s

Bobby Paunetto

El Sonido Moderno/The Seeco Sessions

$1.50

Bobby Paunetto

El Sonido Moderno/The Seeco Sessions

$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
Aguantando
Mi Flor Tropical
Is It Tasty?
Alfie
Why Is Woody Sad?
Mambo Sevilla
El Señor Sid
Dig It Like This
Chinatown
Pero Dime Tu
Olvidado
Aquí Voy Yo
No-Van-Co
Mi Paso
De Mi Amor
Guajira Dulce

Recognized as one of the rarest treasures in the history of Latin jazz, El Sonido Moderno rightfully takes its place among the most elusive, sought-after gems ever pressed to vinyl. When you listen to the unique stylings of Bobby Vince Paunetto, the cool, jazzy vibes finely interwoven into the fabric of the clave, you are experiencing a truly extraordinary sound. Like Sabu’s Jazz Espagnole and Mark Weinstein’s Cuban Roots, Paunetto’s El Sonido Moderno was too progressive for its time but now is finally given the recognition it deserves. Had it not been for Paunetto’s debilitating illness, he would surely have been one of the most celebrated Latin jazz artists of our time. Fortunately for us, we are now able to experience the “Modern Sounds” of Bobby Vince Paunetto, and, for the first time ever, the ultra-rare Seeco sessions are reissued in their entirety. Bobby Vince Paunetto was born June 22, 1944, into a family of Italian and Catalonian descent. Originally from Brooklyn, the Paunettos soon settled into a middle-class home in the Bronx where Bobby Vince and his two older brothers, Raymond and William (later honored in Paunetto’s composition “Brother Will”) would soon come of age. The boys’ mother, Rosemarie, loved to sing tangos and dance the Lindy and occasionally performed at social gatherings. In 1949, Rosemarie took Bobby Vince (at the tender age of five) to audition as a dancer at the famed Roxy Theatre, a place that also bore witness to the genius of Mr. Fred Astaire. And though the family spoke English at home, Rosemarie was able to speak Spanish well enough to later compose beautiful lyrics to her son’s music (on the Seeco 45s). Though Paunetto was exposed to a wide variety of music at home, he got his first real taste of jazz listening to radio eccentric Douglas “Jocko” Henderson (“Mr. Oo-Papa-Doo, How Do You Do!”), often credited as being one of the very first rappers. “When I heard Charlie Parker,” Paunetto remembers, “with that saxophone that was faster than the speed of light, I really flipped.” And as far as his exquisite taste in Latin music, Bobby Vince has his older brother Raymond to thank. “Ray would go dancing at the Palladium and see all the great Latin bands, like Tito Puente, and I learned a lot about the music from him.” But it was athletics that led Paunetto to his big break. A gifted athlete, he was honored in 1959 as one of the best athletes in New York’s public schools. Then in 1961, as Paunetto remembers, “Pat Patrick, the great saxophonist from Sun Ra’s Arkestra, knew one of the administrators from the youth athletic association, and he invited our whole basketball team to see Cal Tjader in concert at the Yorkville Casino in Manhattan. Patrick introduced us to Tjader before the concert. After his set, Cal sat back down at his table in the front with his wife, Pat. The next thing I knew, they were patting the seat next to them and motioning for me to come join them at the table.” The Tjaders bonded with Paunetto, so much so that the vibes master and the missus gave the young jazz fan their home address and phone number, extending their warmth and friendship. That same year, Bobby Vince got a pleasant surprise when he opened up Tjader’s Verve album In a Latin Bag and noticed the tune “Pauneto’s Point,” which was written in his honor (if misspelled). “Cal made me a part of MGM history by composing this tune for me,” muses Paunetto, sensing the historical importance of this gesture. “Cal was a sincere human being.” In fact, not only was Tjader instrumental in fueling the fire of Paunetto’s desire to become a vibraphonist, Cal (along with his drummer and fellow mallet man Johnny Rae) generously assisted Bobby Vince in obtaining his first set of vibes. “Nineteen sixty-two was a very important year for me,” Paunetto says, “because in addition to Cal and Johnny Rae helping me get the vibes, I also purchased an inexpensive piano so I could start working on compositions.” While still retaining some of his youthful zest for sports, Paunetto immersed himself completely in his newfound passion and could be heard practicing vibes for up to seven hours a day. Within a year, he surprised even Tjader himself as Paunetto’s band opened for him at the Embassy Ballroom. Paunetto was quickly gaining experience on the New York scene with appearances at the Village Gate and other hot spots around town. Then, in 1963, he recorded a two-song demo, which included “Something for O.M.” and “Mambo Sevilla,” (the former was retitled as “Algo Para O.M.” without his permission, and the latter was rerecorded for El Sonido Moderno). The following year, he recorded a demo of another original composition, “Aguantando,” which was also redone, with vocals this time, for Sonido Moderno. The young vibraphonist’s efforts were not in vain; the demos quickly caught the attention of Howard Roseff, vice president of Seeco Records, who wasted no time in convincing his older cousin, Seeco owner Sidney Siegel, to sign Paunetto to the label. These Seeco 45s, reissued in their entirety for the first time here, hint at the greatness that was to come in future Paunetto recordings. Recorded live (with no overdubs) in 1965, these singles are a tasty mix of soulful guajiras, jazzy mambos, and a stunning bolero that is simply out of this world. What’s impressive is that this twenty-one-year-old, who had only been playing vibes for three years, had the talent and the chutzpah to record with members of the upper echelon of Latin music, with luminaries like bassist Bobby Rodríguez Sr. of the Tito Puente and Machito orchestras. On timbales was John “Dandy” Rodríguez (also from the Puente band), who at only eighteen was already a seasoned pro. Frankie Malabe, heard on bongos on these sessions, was a member of the famed Alegre All-Stars, and Paunetto’s neighborhood friend, Jimmy Centeno, took care of business on congas (he would also later be featured with Puente). At the piano was another young talent who would later become a main fixture in the Puente organization, the great Sonny Bravo. With such a strong, tight ensemble of maestros, Paunetto would need to select the finest of Latin vocalists to bring his music to life, and he sure knew how to pick ’em. On lead vocals was Willie Torres of Joe Cuba fame, later featured on Ocho’s Latin-soul classic “Undress My Mind.” Singing coro (background) were both Santitos Colón (Tito Puente Orchestra) and Chivirico Dávila, from the Alegre All-Stars. It’s safe to say that on this musical voyage, Paunetto flew first class. Alto saxophonist Art Terrero, though perhaps not as well known, sounds right at home with the titans, providing some inspired blowing over Paunetto’s intricate arrangements. After recording the Seeco 45s, Paunetto’s musical career would then have to take the backseat, as he was drafted into the U.S. Army on August 17, 1965. As Paunetto recalls, “I was a Navy cadet from the age of ten to fourteen, so I already knew how to handle a weapon and everything.” Fortunately for the music world, he was honorably discharged in early 1967. As Paunetto tells Max Salazar in Latin Beat magazine, “First thing I did was get a group together, which included Ray Cruz (Cruz Control) on timbales. Tito Puente hooked me up with Morris Levy of Roulette Records, and I signed a one-year contract to record for the Mardi-Gras label.” Puente was proud of the young vibraphonist, and, according to Paunetto, “Tito would often introduce me to people, pointing at me with a smile, saying, ‘This is a very talented man.’” The fact that none other than Tito Puente himself wrote the original liner notes to El Sonido Moderno speaks volumes—when “El Rey” talks, people listen. As Bobby Vince Paunetto was faithfully serving his country, a new Latin-soul sound was erupting on the streets of Nueva York, and young boogaloo bands were popping up on every block. While many of the established Latin bandleaders dismissed the boogaloo as nothing more than a passing trend, it was still a force to be reckoned with, and even artists such as the great Machito, Eddie Palmieri, and the King himself (TP), would eventually record their own versions of this new groove. Sadly, many of the young boogaloo outfits were content to recycle the same predictable chord changes and melodies, but Paunetto’s Latin-soul sound was uniquely fresh. El Sonido Moderno expresses his original concept of blending typical Latin rhythms with the new soul sounds of the ’60s, enhancing them with his own brand of jazzy sophistication. From the deep, head sounds of “Aguantando” to the funky flavor of “Chinatown” and “El Señor Sid,” El Sonido Moderno delivers the goods with a healthy dose of soul and sabor. As extraordinary as Paunetto’s Modern Sound is, it may have been a little too hip for the mainstream, and with very little promotional support, this epic recording slipped right through the cracks. As Paunetto tells Max Salazar in Latin Beat, “The LP got zero airplay; the popular DJs were promoting the Cotique and Fania artists.” To make matters worse, his own label, Mardi-Gras, even misspelled his surname on the cover. Paunetto, however, was undaunted by this apparent setback, and, thanks to a GI Bill and letters of recommendation from music legends Cal Tjader and Mongo Santamaria, the young bandleader was soon accepted into the famed Berklee College of Music, where he would study under vibes master Gary Burton. His years at Berklee helped him expand his musical knowledge, adding greater depth and texture to his sound, which would lend itself perfectly to the burgeoning jazz-funk fusion that was quickly gaining popularity in Latin music. Shortly after graduating Berklee in 1973, Bobby Vince Paunetto began blazing a new trail, cofounding with his brother Raymond the appropriately named Pathfinder Records. The freshly inspired bandleader wasted no time in putting together another all-star cast of players, that included Manny Oquendo, John “Dandy” Rodríguez, Milton Cardona, and Jerry González on percussion; Andy Gonzáles on bass, Mario Rivera on sax, Alfredo de la Fé on violin, as well as many of his talented Berklee alumni. His first self-produced recording, Paunetto’s Point (in Cal’s honor), was nominated for a Grammy in 1975–’76, and his second album, 1977’s Commit to Memory, was also critically acclaimed, earning the vibraphonist a place among the most highly respected musicians on the scene. Paunetto, now with two highly praised recordings on his own label, was moving in the direction of his dreams. Then the unthinkable happened. In 1978, Bobby Vince was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and his ability to perform and compose was greatly compromised. Though he was dealt a serious blow that would challenge him to his very core, Paunetto remained steadfast and never gave up on his dream. In fact, since being diagnosed with MS, the vibraphonist and pianist has composed hundreds of contemporary jazz tunes and, while his disease was in remission, was able to record two discs, Composer in Public (1996) and Reconstituted (1999). To this day, Bobby Vince Paunetto continues to write both straight-ahead and Latin jazz compositions and has his sights on recording more of his innovative sounds. While these days the word “artist” is lauded upon so many undeserving of its title, Bobby Vince Paunetto is the real deal, and it is these timeless recordings that have earned this genuine artist his well-deserved place in music history. Liner notes by Miles Perlich Miles Perlich wishes to thank Bobby Vince Paunetto, John “Dandy” Rodriguez, Willie Torres, Sonny Bravo, Martin Perlich, Ted Myers, Bobby Matos, Steve Kader, Adam Rundquist, and Luis Gonzalez. Bobby Paunetto El Sonido Moderno (Mardi-Gras 5030) Originally released in January 1968 Produced by Pancho Cristal The Seeco Sessions (Seeco) Originally released on 45 in 1965 All songs arranged by Bobby Paunetto Remastered by Wax Poetics Mastering El Sonido Moderno 1. Aguantando 2. Mi Flor Tropical 3. Is It Tasty? 4. Alfie 5. Why Is Woody Sad? 6. Mambo Sevilla 7. El Señor Sid 8. Dig It Like This 9. Chinatown 10. Pero Dime Tu The Seeco Sessions 11. Olvidado 12. Aquí Voy Yo 13. No-Van-Co 14. Mi Paso 15. De Mi Amor 16. Guajira Dulce El Sonido Moderno musicians Bobby Paunetto: vibes and marimba John Marrero: piano Art Ferrero: alto sax Fernando Oquendo: bass Tony Centeno: vocals, gourd tambourine Ray Cruz: timbales Ray Miranda: timbales (“Mambo Sevilla” only) Tommy López: congas Jimmy Centeno: drums (traps) John “Dandy” Rodríguez: bongos, conga, cowbell Henry Zapata: bass (“Mambo Sevilla” only) The Seeco Sessions musicians Bobby Paunetto: vibes Bobby Rodríguez Sr.: bass John “Dandy” Rodríguez: timbales Frankie Malabe: bongos, percussion Jimmy Centeno: conga Sonny Bravo: piano Willie Torres: lead vocal Santos Colón: coro Chivirico Dávila: coro Reconocido como uno de los tesoros más raros en la historia del jazz latino, El Sonido Moderno ocupa un puesto legítimo entre las gemas más elusivas y más buscadas que jamás se hayan grabado en vinilo. Cuando usted escucha los estilos únicos de Bobby Vince Paunetto, su fresco vibráfono estilo jazz finamente entretejido con la textura de la clave, usted experimenta un sonido verdaderamente extraordinario. Como el Jazz Espagnole de Sabú y Cuban Roots de Mark Weinstein, El Sonido Moderno de Paunetto era demasiado progresista para su época pero en la actualidad por fin recibe el reconocimiento que merece. Si no hubiera sido por la enfermedad debilitante de Paunetto, con toda seguridad hubiera sido uno de los artistas de jazz latino más celebrados de nuestros tiempos. Por suerte para nosotros, ahora podemos experimentar el sonido moderno de Bobby Vince Paunetto, y por primera vez se vuelven a producir en su totalidad las ultra raras sesiones de Seeco. Bobby Vince Paunetto nació el 22 de junio de 1944, en el seno de una familia de ascendencia italiana y catalana. Oriundos de Brooklyn, los Paunetto pronto se acomodaron en una casa de clase media en el Bronx, donde Bobby Vince y sus 2 hermanos mayores, Raymond y William (más tarde homenajeado en la composición de Paunetto “Brother Will”) pronto serían mayores de edad. A la madre de los chicos, Rosemarie, le encantaba cantar tangos y bailar el Lindy y actuaba ocasionalmente en reuniones sociales. En 1949, Rosemarie llevó a Bobby Vince (a la tierna edad de 5 años) a una audición de bailarín en el afamado Teatro Roxy, un lugar que también fue testigo del genio del Sr. Fred Astaire. Aunque la familia hablaba inglés en casa, Rosemarie hablaba el español lo suficientemente bien como para componer bellas letras para la música de su hijo (en los discos 45 de Seeco). Aunque Paunetto fue expuesto a una gran variedad de música en su hogar, probó el jazz por primera vez al escuchar al excéntrico de la radio Douglas “Jocko” Henderson (“Mr. Oo-Papa-Doo, How Do You Do!”), con frecuencia reconocido como uno de los primeros raperos. “Cuando escuché a Charlie Parker”, recuerda Paunetto, “con aquel saxofón más rápido que la velocidad de la luz, mi vida dio un vuelco”. Y en cuanto a su exquisito gusto por la música latina, Bobby Vince se lo agradece a Raymond, su hermano mayor. “Ray se iba a bailar al Palladium a ver a todas las grandes bandas latinas, como Tito Puente. De él yo aprendí mucho de la música”. Pero fue el atletismo lo que llevó a Paunetto a su gran oportunidad. Atleta nato, fue galardonado en 1959 como uno de los mejores atletas de las escuelas públicas de Nueva York. Luego en 1961, según lo recuerda Paunetto, “Pat Patrick, el gran saxofonista de la Arkestra de Sun Ra, conoció a uno de los administradores de la asociación atlética juvenil, e invitó a todo nuestro equipo de baloncesto a ver a Cal Tjader en concierto en el Casino Yorkville de Manhattan. Patrick nos presentó a Tjader antes del concierto. Después de su presentación, Cal se sentó en la mesa del frente con su esposa, Pat. Y de pronto me indicaron el asiento que estaba junto a ellos y me hicieron señas de que los acompañara a la mesa”. Los Tjaders se compenetraron muy bien con Paunetto, tanto que el maestro del vibráfono y su señora le dieron al joven fanático del jazz su dirección y número telefónico, extendiéndole su calidez y amistad. Ese mismo año, Bobby Vince recibió una agradable sorpresa cuando abrió el álbum de Verve de Tjader In a Latin Bag y observó la canción “Pauneto’s Point”, que había sido escrita en su honor (o mal escrita, notando la falta de ortografía). “Cal me hizo formar parte de la historia de MGM al componer esa canción para mí”, reflexiona Paunetto al percibir la importancia histórica de este gesto. “Cal fue un ser humano sincero”. De hecho, no solamente fue Tjader un elemento detonante del fuego del deseo de Paunetto de convertirse en un virtuoso del vibráfono, sino que Cal (junto con su baterista y percusionista Johnny Rae) generosamente ayudó a Bobby Vince a conseguir su primer vibráfono. “El año 1962 fue un año muy importante para mí”, dice Paunetto, “porque además de la ayuda de Cal y Johnny Rae para conseguir el vibráfono, también compré un piano por un bajo precio para poder comenzar a componer”. Aunque todavía retenía algo de su ímpetu juvenil para los deportes, Paunetto se sumergió completamente en su recién descubierta pasión y se le podía oír practicando el vibráfono hasta 7 horas diarias. En el curso de un año incluso sorprendió al mismo Tjader cuando la banda de Paunetto abrió su presentación en el Embassy Ballroom. Paunetto ganaba experiencia rápidamente en el escenario neoyorquino con presentaciones en la Village Gate y otros lugares que estaban de moda en la ciudad. Luego, en 1963, grabó un demo de 2 canciones, que incluía “Something for O.M” y “Mambo Sevilla”, (el primero fue rebautizado como “Algo Para O.M”. sin su autorización, y el segundo se volvió a grabar para El Sonido Moderno). Al siguiente año grabó un demo de otra composición original, “Aguantando”, que fue regrabada, con voces esta vez, para Sonido Moderno. Los esfuerzos del joven vibrafonista no fueron en vano; los demos llamaron rápidamente la atención de Howard Roseff, vicepresidente de Seeco Records, que no perdió tiempo en convencer al primo mayor de Paunetto, el propietario de Seeco Sidney Siegel, para que integrara a Paunetto a la disquera. Estos discos 45 de Seeco, re-emitidos en su totalidad aquí por primera vez, son un preludio de la grandeza que estaba por venir en las grabaciones futuras de Paunetto. Grabado en vivo (sin sobreposiciones) en 1965, estos sencillos son una deliciosa mezcla de guajiras conmovedoras, animados mambos, y un estremecedor bolero que sencillamente es algo fuera de este mundo. Lo impresionante es que este joven de 21 años, que sólo se había pasado tres años tocando el vibráfono, tuvo el talento y el chutzpah para grabar con miembros de la crema y nata de la música latina, con luminarias como el bajista Bobby Rodríguez Sr., de las orquestas de Tito Puente y Machito. En los timbales estaba John “Dandy” Rodríguez (también de la banda de Puente), quien a la escasa edad de 18 años ya era un todo un profesional. Frankie Malabe, a cargo de los bongós en estas sesiones, era miembro de la afamada Alegre All-Stars, y el amigo del barrio de Paunetto Jimmy Centeno, se encargó de las congas (posteriormente desempeñaría un papel estelar con Puente). En el piano se encontraba otro joven talento que posteriormente se convertiría en un elemento principal de la banda de Puente, el gran Sonny Bravo. Con un grupo tan fuerte y estrecho de maestros, Paunetto tendría que seleccionar al mejor grupo de vocalistas latinos para dar vida a su música y supo seleccionarlos de manera muy natural. En la voz principal estaba Willie Torres, quien se hiciera famoso con Joe Cuba, destacado posteriormente en el clásico latino de Ocho “Undress My Mind”. Los cantantes del coro (en el fondo) eran Santitos Colón (Orquesta de Tito Puente) y Chivirico Dávila, de los Alegre All-Stars. Se puede decir con certeza que en este viaje musical, Paunetto viajaba en primera clase. El saxofonista alto Art Terrero, aunque quizás no tan conocido, se siente como en casa con los titanes, proporcionando algunas notas inspiradas sobre los intrincados arreglos de Paunetto. Después de grabar los discos 45 de Seeco, la carrera musical de Paunetto tendría que pasar al fondo al ser llamado al ejército estadounidense el 17 de agosto de 1965. Según recuerda Paunetto, “Fui un cadete de la marina desde los 10 hasta los 14 años de edad, por lo que ya sabía cómo manejar un arma y todo”. Por suerte para el mundo de la música, fue dado de baja con honores a principios de 1967. Según dice Paunetto a Max Salazar en la revista Latin Beat, “Lo primero que hice fue integrar un grupo, que incluía a Ray Cruz (Cruz Control) en los timbales. Tito Puente me conectó con Morris Levy de Roulette Records, y firmé un contrato de un 1 año para grabar con la disquera Mardi-Gras”. Puente estaba orgulloso del joven intérprete del vibráfono y, según Paunetto, “Tito con frecuencia me presentaba a la gente, señalándome con una sonrisa y diciendo, ‘Este es un hombre de mucho talento.’” El hecho de que ningún otro que el mismo Tito Puente haya escrito las notas originales de la portada de El Sonido Moderno habla muy bien de él—cuando “El Rey” habla, la gente escucha. Debido a que Bobby Vince Paunetto se encontraba fielmente sirviendo a su país, un nuevo sonido de soul latino surgía en las calles de Nueva York, y las jóvenes bandas de boogaloo surgían en cada esquina. Aunque muchos de los líderes de las bandas latinas establecidas menospreciaban el boogaloo como una simple tendencia pasajera, éste seguía siendo una fuerza digna de tomarse en cuenta e incluso los artistas de la talla del gran Machito, Eddie Palmieri, y el Rey mismo (TP) a la larga grabarían sus propias versiones de esta nueva onda. La tristeza es que muchos de los conjuntos jóvenes de boogaloo se contentaban con reciclar los mismos y predecibles cambios de acordes y melodías, pero el sonido de soul latino de Paunetto era fresco de forma singular. El Sonido Moderno expresa su concepto original de mezclar los ritmos latinos típicos con los nuevos sonidos de soul de los años 60, mejorándolos con su propia marca de sofisticación al estilo jazz. Desde los sonidos profundos de “Aguantando” hasta el sabor de “Chinatown” y “El Señor Sid”, El Sonido Moderno transmite el sentimiento con una dosis saludable de soul y sabor. Con todo lo extraordinario que es el Sonido Moderno de Paunetto, puede haber resultado demasiado moderno para la gran mayoría, y debido al muy poco apoyo promocional que recibió esta grabación histórica se perdió en la nada. Como dice Paunetto a Max Salazar en Latin Beat, “El LP tuvo cero emisiones al aire; los DJ populares promovían a los artistas de Cotique y Fania”. Para empeorar las cosas, su propia disquera, Mardi-Gras, se equivocó al escribir su nombre en la portada. Sin embargo, Paunetto no se inmutó por esta aparente desventaja y, gracias a un decreto para ayudar a los veteranos de guerra y a las cartas de recomendación de las leyendas de la música Cal Tjader y Mongo Santamaría, el joven director de orquesta pronto fue aceptado en el famoso Berklee College of Music, donde estudiaría bajo el virtuoso del vibráfono Gary Burton. Sus años en Berklee le ayudaron a ampliar sus conocimientos musicales añadiendo mayor profundidad y textura a sus sonidos, lo que se adaptaría perfectamente a la floreciente fusión entre el jazz y el funk que estaba ganando popularidad a paso veloz en la música latina. Poco después de graduarse de Berklee en 1973, Bobby Vince Paunetto comenzó a abrirse un nuevo camino al fundar, con su hermano Raymond, la disquera apropiadamente llamada Pathfinder Records. El recién inspirado director de orquesta no perdió tiempo en integrar otro elenco estelar de músicos, que incluía a Manny Oquendo, John “Dandy” Rodríguez, Milton Cardona y Jerry González en la percusión; Andy Gonzáles en el bajo, Mario Rivera en el saxofón, Alfredo de la Fé en el violín, así como muchos de sus talentosos ex compañeros de Berklee. La primera grabación que produjo, Paunetto’s Point (en honor de Cal), fue nominada para un Grammy en 1975–’76, y su segundo álbum, Commit to Memory, en 1977, fue también aclamado por la crítica, otorgando al intérprete del vibráfono un lugar entre los músicos más respetados del medio. Paunetto, ahora con 2 grabaciones altamente elogiadas y producidas por su propia disquera, se estaba moviendo en la dirección de sus sueños. Entonces sucedió lo inimaginable. En 1978, se diagnosticó a Bobby Vince con esclerosis múltiple, y su capacidad para tocar y componer se vio seriamente afectada. Aunque para él fue un golpe muy grave que lo desafiaría hasta la médula, Paunetto permaneció firme y nunca renunció a su sueño. De hecho, desde que recibió el diagnóstico de esclerosis múltiple, el intérprete de vibráfono y piano ha compuesto cientos de melodías contemporáneas de jazz y pudo grabar 2 discos, Composer in Public (1996) y Reconstituted (1999), mientras su enfermedad estaba en remisión. Hasta el día de hoy, Bobby Vince Paunetto sigue escribiendo tanto composiciones en línea recta como de jazz latino y tiene la mirada puesta en grabar más de sus sonidos innovadores. Aunque en estos días la palabra “artista” se aplica como elogio a tantos que no merecen ese título, Bobby Vince Paunetto es legítimo, y son estas grabaciones imperecederas las que han ganado a este artista genuino su bien merecido lugar en la historia de la música. Notas de portada de Miles Perlich Miles Perlich desea darle las gracias a Bobby Vince Paunetto, John “Dandy” Rodriguez, Willie Torres, Sonny Bravo, Martin Perlich, Ted Myers, Bobby Matos, Steve Kader, Adam Rundquist, y a Luis Gonzalez Bobby Paunetto El Sonido Moderno (Mardi-Gras 5030) Estreno original: enero de 1968 Producción de Pancho Cristal The Seeco Sessions (Seeco) Lanzamiento original en 45 rpm en 1965 Todas las canciones son arreglos de Bobby Paunetto Remasterización de Wax Poetics Mastering El Sonido Moderno 1. Aguantando 2. Mi Flor Tropical 3. Is It Tasty? 4. Alfie 5. Why Is Woody Sad? 6. Mambo Sevilla 7. El Señor Sid 8. Dig It Like This 9. Chinatown 10. Pero Dime Tú The Seeco Sessions 11. Olvidado 12. Aquí Voy Yo 13. No-Van-Co 14. Mi Paso 15. De Mi Amor 16. Guajira Dulce Músicos de El Sonido Moderno Bobby Paunetto: vibráfono y marimba John Marrero: piano Art Ferrero: saxofón alto Fernando Oquendo: bajo Tony Centeno: voces, pandereta calabaza Ray Cruz: timbales Ray Miranda: timbales (“Mambo Sevilla” únicamente) Tommy López: congas Jimmy Centeno: batería (de trampa) John “Dandy” Rodríguez: bongós, conga, cencerro Henry Zapata: bajo (“Mambo Sevilla” únicamente) Músicos de The Seeco Sessions Bobby Paunetto: vibráfono Bobby Rodríguez Sr.: bajo John “Dandy” Rodríguez: timbales Frankie Malabe: bongós, percusión Jimmy Centeno: conga Sonny Bravo: piano Willie Torres: primera voz Santos Colón: coro Chivirico Dávila: coro