s

Hector Lavoe

Hector Lavoe - La Voz

$0.99

Hector Lavoe

Hector Lavoe - La Voz

$18.98 Album
$18.99 Album
$18.99 Album
$18.99 Album
Aguanile
La Banda
Ah-Ah/O-No
Te Conozco
Abuelita
Que Bien Te Ves
Barrunto
Pirana
La Murga
Juana Pena
Che Che Cole
Triste Y Vacia
Timbalero
Mi Gente (1)
Todo Tiene Su Final
El Todopoderoso
Periodico De Ayer
Isla Del Encanto
El Cantante
El Sabio
Hacha Y Machete
Vamos A Reir Un Poco
El Rey De La Puntualidad
Ublabadu
Alejate
La Fama
Mi Gente (2)
Héctor Lavoe was just seven years old when he skipped trombone class at the Juan Morel Music Academy and flew off to the Portugués River, where he skinny-dipped with his friends from the modest Machuelitos neighborhood of his hometown. This was post-war Ponce, still years from modernization, and like many other cities in Puerto Rico, the capital city could make few promises for a better future. The economy was fundamentally agrarian, and aside from the few opportunities to work on sugar cane plantations, unemployment was the norm. As a result, many Ponce residents were forced to enlist in the United States Army. Born on September 30, 1946, Héctor Juan Pérez Martínez had never considered a military career. He lost his mother at a very young age, and it was his father –businessman and music aficionado Luis Pérez- who fostered Héctor’s talent for popular music. Pérez was a highly demanded guitarist for the Fiestas de Cruz celebrations and other popular religious ceremonies, and he wanted his son to receive formal music training as a trombonist. Héctor had a different idea – ever since he was a little boy he had dreamt of becoming a singer. And rightly so: he was known for spontaneously bursting into a Vicentico Valdés bolero or Ramito aguinaldo during his tireless pranks on the sugar cane mills and plantations in the Machuelo, Tenerías, Magueyes, and Sabanetas neighborhoods. In post-war Ponce, music was what genuinely captured the essence of life in the city and the countryside. Héctor was exposed to musical soirees in Ponce neighborhoods and the lyrics of the bolero numbers he harmonized with – songs like “Plazos traicioneros” by Luis Demetrio and “Tus ojos” by Pepe Delgado. He learned them all by heart by playing them over and over on café jukeboxes. Héctor Juan was a natural troubadour and an eloquent man, with hypnotic powers of persuasion that had girls eating out of the palm of his hand. Like his father Luis, he was a great admirer of feminine beauty. He enriched his musical background by delving into Mexican, Argentine, and Spanish cinema of the era: the films of Joselito, Sara García, Miguel Aceves Mejía, Carlos Gardel, Hugo del Carril, and Lola Flores. Right from the start, Héctor Juan was a shining star: his charisma, talent, and charm were exceptional, indisputable. Héctor was like nobody anybody had ever seen before. He was one of a kind. His sweet, sensuous voice demanded attention simply because it was so unique. Crystal-clear, refined, and unhurried, with impeccable diction and expressive phrasing: that was Héctor. Already well on his way to becoming a popular-music vocalist, in his adolescence he began frequenting clubs such as Segovia, where he sang accompanied by his childhood friends, Roberto García and José Febles. One afternoon when he was around 16 years old, he told his father he was moving to New York to live with his older sister, Priscilla. He was ready to try his hand on the music scene. After all, New York City was the Mecca of mambo: the market that catapulted Machito, Tito Puente, Tito Rodríguez, and countless others into fame. His father was vehemently opposed to the idea. They argued, verbally attacking each other, and then with his own brand of violence, Luis slapped Héctor hard across the face, telling his son that if he left, he could never come back to his family in Ponce again. Luis was afraid that Héctor Juan would suffer the same fate as his brother, Luis Angel, who had died of a drug overdose (Priscilla swears it was a car accident). But Héctor longed to sing. Emancipated from his father’s will, he marched straight to the Bronx on May 3, 1963, a skeletal 17-year-old knocking on the door at 1117 Bryant Avenue in the Bronx. He wore long sleeves and tight pants, and at 5’8” he barely tipped the scale at 102 pounds. Painter, porter, messenger, and concierge were just a few of the jobs he held trying to earn a living, until one day he reconnected with his friend Roberto García. The two of them began to frequent Latin music and dance clubs in the Bronx, Spanish Harlem, and Lower Manhattan. Héctor met Russell Cohen, who fronted the New Yorkers, the band Héctor would first record with in 1965: the album “Está de bala.” He worked with Francisco “Kako” Bastar until meeting his musical mentor, Johnny Pacheco, who immediately recognized his talent. Soon after, Johnny introduced Héctor to Willie Colón, and asked the pair to record the album “El malo” with Fania Records. Héctor accepted the proposition on one condition: that he continue on his own path. But the reality was that Fania Records released “El malo” in 1967, and Héctor and Willie were inseparable for the next seven years. The album hit like a tsunami, with waves of success crashing through France, Panama, Colombia, and various other countries. The album reached multi-million-dollar sales, and with the sudden fame came love and lust; experimentation with marijuana, heroin, and cocaine; initiation into sanctimoniousness; intrigue; betrayals and hypocrisy; drug overdoses; family tragedies; suicide attempts; and exploitation. Finally, on June 29, 1993, far from his homeland and ravaged by AIDS, Héctor Juan Pérez Martínez succumbed to death. His Musical Legacy By Jaime Torres Torres Willie Colón himself has admitted in several interviews that thanks to Héctor Lavoe (so named by Arturo Franklyn), he learned to better understand the Spanish language and to appreciate the rich heritage of Puerto Rican music. The imprint left by this popular duo will never fade away, and the announcement of their separation in 1973 shook the industry to its core. However, not all was lost: many were consoled by the fact that Willie continued to work at Héctor’s side as a producer and occasional band member. Their music –particularly the dissonant phrases of Willie’s trombone, their daring multi-rhythmic arrangements, and Lavoe’s stabbing, irreverent interpretations– captured the streets of suburbia: from the littered streets of the Bronx to the dreams of a better future for Puerto Rican compadres and all Caribbean brothers from the post-war diaspora. The Lavoe/Colón duo, against the aggressive, violent, and revolutionary backdrop of the hippie movement and anti-Vietnam demonstrations, gave their Latin fans albums such as “El malo,” “The Hustle,” “Guisando,” “Cosa nuestra,” “La gran fuga,” “Asalto navideño,” “El juicio,” “Lo mato,” “Asalto navideño Vol. II,” and “Vigilante.” In 1967, the boogaloo, shingaling, and jala-jala were still at their height. The Lavoe/Colón duo adapted easily to industry demands, churning out hits like “Willie Baby,” “Willie Whopper,” and “Skinny Papa,” a duet with Willie. But they really hit pay dirt with the son number “El malo,” the guaguancó hit “Borinquen,” and the boogaloo/son montuno number “Chonquí,” tracks that guaranteed a long and successful career for the pair. The duo truly exploded in 1969 with the release of “Cosa nuestra.” The album’s first single was the Afro-Caribbean hybrid number “Che che colé,” which intertwined beats such as the bomba and the oriza, demonstrating Willie’s ingenuity and talent for salsa in the shadow of the overpowering mambo, son matancero, and Cuban rhumba of the day. The experimentation and innovation continued with “La gran fuga,” “Asalto navideño,” and “Lo mato,” albums that placed them firmly among the likes of established stars such as Tito Puente, Joe Cuba, and Eddie Palmieri. By the time the pair broke up, Héctor Lavoe was already a legend. With or without Willie Colón, he was a superstar. And with the release of "La voz," which included the fabulous “El todopoderoso” with an arrangement reminiscent of Gregorian chants, he only became more successful. With “De ti depende” (only his second album as a soloist, but considered today the best of his discography), Lavoe solidified his position as the most popular artist of salsa, thanks to the mega-hits “Periódico de ayer,” “Vamos a reír un poco,” and “Hacha y machete.” After recovering from his first drug overdose, Lavoe returned with a vengeance in 1978, releasing “Comedia.” The album featured the smash hit “El cantante,” which Rubén Blades composed, tailoring it to fit Héctor like a glove. From that moment on, Héctor Lavoe was known as “El Cantante de Los Cantantes” (“The Singer of All Singers,”) and the favorite among the Fania All Stars. Héctor Lavoe hit highs and lows over the course of his career. The lows were the result of character flaws, drug addiction, insecurities, and a schizophrenia he tried to subdue by devoting himself to religion. Whether high or low, “El Cantante” drove relentlessly on, occasionally striking gold with albums like “Reventó” and “Strikes Back,” considered among the best of his discography. The Myth of Héctor Lavoe By Jaime Torres Torres There is no doubt whatsoever that on the 60th anniversary of his birth, and 13 years after his death, Héctor Lavoe is still singing to the Latino nation from another dimension - just as he promised he would in the aguinaldo number “Canto a Borinquen.” The legend is now a myth: a phenomenon comparable only to the likes of Carlos Gardel, Edith Piaf, Pedro Infante, and John Lennon. No salsa artist has ever had such an impact on the world as Héctor did. And the myth grows day by day, because his music was a spiritual expression of his innermost feelings: a sincere reflection of his life, his delights, and his heartaches. Such was the life of Héctor Juan Pérez Martínez, an empathetic and sympathetic character, a neighborhood guy: down-to-earth and humble, not unlike the reader of these lines. Make no mistake: Héctor Lavoe was the most accomplished and multifaceted artist of Afro-Caribbean music. He sang everything, and he sang it well: boleros, boogaloos, guajiras, and sons; ballads, tangos, aguinaldos, seises, plenas, bombas, rancheras, and merengues. That's why the collection “Héctor Lavoe: A Man & His Music” is such a gem. It represents a little bit of everything from his discography alongside Willie Colón, with the Fania All Stars, and as a solo artist, emphasizing the albums “Cosa nuestra,” “El juicio,” “De ti depende,” and “El sabio.” The human element of the suffering artist is clear in “El cantante,” “La fama,” and “Loco.” His spiritual endeavors are revealed in "El todopoderoso," "Aguanile," and "Para Ochún." His spite is bitterly present in "Periódico de ayer," "Aléjate," "Juana Peña," and "Piraña." His festive, cheery spirit rings out in “Che che colé,” “La murga,” “Mi gente,” and “Vamos a reír un poco.” His pride and national identity bursts forth in “Isla del encanto.” And his fatalistic view of life is inescapable in “No me llores” and “Todo tiene su final.” Héctor Lavoe is the voice of the street, the spokesperson for hope. His art is a reflection of life. At least, that’s how Willie Colón always saw him. On June 29, 1993, the morning of Héctor’s death, Willie gave a statement from Spain, eloquently describing his friend and compadre as "The hero of the common man, and a martyr of salsa,” the colossal genre he helped to create. Discography El malo (1967) The Hustle (1968) Guisando (1969) Cosa nuestra (1969) La gran fuga (1970) Asalto navideño (1971) El juicio (1972) Lo mato (1973) Asalto navideño Vol. II (1973) La voz (1975) The Good, the Bad & the Ugly (1975) De ti depende (1976) Comedia (1978) Recordando a Felipe Pirela (1979) Feliz Navidad (1979) El sabio (1980) Que sentimiento (1981) Vigilante (1983) Reventó (1985) Strikes Back (1987) The Master & the Protégé (1993) Live (1997) Era un chamaquito de siete años cuando se ausentaba de sus clases de trombón de vara en la Escuela Libre de Música Juan Morel Campos para escaparse al Río Portugués donde se bañaba desnudo con sus amigos de la humilde barriada Machuelitos de su Ponce natal. En plena posguerra y lejos aún de una trancisión hacia la modernización, la Ciudad Señorial –como otros pueblos del país- no ofrecía muchas garantías de progreso para sus niños y jóvenes. La economía era fundamentalmente agraria y, aparte de escasas oportunidades de trabajo en el cultivo de la caña de azúcar, el desempleo obligó a muchos ponceños a enlistarse en el ejército de Estados Unidos. Héctor Juan Pérez Martínez, nacido el 30 de septiembre de 1946, nunca consideró la idea de una carrera militar. Huérfano de madre a temprana edad, fue su padre, el comerciante y músico aficionado Luis Pérez, la persona que despertó su sensibilidad hacia la música popular. Don Luis, guitarrista muy solicitado en las celebraciones de las fiestas de cruz, los rosarios, las promesas y otros ritos de la religiosidad popular, deseaba que su hijo recibiera educación formal en música y se convirtiera en un gran trombonista. Pero desde muy pequeño el hijo de Panchita Martínez y Luis Pérez soñó con ser cantante. Y no era para menos porque en sus incansables travesuras por los cañaverales e ingenios azucareros de los barrios Machuelo, Tenerías, Magueyes y Sabanetas siempre anduvo a flor de labios con un bolero de Vicentico Valdés o un aguinaldo de Ramito. En el Ponce de la posguerra las serenatas constituían una de las estampas más genuinas de la vida en el campo y la ciudad. Héctor estuvo expuesto a veladas musicales en los barrios ponceños y las letras de los boleros que entonaba, como “Plazos traicioneros” de Luis Demetrio o “Tus ojos” de Pepe Delgado, se las aprendió depositando centavos en las velloneras de los cafetines. Héctor Juan era un trovador innato y un tipo muy elocuente, con una labia y un poder de persuasión hipnotizador que rendía a las chicas a sus pies. Era, como su padre Luis, un enamorado de la belleza femenina. Su exposición al cine mexicano, argentino y español de la época; a las películas de Joselito, Sara García, Miguel Aceves Mejía, Carlos Gardel, Hugo del Carril y Lola Flores, enriquecieron su bagaje musical. Desde el principio la estrella de Héctor Juan brilló con luz propia; su carisma, talento, ángel y tabla eran excepcionales e indiscutibles. Héctor no se parecía a nadie. Su estilo era ‘sui generis’, único en su clase. Era una voz dulce, de un registro agudo acariciante, que se debía escuchar porque no admitía comparación. Cristalina, afinada, pausada, con una dicción impecable y un fraseo expresivo, así cantaba Héctor. Destinado a una carrera como cantante de música popular, en su adolescencia empezó a frecuentar clubes como el Segovia, donde cantó acompañado de sus amigos de infancia Roberto García y José Febles. Una tarde, rondando los 16 años, le dijo a don Luis que se marchaba a Nueva York a vivir con su hermana mayor Priscilla para probar suerte en la música pues la ciudad era la meca del mambo y el mercado que catapultó a Machito, Tito Puente, Tito Rodríguez y otras legendarias figuras. Su padre se opuso tenazmente. Discutieron, se ofendieron con palabras fuertes y, con su peculiar violencia y ligereza, don Luis le pegó fuertemente en la cara, increpándole que si se marchaba se olvidara de que tenía familia en Ponce. Don Luis nunca se lo supo explicar: temía que Héctor Juan corriera la misma suerte de su hermano Luis Angel, quien murió de una sobredosis de drogas, aunque Priscilla nos reiteró que falleció en un accidente de tránsito. Como anhelaba cantar, Héctor se marchó a la Babel de Hierro el 3 de mayo de 1963, emancipado en contra de la voluntad de don Luis. Al apartamento 1117 de la Avenida Bryan en el Bronx arribó un esquelético jovencito de 17 años, vestido con camisa de manga larga y pantalones ‘brinca charcos’, de 5 pies y 8 pulgadas de estatura y sólo 102 libras de peso. Pintor, maletero, mensajero y conserje fueron algunos de los oficios con los que intentó ganarse la vida hasta el día en que se reencontró con su amigo Roberto García y comenzó a frecuentar los clubes de música latina y los salones de baile del Bronx, del Barrio Latino y el bajo Manhattan. Se conectó con Rusell Cohen, director de la New Yorker, la banda con la cual en 1965 realizó su primera grabación: el sencillo de 45 rpm “Está de bala”. Trabajó con Francisco Bastar ‘Kako’ hasta que conoció a su padrino artístico Johnny Pacheco, quien inmediatamente identificó su talento y poco después se lo presentó a Willie Colón para que grabaran el disco “El malo” para Fania Records. Héctor aceptó con la condición de continuar su derrotero, pero lo cierto es que a partir de 1967, en que Fania editó “El malo”, Héctor Juan estuvo alrededor de siete años asociado directamente a Colón. El éxito sobrevino con la fuerza de un tsunami. Y con el éxito, los aplausos de París, Panamá, Colombia y otros países. Las ventas de sus discos fueron multimillonarias y con la fama llegaron el amor y el interés, la experimentación con marihuana, heroína y cocaína, la iniciación en la santería, las intrigas, las traiciones e hipocresías, las sobredosis de drogas, las tragedias familiares, los intentos de suicidio y la explotación de la industria, hasta que el 29 de junio de 1993, lejos de su patria y flagelado por el Sida, la muerte se fue de farra con Héctor Juan Pérez Martínez. Su legado musical Por Jaime Torres Torres El propio Willie Colón ha admitido en varias entrevistas que gracias a Héctor Lavoe, nombrado así por el promotor Arturo Franklyn, aprendió a comprender mejor el lenguaje español y a valorar la riqueza cultural de la música puertorriqueña. Las huellas del popular binomio son imborrables y el anuncio de su separación en 1973 estremeció la industria. Tras la triste noticia, sin embargo, pocos años después muchos se consolaron al descubrir que Willie continuaba a su lado como productor y socio de algunos conciertos y presentaciones especiales. En su música; particularmente en las frases disonantes del trombón de Willie, en sus atrevidos arreglos polirrítmicos y en las punzantes e irreverentes interpretaciones callejeras de Lavoe, latía el grito de los suburbios, de los callejones acumulados de basura en el Bronx y los sueños de un mejor porvenir entrañados por los boricuas y demás hermanos caribeños de la diaspora de la posguerra. La dupleta Lavoe/Colón; respaldada por un sonido agresivo, violento y revolucionario como el estilo de vida hippie y los discursos en oposición al genocidio de Vietnam, le obsequió al pueblo latino álbumes como “El malo”, “The Hustle”, “Guisando”, “Cosa nuestra”, “La gran fuga”, “Asalto navideño”, “El juicio”, “Lo mato”, “Asalto navideño Vol. II” y “Vigilante”. En 1967 el boogaloo, el shing-aling y el jala jala aún estaban en su apogeo y la combinación Lavoe-Colón se adaptó fácilmente a las exigencias de la industria, respondiendo con cortes como “Willie Baby”, “Willie Whopper” y “Skinny Papa”, a dúo con Willie. Pero fueron la bomba con son “El malo”, el guaguancó “Borinquen” y el boogaloo con son montuno “Chonquí” los temas que anticiparon que el derrotero del binomio sería muy prometedor y productivo. La explosión se produjo en 1969 con el lanzamiento de “Cosa nuestra”, álbum cuya punta de lanza fue el híbrido afrocaribeño “Che che colé”, un arreglo que enlazó ritmos como la bomba y el oriza, demostrando Willie que podía crear con ingenio en la salsa al margen de la fuerte influencia del mambo, del son matancero y la rumba cubana de aquellos días. La experimentación e innovación continuó con “La gran fuga”, “Asalto navideño” y “Lo mato”, elepés que los colocó al mismo nivel de rentabilidad y cotización de nombres establecidos como Tito Puente, Joe Cuba y Eddie Palmieri. Cuando el binomio se desintegró la leyenda de Héctor Lavoe era un fenómeno. Había que contar con él, con o sin Willie Colón. Y desde el lanzamiento de “La voz”, con el sencillo “El Todopoderoso” y su arreglo con compases de la música de los monjes gregorianos, su paso fue ascendente. Con “De ti depende”, apenas su segundo disco como solista y considerado hoy por hoy el mejor de su discografía, Lavoe se consagró como el solista más aclamado de la salsa, gracias al éxito de “Periódico de ayer”, “Vamos a reír un poco” y “Hacha y machete”. Recuperado de su primera sobredosis, en 1978 regresó con “Comedia” y el megahit “El cantante” que Rubén Blades, como un buen sastre, compuso a su medida. A partir de ese momento Héctor Lavoe fue conocido como El Cantante de los Cantantes; es decir, el intérprete favorito de sus compañeros en las Estrellas de Fania. Entre altas y bajas, atribuidas más a su falta de carácter, a su adicción a las drogas, a sus complejos y un tipo de esquizofrenia que intentó paliar con su devoción a los santos, la carrera de El Cantante siguió su curso, brillando ocasionalmente con el lanzamiento de álbumes como “Reventó” y “Strikes Back”, considerados entre lo mejor de su discografía. El mito de Héctor Lavoe Por Jaime Torres Torres No hay duda de que en el sexagésimo aniversario de su natalicio y a trece años de su partida, Héctor Lavoe le sigue cantando al pueblo latino desde la otra vida, como lo prometió en el aguinaldo “Canto a Borinquen”. La leyenda ya es un mito. Un fenómeno popular comparable sólo con Carlos Gardel, Edith Piaf, Pedro Infante y John Lennon. Ningún salsero ha calado tan profundo en el corazón del mundo. Y el mito crece y se inmortaliza cada día más porque su música era una expresión espiritual, muy de adentro, demasiado sincera y reflejo de su vida; de sus deleites y sinsabores. Así se explica la trascendencia del artista ponceño Héctor Juan Pérez Martínez, un tipo empático y simpático, un camarada de barrio, sencillo y humilde, posiblemente como los lectores de estas líneas. El Cantante, sin temor a equivocarnos, es el intérprete más completo y polifacético de la música afroantillana. Cantó de todo y con excelencia: desde boleros, boogaloos, guajiras y sones, hasta baladas, tangos, aguinaldos, seises, plenas, bombas, rancheras y merengues. Así lo podrá apreciar en la colección “Héctor Lavoe: A Man & His Music”, la que se nutre de lo más representativo de su discografía con Willie Colón, con las Estrellas de Fania y como solista, con énfasis en los discos “Cosa nuestra”, “El juicio”, “De ti depende” y “El sabio”. El lado humano del artista que sufre se revela en “El cantante”, “La fama” y “Loco”. Su perfil espiritual se descubre en “El Todopoderoso”, “Aguanile” y “Para Ochún”. El sentimiento del tipo despechado late en “Periódico de ayer”, “Aléjate”, “Juana Peña” y “Piraña”. Su alma festiva y alegre se libera en “Che che colé”, “La murga”, “Mi gente” y “Vamos a reír un poco”. Su sentimiento e identidad nacional resuena en “Isla del Encanto”. Y su visión fatalista de la vida, entre otras temáticas de la narrativa salsera, vibra en “No me llores” y “Todo tiene su final”. Héctor Lavoe es el eco del sentimiento de la calle y es portavoz de la ilusión de los barrios populares. Sus pregones son una radiografía de la vida. Así siempre lo entendió Willie Colón, quien en la mañana de su muerte, el 29 de junio de 1993, desde España elocuentemente describió a su amigo y compañero como el “Héroe de la gente pobre y el mártir de la salsa”, monstruo que ayudó a crear. Discografía El malo (1967) The Hustle (1968) Guisando (1969) Cosa nuestra (1969) La gran fuga (1970) Asalto navideño (1971) El juicio (1972) Lo mato (1973) Asalto navideño Vol. II (1973) La voz (1975) The Good, The Bad & The Ugly (1975) De ti depende (1976) Comedia (1978) Recordando a Felipe Pirela (1979) Feliz Navidad (1979) El sabio (1980) Que sentimiento (1981) Vigilante (1983) Reventó (1985) Strikes Back (1987) The Master & The Protégé (1993) Live (1997)