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Ray Barretto

Hard Hands

$1.50

Ray Barretto

Hard Hands

$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
Hard Hands
Abidjan
Love Beads
Mi Ritmo Te Llama
Got To Have You
Son Con Cuero
Mirame De Frente
New York Soul
Ahora Si

By the time Ray Barretto had recorded this album, he had already established himself as a first call conguero in the world of jazz and as a bandleader on NYC’s vibrant Afro-Cuban dance music scene. His early roots, working with such luminaries as Tito Puente, José Curbelo and others were now a thing of the past. He had abandoned the charanga (flute and violins) format that yielded him a crossover novelty hit, El Watusi and now he had formed a conjunto (two trumpet based group) which was making a name for itself with his debut album ACID, for the newly formed Fania record company.

In keeping with the tenor of the times, Ray continued to compose tunes that fused Rhythm and Blues elements with Afro-Cuban rhythm. The genre became known as Latin Boogaloo and this album has great examples of the style. The opening tune, titled after Ray’s sobriquet, “Hard Hands” (given to him by a fan at a radio station who Ray tapped on the shoulder) features the English vocals of trumpeter René Lopez. Ray’s powerful conga drumming is showcased and the tune became a hit on NYC’s R & B radio giant WWRL AM in NYC. It thus further increased and solidified his visibility outside of the Latino community, particularly among African Americans.

“Abidjian”, composed by Ray in tribute to that beautiful Ivory Coast City in West Africa, opens with Bobby Valentin’s mighty tumbao (repetitive pattern) on the bass. It’s a feature for Cuban born timbalero Orestes Vilato, whose virtuosic technique would influence a whole generation of drummers. Of note is the tunes unique arrangement which features three rhythms. NYC style mozambique in the opening, mambo during Orestes solo, back to mozambique for trumpeter Roberto Rodriguez’s solo and finally as a closing tribute to Mother Africa, the tune switches to bembé rhythm. “Love Beads” is an instrumental boogaloo which closes with some nice jazz influenced trumpet work by René Lopez.

“Mi Ritmo Te Llama” begins as a funky mid-tempo son montuno addressing how Barretto’s rhythm invites one to party. No doubt a tribute to the influence the legendary Cuban tres player Arsenio Rodriguez had on Ray. The tune suddenly shift gears into an up-tempo guaracha featuring Luis Crúz on a tasty piano solo which segues into a short trumpet feature for Vilato’s fellow Cuban colleague, trumpeter Roberto Rodriguez. Puerto Rican born vocalist Adalberto Santiago has the last word with some great soneo’s (vocal improvs). Take note! Corista (background vocalist) Jimmy Sabater has the final word as he shouts Salsa! It possibly may be the first time the word was utilized on a NYC recording of Afro-Cuban based music. “Got to Have You” is in the boogaloo vein and it exemplifies Ray’s unique compositional technique. I have a knack for writing bass lines. Most of the things I write start with a tumbao (repetitive line). This tune grew out of that.

“Son Con Cuero” is another showcase for Vilato, but this time the tune opens with some beautiful trumpet work done by Roberto Rodriguez at a medium son montuno tempo. As the intensity of the eventual Vilato solo builds, the coro (background vocals) of Willie Torres and Jimmy Sabater rightfully exclaim, Vilato se boto! La puso en China! (Vilato has outdone himself! He’s knocked it out to China!). Hugo Gonzalez’s “Mirame De Frente” is a guaracha featuring Adalberto that deals with someone who doesn’t have the courage to face one face to face - in this case, a lover. “New York Soul” is another fine example of Latin Boogaloo with again, René Lopez featured on vocals which achieved airplay on NYC pop radio. The album closes with yet another funky son montuno penned by Ray entitled “Ahora Si”, an affirmation of things being right on in the positive. Ray gets the final word as his conga solo closes the disc in a beautiful example of controlled intensity. Fitting testimony to the beginning of the group that would become known as the most powerful conjunto of what would become known as, The Salsa Era.

PERSONNEL:

Ray Barretto – Congas, Musical Director
Adalberto Santiago – Lead Vocal on “Mi Ritmo Te Llama”, “Mirame De Frente”, “Ahora Si”; Guiro on “Abidjian”, Lead Vocal on “Abidjian” in bembé section
Roberto Rodriguez – Lead Trumpet
Joseph “Papy” Roman – Trumpet
René Lopez – Lead Vocal on “Hard Hands, “’Got To Have You”, “New York Soul”, Trumpet Solo on “Love Beads”
Orestes Vilato – Timbales, Drumset on “Love Beads” and “New York Soul”
Tony Fuentes – Bongó, Cencerro (bongo bell), Cha-Cha Bell on “Love Beads”, Clave on “Abidjian”
Louis Crúz – Piano
Bobby “Mr. Soul” Valentin – Ampeg “Baby” Bass
Willie Torres and Jimmy Sabater – Coro (Background Vocals)
Jimmy Sabater – Vocal Exclamations – (“Ray Que Pasa?, etc.) on “New York Soul”

Produced by Ray Barretto
Executive Producer - Jerry Masucci
All arrangements supervised by Ray Barretto except “Love Beads” and “Mirame De Frente” done by Louis Crúz
Recorded at Century Sound in NYC in 1968
Recording Engineer: Brooks Arthur
Original Cover and all other photos: Leon Gast
Original album cover design: Izzy Sanabria

Written by Bobby Sanabria By the time Ray Barreto recorded this album, already established as a known conga player in the world of jazz and as a bandleader in the vibrant Afro-Cuban dance music scene in New York. Its primary roots, he worked with such luminaries as Tito Puente, José Curbelo and others now, they were gone. He had abandoned the format charanga (flute and violins) that produced a novel crossover success, The Watusi and now had formed a group (group based on two trumpets), who was making a name with ACID debut album, to the newly formed Fania record label.

According to the tenor of the times, Ray continued writing songs that fused elements of Rhythm and Blues with Afro-Cuban rhythm. The genre became known as Latin Boogaloo and this album has great examples of the style. The opening theme, titled after the nickname he received Ray, "Hard Hands" (given by a fan of a radio station, which touched on the shoulder Ray) presents letters in English trumpeter René Lopez. The powerful blow of congas Ray is displayed and the subject becomes a success in the giant radial R & B New York WWRLAM. Thus it increased more and solidified its visibility outside the Latino community, particularly among African Americans.

"Abidjian" composed by Ray in honor of the beautiful city of Ivory Coast in West Africa, opens with the powerful Tumbao (repeating pattern) Bobby Valentin on bass. It's a feature for the Cuban drummer Orestes Vilató, whose virtuoso technique would influence . an entire generation of drummers Of note are the unique arrangements of the songs, which have three rhythms A Mozambique in NYC style in the opening;. mambo, during one of Orestes, back to Mozambique trumpet solo Roberto Rodriguez and finally as a farewell tribute to Mother Africa, the theme changes to bembé pace. "Love Beads" in an instrumental boogaloo, which closes with a beautiful work of influential jazz trumpet, performed by René Lopez.

"Mi Ritmo Te Llama" starts as a son montuno funky mid-tempo, making it clear how the pace of Barretto invites one to celebrate. No doubt a tribute to the influence he had on the legendary singer Ray three Cuban Arsenio Rodríguez. The subject suddenly changes its axis up to a tempo guaracha, Louis Cruz featuring a tasty piano solo that moves smoothly into a short presentation of the Cuban trumpet Vilató colleague, trumpeter Roberto Rodriguez and finally to Puerto Adalberto Santiago vocalist with some soneos (improvisations). Note! Jimmy Sabater in choirs has the final word, when shouts sauce! It's quite possibly the first time the word is used in a recording made in NYC music with Afro-Cuban base. "Got To Have You" is in the vein of the boogaloo and exemplifies the unique Ray compositional technique. I have a trick to writing bass lines. In most things I write, starting with Tumbao ( repetitive) line. This issue arose from that.

"Are With Leather" is another exhibition to Vitató, but this time it opens with some beautiful work of trumpet, made by Roberto Rodriguez in a medium tempo of son montuno. As intensity increases only Vilató, choir Willie Torres and Jimmy Sabater just exclaim, Vilató was launched. He put her in China! . "Look De Frente" Hugo González is a guaracha featuring Adalberto dealing with someone who does not have the courage to face one face to face - in this case a lover. "New York Soul" is another fine example of the Latin boogaloo with, again, René Lopez voices managed to stand on pop radio in NYC. The album closes with another son montuno funky, written by Ray, titled "Now", a claim that things are "right" where they should. Ray has the last word, as his conga solo closes the album in a beautiful example of controlled intensity. Leaving witness the start of the group would become known as the most powerful of what became known as The Era of Salsa set.

PARTICIPANTS:

Ray Barretto - Musical Director, Congas
Adalberto Santiago - lead vocals on "Mi Ritmo Te Llama" "Look De Frente", "Now", Güiro in "Abidjian", lead vocals on "Abidjian" section bembé
Roberto Rodriguez - Principal trumpet
Joseph "Papy" Roman - Trumpet
René Lopez - lead vocals on "Hard Hands," "Got To Have You," "New York Soul" trumpet solo on "Love Beads"
Orestes Vilató - Timpani drums in "Love Beads "and" New York Soul "
Tony Fuentes - Bongo Cowbell bell Cha-Cha in "Love Beads" Key in "Abidjian"
Louis Cruz - Piano
Bobby "Mr. Soul "Valentin -" Baby "Ampeg Bass
Willie Torres and Jimmy Sabater - Coro
Jimmy Sabater - Members Exclamations - ("Ray Que Pasa ?, etc.) in" New York Soul "

Produced by Ray Barretto
Executive Producer - Jerry Masucci
All arrangements were supervised by Ray Barretto, except "Love Beads" and "Look Front", made ​​by Louis Cruz.
Recorded in Century Sound in NYC
Recording Engineer: Brooks Arthur
Cover and all original photographs: Leon Gast
original cover design: Izzy Sanabria

Written by Bobby Sanabria