band had a falling out with Panama and formed the Cha Cha Boys with Gilbert Calderón as the bandleader. Much to his surprise, Gilbert would soon be billed as “Joe Cuba” by his promoter, Catalino Rolón, and the name would stick. Once fully established, the Joe Cuba Sextet lineup included Tommy Berrios on vibes, Nick Jiménez on piano and serving as arranger, Jules “Slim” Cordero on bass, and timbalero Jimmy Sabater sharing vocal duties with newly added Willie Torres. In 1965, Torres would leave the group to join José Curbelo’s orchestra, replacing Santos Colón who had left to join Tito Puente. José “Cheo” Feliciano took over Willie’s role in the Joe Cuba Sextet until 1966, when he left, only to be replaced by Willie Torres. The material on this two-disc compilation is truly exceptional. It includes recordings from the Seeco, Mardi-Gras, Tico, and Fania labels, providing you an accurate assemblage of Joe Cuba recordings never previously compiled in album form. Joe always felt that his music should be appreciated equally by the Anglo market as well as his countless Latin devotees and often employed English lyrics to appeal to his American and young Latino fan base. He unquestionably accomplished that with international hits like “Bang Bang” and “El Pito (I’ll Never Go Back to Georgia).” As architect of the Joe Cuba sound, Joe was adept at creating pure excitement in all of his 240 recorded titles. Few entertainers can claim to have performed at Carnegie Hall, the Apollo Theater, Hollywood Palladium, Madison Square Garden, and the Caribbean Pavilion at the 1964 World’s Fair, but Joe certainly could. Listen to “Boom Boom Lucumi” and witness the electricity that Joe conveyed to his many fans whenever he performed. Joe had the innate ability to make those performing with him shine; they worked with maximum vigor while playing for the Joe Cuba Sextet. And Joe himself was always thinking a few steps ahead. I recall one occasion when, after remixing a tune with Joe, he pulled two three-inch speakers from a bag and asked the engineer, Jon Fausty, to play the final mix through these miniature speakers. In amazement, Jon and I stared at each other. “My fans listen to my music through portable radios on Orchard Beach,” Joe explained. “If the final mix sounds good through these speakers, it’ll sound great on the beach.” Jon and I learned a valuable lesson that day. The first time I saw Joe Cuba was at the 1964 World’s Fair in Queens, New York. I was captivated by his performance and became an instant fan. Two years later, I found myself eagerly attending a rehearsal for his upcoming My Man Speedy! album in his home in Baldwin, Long Island, accompanied by my writing partner—vibraphonist, percussionist, arranger, and composer Louie Ramírez—who had informed me that Joe was looking for new material for an album. That following week, being in the presence of Jimmy Sabater, Willie Torres, Nicky Jiménez, and Slim Cordero became one of the highlights of my life. During his waning days, Joe worked on a manuscript depicting special incidents experienced during his fascinating journey through life. He unpretentiously felt a movie describing his life in El Barrio and escapades throughout his illustrious career would be of particular interest to the public. Hopefully, this will come to fruition some day. The Joe Cuba Sextet enjoyed life to the fullest. They joked, laughed, and teased each other constantly. I recall one evening when Sonny and Jimmy joined me at a cocktail party I had arranged for Brazilian vocalist Nelson Ned, who, despite his diminutive size, possessed a gargantuan singing voice. As Nelson stood and proposed a toast to his many admirers, Sonny whispered to me, “You’d think the guy would have enough class to stand up while addressing his guests.” That was Joe Cuba, his humor and passion for life both relentless and contagious—everyone wanted to be with him, around him, and a part of whatever he was into. He led an extraordinary life and left behind a legacy of wonderful music for us to take pleasure in, as you will discover upon listening to this album. His presence will be eternally missed, but his spirit remains with those fortunate to have known him. The compilation opens with “Do You Feel It,” a song in which Joe’s exceptional narration expresses his exploits and eternal love for the place where he was recognized as “El Alcalde” (the mayor) of his beloved barrio in Spanish Harlem, New York City. This provocative cut from 1972’s Bustin’ Out features the superb singing of Ray Pollard, who gives a slightly pessimistic account of his days as a Black man wanting to leave El Barrio to find a better life. I took the liberty, with Joe’s blessing, of urbanizing this cut by doing some overdubbing and editing, giving the cut a more contemporary approach. When Willie Torres replaced the illustrious Cheo Feliciano as vocalist, the band didn’t miss a beat, as is illustrated superbly by Willie’s vocal on “Hey Joe, Hey Joe.” With the addition of Torres, an underrated singer and writer, the band went on to become one of the most sought-after acts, with Willie being a big part of the crossover sound that Joe Cuba is identified with. In 1964, “Bang Bang” was introduced during a Joe Cuba Sextet performance at New York’s Gardens Club (years before it became the celebrated Cheetah nightclub). During an intermission, Joe’s timbalero/vocalist, Jimmy Sabater, noticed a lack of interest in their music by the predominantly African American attendees. Jimmy approached Joe and pianist Nicky Jiménez with the idea of coming up with a sound that could get the spectators on the dance floor. What they came up with was the vamp you hear at the beginning of the tune. Jimmy bet Sonny a beer that it would work, and they opened up the set with it. From there, they winged it as they noticed the dance floor fill up and the dancers chanting “She freaks, ah! She freaks, ah!” during the musical breaks. The crowd was wild and wouldn’t let the band put an end to their fun, so they kept extending the song to the dancers’ delight. A phenomenon was created that night. The following day, Joe called a rehearsal for the band with the idea of creating a proper arrangement for “Bang Bang,” in which he added “Bi bi, ah! Bi bi, ah!” to the mix. The next day, he had to convince Tico label owner Morris Levy to let him record the song and include it in his upcoming album, Wanted Dead or Alive, more commonly referred to as Bang! Bang! Push, Push, Push. Levy was not the easiest record executive to influence, but Joe Cuba seemed to always get what he wanted from Morris. The song was introduced on the album, creating a national blockbuster hit and prompting other bandleaders like Pete Rodríguez, Richie Ray, Johnny Colon, and Joe Bataan to join the bandwagon (no pun intended) and give the youthful record buyers of that era a type of music they would treasure and call the Latin boogaloo. Sonny decided to include eight-year-olds Hector Rivera Jr. and Nicky Jiménez Jr. in the chorus, giving it a more street sound, despite the objections of producer Pancho Cristal. He also used an overhead boom-operated microphone to give it more of a “live” sound. Joe Cuba was a great visionary and knew how to use various gimmicks and interesting rhythm breaks to enhance his recordings. The adeptness of Joe Cuba’s background vocalists is wonderfully demonstrated in the bolero/ballad “It’s Love,” featuring the harmonies of Jimmy Sabater, Willie Torres, and Ray Pollard. The tune showcases the dynamic trio’s ability to sing background doo-wop accompaniment as well as three-part crooning à la old-style groups like the Lettermen and the Four Aces. Very few bands can excite the best dancers with their mambo and salsa renditions as well as perform first-rate romantic ballads with such dexterity. In 1966, Joe Cuba released a tune that would become one of the biggest hits of its time, “El Pito (I’ll Never Go Back to Georgia),” cowritten by Jimmy Sabater. Featuring the renowned Cheo Feliciano on vocals, the song also has an addictive break that includes melodic whistling. Joe, always on top of gimmicks to help promote his hits, had thousands of “El Pito” whistles manufactured to distribute to his fans. Nina Calderón, Joe’s wife, recalls how, in 1967, they furiously unpacked five thousand of these novelty whistles to hand out during a performance of “El Pito” at New York’s Madison Square Garden while touring with the James Brown show. During the performance, they hurled thousands of whistles from the stage, causing a mild uprising with people running down the aisles trying to get their hands on a Joe Cuba “El Pito” whistle. Later, after having his own set blemished by all the whistle-blowing going on during his performance, James Brown was heard uttering, “That motherfucker will never work with me again!” When “My Man Speedy!” was recorded, the band was riding high. Louie Ramírez had replaced the then recently deceased vibraphonist Tommy Berrios. Louie’s influence is recognized early in the tune with his mimicry of popular bandleader Kako, while lead singer Willie Torres does a brilliant impersonation of the cartoon character Speedy Gonzalez. “Psychedelic Baby” is a song I had composed with the title “Hey Hey Girl.” But Sonny wanted to join the hippy/psychedelic movement of that era, so he re-titled the song. He thought it was a good idea to have me do a duet with Willie Torres, which seemed to work, in spite of this writer’s lack of singing talent. But Willie was instrumental in giving me the confidence to perform on this recording and others to come. In “A Thousand Ways,” Joe demonstrates his fondness for doo-wop music in this interpretation of the Nicky Jiménez ballad. Notice how well the background vocalists sing in unison and then harmonize in the bridge of the tune. You’ll also hear a Joe Cuba narration a couple of times in this selection. Ray Pollard’s polished lead vocals are featured in “Ain’t It Funny What Love Can Do.” Selected for obvious reasons to cross over to the pop market, this tune shows the band’s versatility in covering various genres of the music spectrum. Ray grew up as an exceptional doo-wop singer with some of the top groups of the ’50s. “Swinging Mambo” is from a 1956 recording, I Tried to Dance All Night on the Mardi-Gras label. Early in his career, Joe Cuba employed the use of trumpets in his band, evident in this cut. The melodic vocal performances and Joe’s distinctive breaks are noticeable throughout as well. Willie Torres and the chorus of English lyrics helped Joe Cuba’s infiltration into the Jewish and Italian markets in New York and, later, throughout the country. One of Joe Cuba’s most requested recordings is “Wabble-Cha,” a very danceable number featuring a beautiful vibes solo by Tommy Berrios and vocals by Cheo Feliciano. The ubiquitous, clever chorus lines add to the overall pleasant color of this recording. Joe Cuba notwithstanding, Jimmy Sabater is the soul of the band. His cleverness and creativity has always been a vital part of the Joe Cuba sound, and his proficiency as a percussionist has been indispensable to the rhythm section. Additionally, Jimmy is a splendid vocalist and composer, proficient in singing salsa as a sonero and an accomplished crooner in his own right. Influenced by his admiration for the late Nat King Cole, Jimmy learned at an early age how to meld his personal style into his recordings. Jimmy has recorded albums under his own name and led his own group after leaving Joe Cuba. In “I’m Insane,” a Louie Ramírez composition, Jimmy’s velvet voice shines while Ray Pollard’s tenor voice and Louie’s vibes provide expert accompaniment. Always a Latin dancer’s favorite, and a recording utilized by many mambo instructors around the world, “Ariñañara” is a true party record. The rhythm section takes command of this number along with the wonderful vocal interpretation by Cheo. Notice the prominence of the claves throughout. Willie Garcia provides the exciting vocal on Hecho y Derecho’s “La Calle Esta Durisima,” which is often confused with the earlier recording “A Las Seis,” featuring Cheo on the vocal. Recorded years later in 1973 with Phil Diaz on vibes, the pace is faster and more danceable. The rhythm is tight as usual and the breaks as clever as ever. “Macorina” has a definite pachanga feel to it, which was all the rage when this was recorded circa 1960. Atypical of the conventional flute and violins sound, the recording still wants you to get up and do the pachanga, hopping around the dance floor while waving a handkerchief. Tommy Berrios adroitly uses the vibes as a percussion instrument, helping to drive the tune. Cheo and the rhythm breaks are the icing on the cake in this forceful cut. In 1967, Joe wanted to pay tribute to his vocalist, Jimmy Sabater, by producing Joe Cuba Presents the Velvet Voice of Jimmy Sabater. From this album comes the classic bolero “Los Dos,” expertly interpreted by Jimmy. We round out disc one with one of Joe’s favorites, “Y Joe Cuba Ya Llego,” with vocals by Mike Guagenti. This 1979 recording was taken from Joe’s last recording for the Tico label, El Pirata del Caribe. In this cut, Joe displays his skills as a conguero during a swingin’ vamp while the coro chants “Hey Joe.” In 1974, artists from the Tico and Alegre record labels were presented in a concert at the world-renowned Carnegie Hall in New York City. One of the key performers of the affair was the Joe Cuba Sextet. After an introduction by Symphony Sid, Joe took the microphone and electrified the crowd prior to his performance of “Boom Boom Lucumi.” Once again, the Joe Cuba Sextet proved to be the most popular performer of the evening. Another popular recording by Joe Cuba with Cheo Feliciano on the vocals is “A las Seis.” With the chorus singing about their beloved Puerto Rico, Cheo reminds his date to be ready at six o’clock to go out pachangeando. Notice the distinctive way the vibes and piano drive the rhythm section during the montuno of the song. Also, listen to Cheo as he creates his own horn lines during the mambo. Cheo Feliciano singing in English? Yep, in this pop recording of “Remember Me,” Joe decided to use Cheo to sing the lead instead of his customary English-language vocalists, Jimmy Sabater or Willie Torres. Although the tune opens with a calypso feel, the background vocals provide a doo-wop sound that accompanies Cheo superbly on this track from the 1964 Seeco album Diggin’ the Most. Cheo Feliciano ultimately left the group to start a solo career and became one of the premier romantic vocalists of Latin music, reminiscent of the great Tito Rodríguez. In “Aunque Tú,” also taken from Diggin’ the Most, Cheo demonstrates the special way he handles a romantic bolero. The early Mardi-Gras adaptation of the classic Brown and Freed composition “Temptation” features the unison singing of the chorus with a step-out by Willie Torres and a fine vibes solo by Berrios. “La Malanga Brava,” another popular Joe Cuba recording, features a hard-driving rhythm section with ever-present electrifying breaks. Willie and Cheo sing on this track from 1966’s Wanted Dead or Alive. One more Joe Cuba favorite from his early recordings is the “Joe Cuba Mambo,” featuring Jimmy Sabater on the timbales. On this 1956 Mardi-Gras recording, you’ll hear horns, which were part of the ensemble before the group was downsized to a sextet consisting of bass, piano, conga, timbales, and vibes, with Willie singing and playing percussion. Of all Joe Cuba recordings, one particularly stands out as a genuine ultra-romantic classic bolero, “To Be With You” from 1962’s Steppin’ Out, though originally composed in 1956 by pianist Nicky Jiménez and vocalist Willie Torres. Sonny’s surprise decision to choose the inimitable Jimmy Sabater over Cheo reaped many rewards for the band. The song went on to become the wedding song for many young Latin couples. In 1969, for Salsa Records, I produced a disco version of “To Be With You,” vocalized capably, once again, by Jimmy Sabater. The record, which was a hit in New York, was one of the very first 12-inch 45 rpm singles ever manufactured. “Hecho y Derecho,” from Joe’s 1973 Doin’ It Right album, showcases the vocals of Willie García, husband of the fabulous vocalist La Lupe at the time. It’s a swinging mambo that dancers established as one of their favorites. From Joe’s third Mardi-Gras album, entitled Red, Hot and Cha Cha Cha (likely recorded and released circa 1961, though often cited as a 1965 release), comes the hot mambo “Componte Cundunga.” Cheo sings lead while Jimmy and Tommy solo on timbales and vibes. This was the last album recorded before Joe’s move to the popular Tico label where he recorded the majority of his hits. “Pregon Cha Cha” comes out of his first Mardi-Gras album entitled I Tried to Dance All Night when the cha-cha-cha was the dance craze of that time. Joe remembered performing this number at the famous Palladium Ballroom in New York while Hollywood luminaries Marlon Brando, Elizabeth Taylor, and others danced the night away. Once again, we are captivated by the soothing voice of Cheo Feliciano, the composer of the beautiful bolero “Como Rien,” from 1962’s Steppin’ Out, Joe’s first recording for Seeco. Nicky Jiménez was the unsung hero of the Joe Cuba Sextet. His colorful tinkling on the keyboards can be fully appreciated during the intro of this recording, setting the stage for Cheo’s wonderful rendition. Jimmy Sabater wrote “Jimmie’s Jump” for the Mardi-Gras album Red, Hot and Cha Cha Cha. The tune is performed by Cheo and, of course, includes one of Joe’s fabulous rhythm breaks in this wa-pa-cha-style mambo. This recording helped put Joe Cuba on the map and catapulted his career to greater heights. Penned by Nicky Jiménez, “Bochinchosa” is a fabulous guaguancó played in a typical mambo fashion. Taken from 1966’s We Must Be Doing Something Right, the song features Cheo on vocals and an interesting musical arrangement by pianist Nicky. The sexy “Mujer Divina,” written by Joe’s multitalented music associate Hector Rivera, is a slow bolero-cha that can be danced as a slow cha-cha or a cheek-to-cheek bolero. The chorus once again carries the tune with sweet step-outs by Willie Torres. Once again, the velvety voice of Jimmy Sabater is featured in the romantic bolero/ballad, “This Is Love,” written by Diana Bonilla, wife of empresario Richie Bonilla. As usual, Willie Torres and Ray Pollard provide the backup vocals with their inimitable harmonic style. The album concludes with Willie Torres singing in English on the movin’ and shakin’ mambo entitled “Mambo of the Times,” composed by Nicky Jiménez. This selection became a favorite when the group toured the cuchifrito circuit in the Catskill Mountain resorts in upstate New York. Fue en la noche del domingo 15 de febrero del 2009 cuando me informaron sobre la muerte de Joe “Sonny” Cuba. Irónicamente, en esos días había estado trabajando estas mismas notas, y conversaba con él regularmente para obtener sus comentarios en preparación para este álbum. Desafortunadamente, Joe padecía de una serie de enfermedades, y no tuvo la oportunidad de apreciar este tributo a su obra. Joe Cuba, cuyo verdadero nombre es Gilberto Navarro, nació el 22 de abril de 1931 en Spanish Harlem, Nueva York, ciudad a donde se habían trasladado sus padres puertorriqueños a finales de los años 20. Debido a los tiempos difíciles de la Gran Depresión, su madre, Gloria, se vio forzada a dejar a Gilberto y a Jack, su hermano mayor, en un hogar de acogida luego de que su padre abandonase a la familia. Al año siguiente los niños fueron acogidos por una familia italiana de Staten Island, los Liotta, y allí se acostumbraron a vivir la vida suburbana. Cuando Gilberto tenía cinco años, su madre, quien lo visitaba frecuentemente, volvió a casarse y reclamó a sus hijos, lo cual causó gran consternación para los Liotta y para los niños, quienes ya estaban aclimatados a ese estilo de vida. La Sra. Liotta le puso a Gilberto el apodo “Sonny”—ella lo adoraba y pensaba que era excepcionalmente inteligente—pero él adoptaría el apellido de su nuevo padrastro, Miguel Calderón. Durante los próximos años Gilberto y Jack tuvieron que adaptarse a la vida en Spanish Harlem. Afortunadamente, su padrastro era un buen hombre, dueño de una tienda de dulces en la calle 115 de El Barrio, y Gilberto pudo ayudarlo. Cautivado por el sonido de las congas de Sabu Martínez, Gilberto tuvo la oportunidad de aprender a tocarlas mientras se recuperaba de una ruptura en una pierna, sufrida durante un juego callejero de pelota. Gilberto tocaba en la calle hasta que le llegó la oportunidad de reemplazar a Sabu durante unos meses en la banda local La Alfarona X en 1950. Poco después se unió al quinteto de Joe Panamá, de Spanish Harlem, en donde Jimmy Sabater era el timbalero. Luego de reclutar al vibrafonista Tommy Berrios, Gilberto y la banda tuvieron un enfrentamiento con Panamá, y formaron la banda Cha Cha Boys con Gilberto Calderón como el líder del grupo. Lo tomó por sorpresa cuando su promotor, Catalino Rolón, lo anunció como “Joe Cuba”, y el nombre pegó. Una vez plenamente establecido, el Sexteto de Joe Cuba incluyó a Tommy Berrios en el vibráfono, Nick Jiménez en el piano y como arreglista, Jules “Slim” Cordero en el bajo, y al timbalero Jimmy Sabater, quien compartía vocalizaciones con el novato Willie Torres. En 1965 Torres se iría del grupo para unirse a la orquesta de José Curbelo, reemplazando a Santos Colón, quien se había ido con Tito Puente. José “Cheo” Feliciano asumió el papel de Willie en el Sexteto de Joe Cuba hasta el 1966, cuando se fue del grupo y fue reemplazado nada menos que por Willie Torres. El material recopilado en esta colección de dos discos es verdaderamente excepcional. Incluye grabaciones de las disqueras Seeco, Mardi-Gras, Tico y Fania, proveyéndole a usted una colección precisa de las grabaciones de Joe Cuba nunca antes compilada en formato de álbum. Joe siempre pensó que su música debía ser apreciada igualmente por el mercado anglo y por sus incontables y devotos seguidores latinos, y frecuentemente utilizaba letras en inglés para atraer a su fanaticada de americanos y jóvenes latinos. Sin lugar a dudas logró lo que se propuso con éxitos internacionales como “Bang Bang” y “El Pito (I’ll Never Go Back to Georgia)”. Como arquitecto del sonido estilo Joe Cuba, Joe tenía la facilidad de crear pura emoción en todas sus 240 grabaciones titulares. Pocos artistas pueden afirmar que han tocado en Carnegie Hall, el Teatro Apollo, el Palladium de Hollywood, el Madison Square Garden, y el pabellón del Caribe de la Feria Mundial de 1964, pero Joe sí fue capaz. Escuche “Boom Boom Lucumi” y sea testigo de la electricidad transmitida a su fanaticada en todas sus presentaciones. Joe tuvo la habilidad innata de hacer brillar a todos los que se presentaban con él; lograban máximos niveles de vigor cuando tocaban con el Sexteto de Joe Cuba. Y el mismo Joe siempre estaba pensando un poco más allá. Recuerdo una ocasión en la cual, luego de re-mezclar una melodía con Joe, él sacó de una bolsa unos altavoces de tres pulgadas de altura y le pidió al ingeniero Jon Fausty que tocara la mezcla final con estos altavoces de miniatura. Jon y yo nos miramos asombrados. “Mis fanáticos escuchan mi música a través de radios portátiles en Orchard Beach”, explicó Joe. “Si la mezcla final suena bien en estos altavoces, sonará aún mejor en la playa”. Jon y yo aprendimos una valiosa lección ese día. La primera vez que vi a Joe Cuba fue en la Feria Mundial de 1964 en Queens, Nueva York. Me cautivó su presentación y me convertí instantáneamente en uno de sus fanáticos. Dos años después me hallaba asistiendo entusiasmadamente a un ensayo para su próximo álbum, “My Man Speedy!”, en su hogar en Baldwin, Long Island, acompañado por mi socio, el escritor, vibrafonista, percusionista, arreglista, y compositor Louie Ramírez, quien me había informado que Joe estaba en busca de material nuevo para un álbum. A la semana siguiente, estuve en la presencia de Jimmy Sabater, Willie Torres, Nicky Jiménez, y Slim Cordero, y éste fue uno de los momentos más memorables de mi vida. Durante sus últimos días Joe trabajó un manuscrito narrando varios incidentes especiales que vivió en su fascinante viaje por la vida. Pensaba sin pretensiones que una película mostrando su vida en El Barrio y sus aventuras durante su ilustre carrera serían de particular interés para el público. Espero que esto se convierta en una realidad algún día. El Sexteto de Joe Cuba vivió la vida a plenitud. Bromeaban, reían, y se burlaban unos de los otros constantemente. Recuerdo una noche cuando Sonny y Jimmy asistieron conmigo a un coctel que yo había planeado para el vocalista brasileño Nelson Ned, quien a pesar de su diminuto tamaño poseía al cantar una voz descomunal. Mientras Nelson se ponía de pie para proponer un brindis para sus admiradores, Sonny me susurró al oído, “Yo pensaba que el tipo tendría suficiente clase como para ponerse de pie mientras se dirige a sus invitados”. Así era Joe Cuba, su sentido del humor y su pasión por la vida tan implacables como contagiosos—todos querían estar con él, cerca de él, y de ser parte de lo que fuera que estuviera haciendo. Llevó una vida extraordinaria y dejó un legado de música maravillosa para nuestro disfrute, como usted descubrirá al escuchar este álbum. Su presencia se extrañará eternamente, pero su espíritu permanece con aquellos que tuvimos la suerte de conocerlo. El álbum abre con “Do You Feel It”, una canción en donde la narración excepcional de Joe nos cuenta sobre sus peripecias, y de su amor eterno por el lugar en donde era conocido como el “alcalde”, su querido barrio de Spanish Harlem, en la ciudad de Nueva York. En este corte provocativo de “Bustin’ Out” (1972) se destaca la voz magnífica de Ray Pollard, quien nos ofrece un recuento algo pesimista de sus días como un hombre negro tratando de abandonar El Barrio en busca de una vida mejor. Yo me tomé la libertad, con el permiso de Joe, de “urbanizar” este corte con sobre doblaje y edición, dándole un enfoque un poco más contemporáneo. Cuando Willie Torres sustituyó al ilustre Cheo Feliciano como vocalista, la banda no perdió el ritmo, como es evidente en la voz de Willie en “Hey Joe, Hey Joe”. Con la adición de Torres, un cantautor subestimado, la banda llegó a convertirse en uno de los actos más solicitados, y Willie representaba gran parte del sonido crossover que identifica a Joe Cuba. “Bang Bang” fue estrenada en 1964 durante una presentación del Sexteto de Joe Cuba en el Garden’s Club de Nueva York (años antes de que se convirtiera en el célebre club nocturno Cheetah). Durante un intermedio, el timbalero/vocalista de Joe, Jimmy Sabater, notó una falta de interés por parte del público, mayormente compuesto de africano-americanos. Jimmy se acercó a Joe y al pianista Nicky Jiménez con la idea de inventar un tipo de sonido que llevara a los espectadores a la pista de baile. Lo que lograron es el acompañamiento que se escucha al principio de la canción. Jimmy le apostó una cerveza a Sonny que funcionaría, y comenzaron el set con él. De ahí en adelante se lo fueron inventando, mientras observaban cómo se llenaba la pista y a los bailarines gritando, “She freaks, ah! She freaks, ah!” durante los intermedios musicales. La multitud estaba como loca, y no permitían que la banda pusiera fin a su diversión, así es que siguieron extendiendo la canción para el deleite de la muchedumbre. Esa noche se creó un fenómeno. Al día siguiente Joe le pidió un ensayo a la banda con la idea de crear una mezcla apropiada para “Bang Bang”, a la cual le agregó entonces “Bi bi, ah! Bi bi, ah!”. Al día siguientetenía que convencer a Morris Levy, dueño de la disquera Tico, que le permitiera grabar la canción e incluirla en el próximo álbum, “Wanted Dead or Alive”, comúnmente conocido como “Bang! Bang! Push, Push, Push”. Levy no era el ejecutivo disquero más fácil de influir, pero de alguna manera Joe Cuba siempre conseguía lo que quería de Morris. La canción fue presentada en el álbum, creando un súper éxito nacional y provocando que otros directores de bandas como Pete Rodríguez, Richie Ray, Johnny Colón, y Joe Bataan se unieran al movimiento y le ofrecieran a los jóvenes compradores de discos de la época un tipo de música que adorarían, y que llamarían el bugalú latino. Para darle un sonido más callejero, Sonny decidió incluir en el coro a Héctor Rivera, Jr. y a Nicky Jiménez, Jr., ambos de ocho años de edad, a pesar de las protestas del productor Pancho Cristal. Además utilizó un micrófono elevado para lograr un sonido más tipo “en vivo”. Joe Cuba era un gran visionario, y sabía cómo utilizar varios trucos y ritmos interesantes para mejorar sus grabaciones. La experiencia de los cantantes de fondo de Joe Cuba se aprecia maravillosamente en el bolero “It’s Love”, el cual incluye las armonías de Jimmy Sabater, Willie Torres, y Ray Pollard. La canción muestra la habilidad dinámica del trío para cantar acompañamientos de fondo estilo doo-wop, al igual que al estilo antiguo de grupos como “The Lettermen” y “The Four Aces”. Muy pocas bandas pueden excitar a los mejores bailarines con sus interpretaciones de mambo y salsa, así como tocar boleros románticos de primera con tanta destreza. Joe Cuba lanzó una canción en 1966 que se convertiría en uno de los éxitos más grandes de su época, “El Pito (I’ll Never Go Back to Georgia)”, escrita por él y por Jimmy Sabater. Con el renombrado Cheo Feliciano como intérprete, la canción contiene un interludio adictivo que incluye silbidos melódicos. Joe, siempre al tanto de trucos que lo ayudaran a promover sus éxitos, mandó a fabricar miles de silbatos “El Pito” para repartirle a sus fanáticos. Nina Calderón, la esposa de Joe, recuerda cómo en 1967 desempacaron desaforadamente unos cinco mil silbatos para repartir durante una presentación de “El Pito” en el Madison Square Garden de Nueva York, mientras estaban de gira con el show de James Brown. Durante la presentación arrojaron miles de silbatos desde el escenario, causando una leve revuelta cuando la gente comenzó a correr por los pasillos, tratando de alcanzar un silbato “El Pito” de Joe Cuba. Más tarde, luego de que se arruinara su set gracias a los silbidos sin cesar durante su actuación, alguien escuchó a James Brown cuando dijo, “¡Ese hijo de puta no volverá a trabajar conmigo jamás!” Cuando se grabó “My Man Speedy!”, la banda estaba en su apogeo. Louie Ramírez había reemplazado al recientemente fallecido vibrafonista Tommy Berrios. La influencia de Louie es aparente al principio de la canción, con su imitación del popular líder de orquesta Kako, mientras el cantante principal, Willie Torres, imita brillantemente al personaje animado Speedy González. “Psychedelic Baby” es una canción que yo compuse con el título “Hey Hey Girl”. Pero Sonny quería unirse al movimiento hippy/psicodélico de la era, de modo que le cambió el título a la canción. Le pareció buena idea que yo hiciera un dúo con Willie Torres, lo cual pareció funcionar a pesar de la falta de talento vocal de este escritor. Pero la ayuda de Willie fue fundamental, brindándome la confianza que yo necesitaba para participar en esta grabación, y otras en el futuro. En “A Thousand Ways”, Joe demuestra su afición por la música doo-wop en esta interpretación de la balada de Nicky Jiménez. Escuche cuán bien las voces de fondo cantan al unísono y luego armonizan en el puente de la canción. Además escuchará una narración de Joe Cuba un par de veces en esta selección. La voz pulida de Ray Pollard se presenta como principal en “Ain’t It Funny What Love Can Do”. Seleccionada por razones obvias para hacer el cruce al mercado pop, esta melodía muestra la versatilidad de la banda, cubriendo varios géneros del espectro musical. Ray creció como un cantante excepcional de doo-wop, y formó parte de algunos de los mejores grupos de los ’50. “Swinging Mambo” proviene de una grabación de 1956 llamada “I Tried to Dance All Night”, de la disquera Mardi-Gras. Al comienzo de su carrera Joe Cuba incluía el uso de trompetas en su banda, lo cual es evidente en este corte. Las melódicas interpretaciones vocales y los interludios distintivos también son notables a través de la pieza. Willie Torres y el coro con letras en inglés contribuyeron a la infiltración de Joe Cuba en los mercados judíos e italianos de Nueva York, y más adelante a través del país. Una de las grabaciones más solicitadas de Joe Cuba es “Wabble-Cha”, un número muy bailable, con un precioso solo vibrafónico de Tommy Berrios y la voz de Cheo Feliciano. Los ubicuos e ingeniosos estribillos del coro contribuyen al agradable colorido de esta grabación. Joe Cuba no obstante, Jimmy Sabater es el alma de la banda. Su inteligencia y creatividad siempre han sido una parte vital del sonido Joe Cuba, y su habilidad como percusionista ha sido indispensable para la sección rítmica. Además, Jimmy es un espléndido vocalista y compositor, con la habilidad de cantar salsa como sonero, y además como exitoso cantante estilo crooner por sí solo. Influenciado por su admiración por el fallecido Nat King Cole, Jimmy aprendió de joven cómo incluir su estilo personal en sus grabaciones. Jimmy ha grabado discos bajo su propio nombre y condujo su propio grupo luego de separarse de Joe Cuba. En “I’m Insane”, una composición de Louie Ramírez, la voz aterciopelada de Jimmy brilla, mientras la voz tenor de Ray Pollard y las vibrafonías de Louie proporcionan acompañamiento experto. Siempre favorita del bailarín de la música latina y una grabación utilizada por muchos instructores de mambo alrededor del mundo, “Ariñañara” es realmente una pieza para fiestas. La sección rítmica se hace cargo de este número junto con la interpretación vocal de Cheo. Fíjese en la prominencia de las claves a través de toda la canción. Willie García brinda la emocionante interpretación vocal del tema “Hecho y Derecho” de “La Calle Esta Durísima", que a menudo se confunde con "A Las Seis", grabado anteriormente con Cheo en la parte vocal. Grabado años después, en 1973 con Phil Díaz en el vibráfono, el ritmo es más rápido y más bailable. El ritmo es firme como de costumbre y los intermedios musicales son tan ingeniosos como siempre. “Macorina” tiene definitivamente un aire de pachanga, la cual era lo último en la moda cuando se grabó cerca del año 1960. Sin parecerse en nada al sonido convencional de las flautas y los violines, la grabación todavía le pide a uno que se ponga de pie y baile la pachanga, saltando por toda la pista mientras agita un pañuelo. Tommy Berrios hábilmente utiliza el vibráfono como instrumento de percusión, ayudando a impulsar la melodía. Cheo y los interludios rítmicos son la guinda del pastel en este corte contundente. En 1967, Joe quería rendirle tributo a su vocalista Jimmy Sabater, y produjo “Joe Cuba Presents the Velvet Voice of Jimmy Sabater”. De este álbum proviene el bolero clásico “Los Dos”, interpretado de manera experta por Jimmy. Completamos el primer disco con una de las favoritas de Joe, “Y Joe Cuba Ya Llegó”, con la voz de Mike Guagenti. Esta canción de 1979 fue tomada de la última grabación de Joe para la disquera Tico, “El Pirata del Caribe”. En este corte, Joe demuestra sus habilidades como conguero durante un tremendo acompañamiento mientras el coro canta “Hey Joe” sin cesar. Artistas de las disqueras Tico y Alegre se presentaron en 1974 en un concierto en el mundialmente renombrado Carnegie Hall de la ciudad de Nueva York. Entre los artistas principales de la presentación estaba el Sexteto de Joe Cuba. Luego de una introducción por Symphony Sid, Joe tomó el micrófono y electrificó al público antes de su interpretación de “Lucumi”. Una vez más el Sexteto de Joe Cuba demostró ser el grupo más popular de la noche. Otra popular grabación de Joe Cuba con la voz de Cheo Feliciano es “A las Seis”. Con el coro de fondo cantando acerca de su querido Puerto Rico, Cheo le recuerda a su chica que debe estar lista “a las seis” para salir a pachanguear. Fíjese en la manera particular en que el vibráfono y el piano impulsan la sección rítmica durante el montuno de la canción. Además, escuche a Cheo mientras crea sus propias líneas de vientos durante el mambo. Cheo Feliciano, ¿cantando en inglés? Pues sí. En esta grabación estilo pop de “Remember Me” Joe decidió utilizar a Cheo como vocalista principal en vez de a sus vocalistas usuales en inglés, Jimmy Sabater o Willie Torres. Aunque la canción comienza con un aire de calipso, las voces de fondo proveen un sonido doo-wop que acompaña a Cheo maravillosamente en esta pista del álbum de 1964, “Diggin’ the Most”, de la disquera Seeco. Eventualmente Cheo se separó del grupo para iniciar una carrera como solista y se convirtió en uno de los principales vocalistas románticos de la música latina, reminiscente del gran Tito Rodríguez. En “Aunque Tú”, también tomada de “Diggin’ the Most”, Cheo demuestra la manera especial en que maneja un bolero romántico. La adaptación temprana de Mardi-Gras de “Temptation”, una composición clásica de Brown y Freed, nos muestra el coro cantando al unísono con un step-out por Willie Torres y un solo vibrafónico por Berrios. “La Malanga Brava”, otra grabación popular de Joe Cuba, cuenta con una fuerte sección de ritmo, con interludios siempre presentes y electrificantes. Willie y Cheo cantan en esta pista de “Wanted Dead or Alive”, de 1966. De sus grabaciones iniciales, otra favorita de Joe Cuba es “Joe Cuba Mambo”, con Jimmy Sabater en los timbales. En esta grabación de 1956, bajo el sello Mardi-Gras, escuchará los vientos, los cuales formaban parte del conjunto antes que éste fuera reducido a un sexteto consistiendo de bajo, piano, conga, timbales, y vibráfono, en el que Willie cantanba y tocaba la percusión. De todas las grabaciones de Joe Cuba, una de ellas sobresale como un bolero genuinamente ultra-romántico. “To Be With You”, del álbum “Steppin’ Out” (1962), fue compuesta originalmente en 1956 por el pianista Nicky Jiménez y el vocalista Willie Torres. La sorprendente decisión de Sonny de elegir al inimitable Jimmy Sabater en vez de a Cheo produjo grandes recompensas para la banda. La canción llegó a convertirse en el tema de bodas de muchas parejas latinas jóvenes. Yo produje una versión disco de “To Be With You” para la disquera Salsa Records en 1969, y fue muy bien interpretada, una vez más, por Jimmy Sabater. El disco, todo un éxito en Nueva York, fue uno de los primeros sencillos de 45 rpm de 12 pulgadas jamás fabricados. “Hecho y Derecho”, del álbum de Joe en 1973 “Doin’ It Right”, presenta la voz de Willie García, quien era en ese momento el esposo de la fabulosa vocalista La Lupe. Es un vaivén de mambo que los bailarines establecieron como uno de sus favoritos. Del tercer álbum con Mardi-Gras de Joe, titulado “Red, Hot and Cha Cha Cha” (probablemente grabado y lanzado al mercado alrededor de 1961, aunque se cita a menudo como un estreno de 1965) sale el mambo caliente “Componte Cundunga”. Cheo es la voz principal mientras que Jimmy y Tommy interpretan solos en los timbales y el vibráfono. Este fue el último álbum grabado antes de que Joe se mudara al popular sello disquero Tico, en donde grabó la mayoría de sus éxitos. “Pregón Cha Cha” proviene de su primer álbum con Mardi-Gras, titulado “I Tried to Dance All Night”, cuando el cha-cha-cha era toda una locura del baile en esa época. Joe recordaba haber interpretado este número en el famoso salón de baile del Palladium en Nueva York, mientras estrellas como Marlon Brando, Elizabeth Taylor, y otras bailaban la noche entera. Una vez más nos cautiva la suave voz de Cheo Feliciano, el compositor del precioso bolero “Como Ríen”, de “Steppin’ Out” (1962), la primera grabación de Joe bajo Seeco. Nicky Jiménez fue el héroe anónimo del Sexteto de Joe Cuba. Su colorida manera de tintinear en el teclado se puede apreciar completamente durante la introducción de esta grabación, en preparación para la maravillosa interpretación de Cheo. Jimmy Sabater escribió “Jimmie’s Jump” para el álbum “Red, Hot and Cha Cha Cha” con Mardi-Gras. La canción es interpretada por Cheo, y por supuesto, incluye los fabulosos interludios rítmicos de Joe en este mambo al estilo “wa-pa-cha”. Esta grabación ayudó a poner a Joe Cuba en el mapa, y elevó su carrera a grandes alturas. Escrito por Nicky Jiménez, “Bochinchosa” es un guaguancó interpretado en la típica forma de mambo. Tomada de “We Must Be Doing Something Right” (1966), la canción cuenta con la voz de Cheo y un interesante arreglo musical por Nicky, el pianista. La sexy “Mujer Divina”, escrita por el multi-talentoso socio musical de Joe, Héctor Rivera, es un lento bolero-cha que puede ser bailado despacito como un cha-cha o como un bolero de cara-a-cara. El coro está a cargo de la melodía una vez más, con dulces step-outs por Willie Torres. Una vez más, la voz aterciopelada de Jimmy Sabater aparece en el bolero romántico “This Is Love”, escrita por Diana Bonilla, esposa del empresario Richie Bonilla. Como de costumbre, Willie Torres y Ray Pollard proporcionan los coros con su armónico e inimitable estilo. El álbum concluye con Willie Torres cantando en inglés en el súper movido mambo titulado “Mambo of the Times”, compuesto por Nicky Jiménez. Esta selección se convirtió en una de las favoritas del grupo cuando se fueron de gira por la sección “cuchifrito” de las montañas Catskill, en el norte del estado de Nueva York.