s

Celia Cruz

Azucar - A Lady And Her Music

$1.29

Celia Cruz

Azucar - A Lady And Her Music

$15.99 Album
$15.99 Album
$15.99 Album
El Yerberito Moderno
Suavecito
La Guarachera
Me Acuerdo De Ti
Oye Mi Consejo
Bravo
Guantanamera
Cuando Sali De Cuba
Metida Con You
Mi Treque, Treque
Aquarius/Let The Sun Shine In
Bomboro Quina
Salsa De Tomate
Dile Que Por Mi No Tema
Gracia Divina
Bemba Colora
La Negra Tiene Tumbao
Quimbara
Toro Mata
Cucala
Ritmo, Tambor Y Flores
Usted Abuso
Burundanga
El Guaba
Encantado De La Vida
Soy Antillana
La Dicha Mia
Berimbau
Nadie Se Salva De La Rumba
Bamboleo
El Chisme
El Negro Bembon

The memory of Celia Cruz is plagued with misunderstanding. When they remember her, casual fans of Latin music evoke her colorful wigs, glamorous outfits and the instantly hummable hits that she recorded during the last chapter of her career (one of them, the rap-meets-salsa smash "La Negra Tiene Tumbao," is included in this collection). Celia Cruz and her prodigious discography captured the very essence of tropical music. The tracks in this anthology prove that she possessed one of the most seductive voices in the history of Latin American music. Furthermore, her astute choice of repertoire and her knack for surrounding herself with the right bandleaders and producers (from Tito Puente and Memo Salamanca to Johnny Pacheco, Willie Colón and Ray Barretto) allowed her to transcend the usual clichés that regard salsa as "hot" music for "passionate" people. Celia's career traces the development of the entire tropical genre, from the obvious dominance of Cuba during the golden era of Latin music to the emergence of the Nuyorican salsa explosion as a potent cultural phenomenon and the subsequent appearance of the Miami sound and its influence on a more commercial brand of tropical pop. Unlike other divas who remained forever associated with the specific era that witnessed their artistic peak (the '50s for Machito's vocalist Graciela, the '60s for soulful La Lupe), Celia learned to evolve with the times, changing her songbook in subtle ways and yet remaining her endearing self. Through the power of Celia's voice, the Afro-Cuban arena became a platform for the expression of myriad feelings: life-loving exuberance, romantic regret, unrestrained joy, stubborn optimism and deep nostalgia for the homeland that she left behind. Celia Cruz was born the second of four children in the Havana neighborhood of Barrio Santo Suárez. At an early age, she realized that there was something about her voice that made people happy. When her parents entrusted her with the care of her younger siblings, Celia would entertain them by singing popular Cuban songs. Neighbors from nearby apartments would congregate in front of her house and stay there for hours, listening to the small girl with the beautiful voice. Celia's father advised her against a musical career. He thought that the clubs and cabarets where live music was being performed at the time in Cuba were no place for his young daughter. Instead, he insisted that she should become a schoolteacher. Because she adored her father and did not want to disappoint him, Celia followed his advice and graduated with teaching credentials. At the same time, and thanks to a liberal aunt who was invested in coming to the aid of her oppressed niece, she began visiting the local night clubs, becoming acquainted with the richness of contemporary Cuban music. The '40s and '50s were a time of tremendous creativity for the island's music; where everything centered on the son, Cuba's protean song format. Like most Latin genres, the son is a combination of three different influences: European melody, African rhythm and indigenous flavor. The son, which was born in the Oriente province during the 1880s and arrived to Havana around 1909, was originally performed using a rustic configuration of stringed instruments, minor percussion and, later on, a solitary trumpet. It was during the '40s and '50s – decades that were essential to Celia's artistic formation – that the format experienced its defining evolution when seminal bandleaders such as Arsenio Rodríguez, Félix Chapottín and Pérez Prado incorporated piano, congas and a variety of brass instruments to the mix. At that point, the son began sounding very much like the electrifying music that would eventually become known all over the world as salsa. "Today we call it salsa," Celia told me during an interview conducted a few years before her death in 2003. "Before, we would call it by whatever particular dance style it was: rumba, guaracha, mambo, guajira, guaguancó. These are the folkloric rhythms of my country, the different styles that exist in Cuba. I've never had a problem with the term salsa, because we've all spent decades earning a living by performing this music. But my friend Tito Puente would get really upset whenever he heard that word. 'Salsa is something you eat,' he'd say fuming. 'This is Afro-Cuban music.' And Tito wasn't even Cuban. He was Puerto Rican." Inspired by the musical happenings around her, Celia began competing in local radio talent shows – and winning. Curiously enough, a tango was her first song of choice. It was soon followed by dozens of radio appearances interpreting boleros and more upbeat material. Celia's big break – the one that would forever solidify her career – came in June of 1950, when she was invited by the legendary Sonora Matancera to replace original vocalist Myrta Silva, who was leaving the band and returning to her native Puerto Rico. Formed in 1924 under the original name of La Tuna Liberal, La Sonora Matancera had, just like the son itself, spent decades perfecting its sound and instrumentation. When it enlisted Celia, the group had become an institution, recording at a breakneck speed and departing for lengthy tours all over the Americas. La Matancera's most important innovation was adding a pop sensibility to authentic Afro-Caribbean dance styles. Under the leadership of guitarist and musical director Rogelio Martínez, the group perfected the concept of the spicy, three-minute tropical hit single. This was definitely not a traditional son ensemble relying solely on folklore. By the time she recorded her first 78 RPM session with the group, which included her now immortal renditions of the majestic "Mata Siguaraya" and the playful "Cao Cao Maní Picao," Celia had won over the hearts of Matancera's staunchest fans. Celia remained with the band for the next 15 years, recording a vast amount of hits. Her throaty pipes infused vitality to even the most pedestrian of Matancera tunes. She was equally adept at the slow boleros and the more party-friendly material, but her forte was the African-oriented side of her repertoire – the rumbas and the pregones. The revolution spearheaded by Fidel Castro found the Sonora Matancera at the peak of its popularity. Not content with the new regime, the band left Cuba on a routine trip to Mexico – a tour from which it never returned. Celia saw her beloved homeland for the last time on July 15, 1960. In 1965, Celia ended her 15-year run with the Matancera. But the successful solo career that the singer and her husband Pedro Knight had fantasized about failed to materialize, even though she recorded sterling albums in Mexico with bandleader Memo Salamanca, and as the singer with the Tito Puente orchestra in New York. Together, Celia and Tito recorded eight exquisite albums – and continued collaborating sporadically until the bandleader's death in the year 2000. A few months before his passing, Tito Puente told me over dinner that of all the singers that had ever accompanied him, Celia had always been his personal favorite. "There's nobody in the whole word who could sing like her," he said. "It was a very strong combination when we played together. Celia is a very educated and intelligent person. She's unique. I've played with her 588 times. She's kept count, and she has the memory of an elephant." Selections from these albums take up the lion's share of Disc 1. If you are new to this material, prepare yourself to be dazzled. There are supremely emotional boleros ("Me Acuerdo De Ti," about Celia's nostalgia for Cuba), sinuous nuggets of Afro-Cuban perfection ("Bómboro Quiñá"), blistering Sonora Matancera covers ("Cao Cao Maní Picao"), and delightful pastiches of Latin funk ("Aquarius/Let The Sun Shine In"). Unfortunately, the albums failed to connect with a youth that, at the time, was enamored with rock 'n roll. By the early '70s, Celia was in dire need of a comeback project with serious commercial potential. Miraculously, she positioned herself in the midst of perhaps the most important movement in the annals of Afro-Caribbean music – the salsa explosion unleashed by Fania. Founded by impresario Jerry Masucci and Dominican bandleader/flutist Johnny Pacheco in 1964, Fania gathered the most talented musicians of the time under one roof, blending the percolating combustion of Afro-Cuban rhythms with the swing of American jazz and the urban influence of R&B. To this day, the Fania catalogue represents the apex of tropical music, the standard against which all subsequent efforts continue to be measured. There's no denying the cathartic power of the earlier, more traditional examples of the Afro-Cuban canon. But seminal efforts by the likes of Pacheco, Rubén Blades, Willie Colón, Héctor Lavoe, Eddie Palmieri and the Fania All Stars took the entire genre to another level by adding to it a modernist approach, social commentary and an omnivorous taste for outside influences. It was one of the label's biggest stars, keyboardist, bandleader and Cuban music fanatic Larry Harlow, who invited Celia to participate in his 1973 Latin opera Hommy. She performed the hit "Gracia Divina," introducing herself to a new generation of fans. Later the same year, an extended concert performance of the standard "Bemba Colorá" at the Yankee Stadium (included in the second volume of the two LP set Live At Yankee Stadium) sealed the deal. Celia Cruz had become Fania's own Queen of Salsa. In 1974, Pacheco, whose orchestra updated the Cuban conjunto textures of the Matancera with punchy, brassier arrangements, invited Celia to record with him. The resulting album, Celia & Johnny, was a stunning artistic triumph that catapulted the singer to a level of superstardom she had not even experienced with the Matancera. In the loving hands of Pacheco, Celia shone like a shooting star. The opening track alone, the volcanic, African-inflected "Químbara," was worth the prize of admission – a clear indication of Celia's almost supernatural vocal powers. Fittingly, "Químbara" is the opening track of Disc 2 in this anthology. To Fania's credit, the company treated Celia like the regal performer that she was. In subsequent years, she recorded a string of phenomenal albums with the label's most talented leaders: Pacheco, of course, but also Willie Colón, Papo Lucca (the virtuoso pianist with Puerto Rico's Sonora Ponceña) and Ray Barretto (their 1988 collaboration Ritmo En El Corazón gave Celia her first Grammy victory.) Under the guidance of Colón, she delved into Brazilian rhythms with excellent covers of samba and bossa nova nuggets like "Usted Abusó" and "Berimbau." "When Celia and I started working together, she was already an established artist," recalls Willie. "For me, it was like a graduation into the big leagues. But in the end, she was easier to work with than some of the younger divas from my generation. Celia was always willing to listen to ideas, no matter how silly they sounded. She knew that music was not an exact science. I think that was partially the key to her longevity." As part of the Fania All Stars, Celia performed live in the company of salsa singers of her own caliber such as Héctor Lavoe and Cheo Feliciano. With Pacheco as musical director, the band traveled to Africa where Celia was greeted as a goddess and performed raucous versions of "Químbara" and the Cuban favorite "Guantanamera." Celia’s career remained intact after Fania folded in the late ‘80s. By then, salsa fans around the globe had developed a voracious appetite for all things Celia. She quickly secured a recording contract with Ralph Mercado's RMM Records, the New York-based company that dominated salsa during most of the '90s, and switched to Sony for three highly successful albums (one of which was released posthumously in 2003). Toward the end of her career, Celia recorded the monster hits "Que Le Den Candela," "La Vida Es Un Carnaval" and "La Negra Tiene Tumbao." "I remember when we went to Africa together," Johnny Pacheco told me recently from his home in New York. "The president of the country sent two limousines to pick us up from the airport – one for me, and one for Celia. At one point, she said: 'We're here because of you, Johnny,' and that made feel so good. I asked her to sing 'Guantanamera' and the crowd went wild." Pacheco sounds melancholy as he remembers the unforgettable diva. "La voz de esa mujer," he whispers. "That woman's voice - it was just unbelievable. Out of this world." Written by Ernesto Lechner El recuerdo de Celia Cruz está lleno de malentendidos. Al evocarla, los seguidores ocasionales de la música latina mencionan sus coloridas pelucas, trajes glamorosos y los pegajosos éxitos que grabó durante el último capítulo de su carrera (uno de ellos, la salsa-con-rap de "La Negra Tiene Tumbao", está presente en esta colección). En realidad, Celia Cruz y su prodigiosa discografía captaron la esencia de la música tropical. Las canciones de esta antología demuestran que poseía una de las voces más seductoras en la historia de la música latina. A su vez, su olfato para elegir el repertorio adecuado y su astucia para rodearse con los mejores productores y directores de orquesta (desde Tito Puente y Memo Salamanca hasta Johnny Pacheco, Willie Colón y Ray Barretto) le permitieron trascender los lugares comunes que presentan a la salsa como un género "caliente" para gente "apasionada". La carrera de Celia traza el desarrollo del género tropical, desde el obvio dominio de Cuba durante la época dorada de la música latina hasta la explosión de la salsa de origen puertorriqueño en Nueva York como un fenómeno cultural y la aparición del sonido de Miami y su influencia en una variación más comercial de lo tropical. Contrariamente a otras divas que fueron asociadas a la época de su cúspide artística (los años '50 para Graciela, cantante de Machito, los '60 para La Lupe), Celia aprendió a evolucionar con el tiempo, cambiando sutilmente su repertorio sin perder las cualidades que la hacían entrañable. A través del poderío vocal de Celia, la música afrocaribeña se convirtió en una plataforma para expresar un arco iris de emociones: un apetito insaciable hacia la vida, penas del corazón, alegría contagiosa, un optimismo inacabable y la profunda nostalgia por la patria que había dejado atrás. La segunda de cuatro hijos, Celia Cruz nació en el barrio Santo Suárez de La Habana. Desde chiquita, se dio cuenta que había algo en su voz que le daba alegría a la gente. Cuando sus padres le encargaban el cuidado de sus hermanitos, Celia los entretenía cantando canciones populares cubanas. Los vecinos de los departamentos cercanos se congregaban delante de su casa y se quedaban allí por horas, escuchando a la niñita de la voz hermosa. El padre de Celia le aconsejó que no siguiera una carrera musical. Creía que los clubes y cabaretes donde se llevaban a cabo los conciertos en esa época no eran un lugar adecuado para su hija. Insistió que la muchacha tenía que ser maestra de escuela. Como adoraba a su papá y no quería decepcionarlo, Celia siguió su consejo y se graduó de maestra. Al mismo tiempo, y gracias a una tía liberal que quería ayudar a su sobrina oprimida, comenzó a frecuentar los clubes nocturnos, conociendo de cerca la riqueza de la música cubana. Los años '40 y '50 fueron un tiempo de gran creatividad para la música de la isla. El corazón de este movimiento era el son, el formato cubano por excelencia. Como la mayoría de géneros latinos, el son es una combinación de tres influencias distintas: melodía europea, ritmo africano y sabor indígena. El son, que había nacido en la provincia de Oriente durante la década de 1880 y llegó a La Habana allá por 1909, era interpretado originalmente por grupos rústicos de instrumentos de cuerda, percusión y, después, una trompeta. Fue durante los años '40 y '50 – décadas esenciales para la formación artística de Celia – que el formato pasó por su evolución definitiva cuando legendarios directores de orquesta como Arsenio Rodríguez, Félix Chapottín y Pérez Prado incorporaron piano, congas y una variedad de instrumentos de viento a la mezcla. En ese momento, el son comenzó a sonar como la música electrificante que eventualmente sería conocida en el mundo entero como salsa. "Ahora le dicen salsa", me comentó Celia durante una entrevista llevada a cabo unos años antes de su muerte, en 2003. "Antes, la llamábamos de acuerdo a su estilo particular: rumba, guaracha, mambo, guajira, guaguancó. Son los ritmos folklóricos de mi país, los estilos de Cuba. Yo nunca tuve problemas con la palabra salsa, porque hace ya décadas que nos ganamos la vida tocando esta música. Pero mi amigo Tito Puente se molestaba cuando escuchaba esa palabra. 'Salsa es algo para comer', decía bien enojado. 'Lo nuestro es música afrocubana'. Y eso que Tito ni siquiera era cubano. Era puertorriqueño". Inspirada por la revolución musical que ocurría a su alrededor, Celia comenzó a competir - y ganar - en concursos de estaciones radiales. Curiosamente, la primera canción que interpretó en la radio fue un tango. Le siguieron docenas de actuaciones, en las que interpretó boleros y temas bailables. Una gran oportunidad que solidificaría la carrera de Celia para siempre llegó en junio de 1950, cuando fue invitada por la legendaria Sonora Matancera para reemplazar a la cantante Myrta Silva, que había dejado el grupo para regresar a su Puerto Rico natal. Creada en 1924 bajo el nombre de La Tuna Liberal, La Sonora Matancera había pasado décadas, como el mismísimo son, perfeccionando su sonido e instrumentación. Cuando contrató a Celia, se había transformado en una institución, grabando asiduamente y realizando giras por todo el continente americano. La innovación más importante de La Matancera fue agregarle una sensibilidad pop a los estilos afrocaribeños. Bajo el liderazgo del guitarrista y director musical Rogelio Martínez, el grupo perfeccionó el concepto del éxito tropical de tres minutos de duración, redondito y sabroso. Evidentemente, estaba lejos de ser un conjunto de son apoyado en el folklore. Cuando grabó su primer disco de 78 rpm con el grupo, que incluía sus inmortales interpretaciones de "Mata Siguaraya" y "Cao Cao Maní Picao", Celia se había ganado el corazón de los fanáticos de La Matancera. Celia permaneció con la banda durante 15 años, grabando una gran cantidad de éxitos. Su voz chocolatosa le agregó vitalidad hasta a los temas más banales de La Matancera. Era igualmente dotada para los boleros y los temas bailables, pero su fuerte eran las canciones de inspiración netamente africana – las rumbas y los pregones. La revolución de Fidel Castro encontró a La Sonora Matancera en la cima de su popularidad. Descontentos con el nuevo régimen, los integrantes de la orquesta abandonaron Cuba en un viaje rutinario hacia México - una gira de la cual no regresarían jamás. Celia vio a su amada patria por última vez el 15 de julio de 1960. En 1965, la cantante terminó su relación de 15 años con La Matancera. Pero la exitosa carrera solista con la cual habían fantaseado Celia y su esposo Pedro Knight no logró despegar, pese a que grabó una serie de excelentes discos en México con el director de orquesta Memo Salamanca, y como vocalista de la banda de Tito Puente en Nueva York. Juntos, Celia y Tito grabaron ocho discos – y continuaron colaborando esporádicamente hasta la muerte del percusionista en el 2000. Unos meses antes de su fallecimiento, Tito Puente me contó durante una cena que de todos los cantantes que lo habían acompañado, Celia era de lejos su favorita. "No hay nadie que pueda cantar como ella", dijo. "Cuando tocábamos juntos, era una combinación muy fuerte. Celia es una persona educada y muy inteligente. Es única. Tocamos juntos 588 veces. Ella las contó, y tiene la memoria de un elefante". Las selecciones de estos discos ocupan la mayoría de la primera parte de esta compilación. A los que no conocen este material, los espera una agradable sorpresa. Hay boleros afiebrados ("Me Acuerdo De Ti", sobre la nostalgia de Celia por Cuba), sinuosas joyas de pura perfección afrocubana ("Bómboro Quiñá") y deliciosas ensaladas de funk latino ("Aquarius/Let The Sun Shine In"). Desafortunadamente, estos discos no lograron conectar con una juventud que, en ese momento, estaba enamorada del rock 'n roll. A comienzos de los '70, Celia estaba seriamente necesitada de un proyecto comercial. Milagrosamente, se ubicó en el centro del movimiento musical más importante de la música afrocaribeña - la explosión salsera de la Fania. Inaugurada en 1964 por el empresario Jerry Masucci y el flautista y director de orquesta dominicano Johnny Pacheco, Fania juntó a los músicos más talentosos del momento bajo el mismo techo, conectando la fiebre de los ritmos afrocubanos con el swing del jazz estadounidense y la influencia urbana del r&b. Hasta el día de hoy, el catálogo de la Fania es considerado como el punto culminante de la música tropical, el estandarte con el cual se comparan todos los esfuerzos posteriores del género. Es innegable la pasión de las grabaciones más tempranas y tradicionales de la música afrocubana. Pero los mejores momentos de artistas como Pacheco, Rubén Blades, Willie Colón, Héctor Lavoe, Eddie Palmieri y la Fania All Stars elevaron al género a un nivel inusitado, agregándole un toque modernista, comentario social y un apetito feroz por los sonidos exóticos. Fue uno de los músicos más respetados de la disquera, el tecladista, director de orquesta y fanático de la música cubana Larry Harlow, que invitó a Celia a participar en su ópera latina de 1973, Hommy. Interpretó el éxito "Gracia Divina", presentándose a una nueva generación de melómanos. El mismo año, una extensa versión del clásico "Bemba Colorá" grabada en concierto en el Yankee Stadium (incluida en el segundo volúmen del LP doble Live At Yankee Stadium) hizo historia. Celia Cruz se había convertido en la indiscutible reina de la salsa. En 1974, Pacheco, cuya orquesta modernizó las texturas de conjunto cubano de La Matancera con arreglos más dinámicos, invitó a Celia a que grabaran juntos. El resultado, Celia & Johnny, fue un impresionante triunfo artístico que elevó a la cantante a un nivel de estrellato que no había conocido ni siquiera con La Matancera. En las manos de Pacheco, Celia brilló como una estrella fugaz. Tan sólo el tema de apertura, el volcánico "Químbara", valía el precio del disco – claro indicio del poder casi sobrenatural de la voz de Celia. No es casualidad que "Químbara" le dé comienzo a la segunda parte de esta antología. Actuando con inteligencia, la Fania trató a Celia con la importancia que se merecía. Durante los años siguientes, grabó una serie de discos superlativos con los artistas más prestigiosos de la disquera: Pacheco, por supuesto, pero también Willie Colón, Papo Lucca (el pianista virtuoso de La Sonora Ponceña) y Ray Barretto (en 1988, su colaboración Ritmo En El Corazón le concedió a Celia su primer premio Grammy). Bajo la dirección artística de Colón, exploró los ritmos del Brasil con excelenctes versiones de temas de samba y bossa nova como "Usted Abusó" y "Berimbau". "Cuando empecé a trabajar con Celia, ella era una cantante establecida", recuerda Willie. "Para mí, fue como una graduación a las grandes ligas. Curiosamente, fue mucho más fácil trabajar con ella que con algunas de las divas de mi generación. Celia siempre estaba dispuesta a escuchar nuevas ideas, aunque éstas parecieran tontas. Sabía que la música no es una ciencia exacta. En parte, yo creo que ésa fue la clave de su longevidad artística". Como integrante de la Fania All Stars, Celia participó en recitales en compañía de salseros de su calibre, como Héctor Lavoe y Cheo Feliciano. Con Pacheco como director musical, la orquesta viajó al Africa, donde Celia fue recibida como una diosa e interpretó versiones inolvidables de "Químbara" y "Guantanamera". La carrera de Celia sobrevivió intacta el declive de la Fania a fines de los '80. Para ese entonces, los aficionados de la salsa en todo el mundo habían desarrollado un interés apasionado por su música. Celia no tuvo problemas para conseguir un contrato discográfico con RMM Records, la compañía de Nueva York que dominó la salsa durante los años '90, y se trasladó a Sony para grabar tres exitosos discos (uno de los cuales salió al mercado en 2003, después de su muerte). Al final de su carrera, Celia grabó éxitos inmensos como "Que Le Den Candela", "La Vida Es Un Carnaval" y "La Negra Tiene Tumbao". "Recuerdo cuando fuimos juntos al Africa", me contó Johnny Pacheco recientemente, desde su casa en Nueva York. "El presidente del país envió dos limusinas al aeropuerto – una para mí, y la otra para Celia. En un momento, ella me dijo: 'Estamos aquí gracias a ti, Johnny', y eso me hizo sentir muy bien. Le pedí que cantara 'Guantanamera' y la gente se volvió loca". Pacheco suena melancólico al recordar a esta diva inolvidable. "La voz de esa mujer", susurra. "Era increíble. Algo de otro mundo". Escrito por Ernesto Lechner