s

Willie Colon & Hector Lavoe

Asalto Navideno Deluxe Edition

$1.29

Willie Colon & Hector Lavoe

Asalto Navideno Deluxe Edition

$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
Introduccion
Canto A Borinquen
Popurri Navideno
Traigo La Salsa
Aires De Navidad
La Murga
Esta Navidad
Vive Tu Vida Contento
Pescao (Potpourri Sambao) / Si Se Quema El Monte / Coje El Pandero / Pescao (Samba)
Recomendacion
La Banda
Dona Santos
Cantemos
Pa Los Pueblos
Arbolito
Tranquilidad

The greatest Tropical Christmas album set ever is now being released for the 2011 season. It’s packaged in a digipack with both volumes of the evergreen classic and original booklets. With Christmas just a few weeks away, it's time to focus on the amazing selection of Holiday albums that were produced during the apex of the salsa era. From Ismael Rivera and Cheo Feliciano to the venerable El Gran Combo, many legendary artists celebrated the traditions of Puerto Rican Christmas through their own albums. The best one of the bunch, however, is Asalto Navideño, created in the early '70s by salsa's dynamic duo, Héctor Lavoe and Willie Colón. Asalto is one of the most soulful albums ever made by Lavoe and Colón - and it includes the hit single "La Murga," a staple across Latin American dancefloors. Part of the album's success can be credited to the presence of cuatro master Yomo Toro, who permeates the recording with the roots of authentic boricua folk. A mandatory addition to any comprehensive collection of tropical music, Asalto Navideño is now available as a  digital download. My abuela taught me to respect and appreciate the jíbaro (Puerto Rican peasant) & most things Puerto Rican. The '50s were an exciting time for Latinos in New York. As a little boy, I loved listening to the old timers sitting on milk crates in front of David’s (Daví) Bodega singing décimas and aguinaldos. It gave me a sense of pride to watch them as they eloquently challenged each other in verse. I loved the fancy words, the quick wit. I wished I could express myself like that. El Ciego (The Blind Man) is the champ of the block. He will take anyone, as Daví keeps the beers coming. It's the heyday of dance music. The Palladium is rocking. There are many exciting dance halls in the Bronx where you can go all decked out and dance the night away. It's the magic of New York. The New York Puerto Ricans (Nuyoricans) dance generation finds the old guitar and cuatro music boring. They mock it, calling it “guilinguín guilinguín” music. There is a separation between the Puerto Rican jíbaros who are into this highly lyrical folkloric music, and the new generation of Nuyorican who barely understand Spanish and who express their Latin identity through their bodies in dance. The name jíbaro has the connotation of a “hick” or “hillbilly.” Being raised by an old school jíbara placed me smack in the middle of this phenomenon. The jíbaros and their cuatros squatting by the bodega next door to my building, and the rumberos playing their congas in the vacant lots and the schoolyard up the block. This is the cultural foundation upon which my life and my career were built. It's the late 50’s. My mom works at a lingerie shop on 149th street, near Brook Avenue. I walk up to the store after school. It is over a mile away, going through many different turfs. Along St. Mary’s Park, I turn left at the pet shop on the corner of St. Anne’s and 149th. I always stop to look at the animals there before continuing to Maury’s Lingerie. While I'm visiting my mom, a customer walks into the shop. I step outside for a while; after all, buying underwear is a personal kind of thing. While waiting, I walk a couple of storefronts toward the middle of the block and look into the window of La Campana Bar. I can hear a group playing inside; it’s one of those “guilinguín guilinguín” trios. The sign on the window reads “Friday Nights: Yomo Toro.” I try to peek in, but someone pulls me away so that I won’t see the go-go girls. By the '60s, with the Vietnam war and civil rights movement in the forefront, the baby boomer rumberos have all but taken over the block. At night, the rumberos put their drums away and go dancing, or listen to the Symphony Sid or Dick Ricardo Sugar radio shows on the stoop. The jam sessions in the schoolyards and parks are more developed now. They are well attended, with all kinds of amateur musicians showing up to play, including myself. I’m around 12 years old. Most of the conga drummers are Puerto Rican. Papín is Cuban and brings a full bass. Fernando is Dominican. He brings his violin. Tijoe is African American; he and I play the trumpet. Guaguancó, bomba, plena. The music represents our spirit and identity. Most of the older guys are gone. Drafted to Vietnam or in jail, mostly for drugs, or dead from one of the two. As the American Apartheid is in its death throes, we watch Martin Luther King marching through Selma on black and white TV. While hostile racist police (minimum height: 6.5’) sweeps our jam sessions for “Illegal Assembly” or “Disturbing the Peace,” we feel part of the movement. We return the following day if the weather and conditions are right. This is our little piece of civil disobedience, in solidarity with the cause. It’s 1971. Héctor Lavoe and I have a string of hits off our first six albums. The jíbaro qualities of Héctor inspires me to try a crazy experiment. I visit Fania president and owner Jerry Masucci, who now believes I have the Midas touch, to pitch him a Christmas Record. I start explaining that it will be a traditional jíbaro Christmas record, when Jerry interrupts me. "Yeah, yeah yeah," he says. "Just bring me the record. I don’t need to know anything." I am ecstatic and start preproduction work on Asalto Navideño. Asalto (assault) was the perfect word, since we were already embracing a comical gangsta image. The asalto is a Puerto Rican Christmas tradition that involves being assaulted by a group of carolers. If you don’t have anything to offer, the carolers sing insults to the homeowners for being so stingy. I “move up” into Woodlawn, the Irish area of the Bronx. Across the street from my apartment are two vacant storefronts. I rent them and unite them into one, bringing in a grand piano, soundproofing and upgrading the space into a rehearsal studio. Marty Sheller lives in Co-op City nearby, and our first project at the studio is Asalto. Marty helps me orchestrate the sketches I wrote for the "Popurrí" (a medley of aguinaldos), “Esta Navidad” and “La Murga.” Héctor helps me finish the lyrics. He acts as my jíbaro connection. I ask him to find some original jíbaro songs, and he brings “Aires De Navidad” by Robertito García, “Vive Tu Vida Contento” and “Canto A Borinquen” both by "Ramito" Flor Morales Ramos. The arrangements are ready, and it's now time to conduct our first full rehearsal. I call the guys: Milton, Mangual, Professor Joe, Santi, Willie Campbell, Roberto García, Louie Romero. We rehearse late into the night. In the morning, I return and see that the storefront has been wrecked. Must be the gentlemen from the pub around the corner. I call Mikey from the old block, he works in construction. I have him build a brick front with two bulletproof windows. Now that the problems is solved, we can go on with the album. We are finally ready to book the recording studio. I’m listening to Polito Vega’s radio show and he’s doing call-ins. You can sing any song over the phone and Polito has Yomo Toro with him to accompany the callers on the cuatro. I ask Héctor if he knows Yomo. He said Robertito knows him well. We invite Yomo to the recording session. Word gets out about this crazy idea, and even Polito shows up to the session. It’s like a party. The band is well rehearsed, fired up, ready to make some music. Yomo shows up, and Pacheco is beginning to grasp what’s going on. He asks Yomo: "What are you doing here? Are you recording with Ramito?” Yomo locks with the band as if he had been playing with us for years. Everybody feels the vibe. Polito is excited and wants to get into the act. We ask him to MC the intro to the record while we play a seis chorreao and Yomo strums. Polito slams it out of the park with his improvisations. We all felt that it was something new. But it turned out to be way more than that. Yomo became part of the Fania All Stars and a salsa favorite. Asalto Navideño has been one of the bestselling albums in its field. “La Murga” became an international standard and one of the most recorded and sampled songs to this day. Personally, Asalto Navideño allowed me to reconcile both the jíbaro and the rumbero in me. Written by Willie Colón Ahora que faltan sólo unas semanas para las fiestas de fin de año, es hora de recordar la impresionante selección de discos navideños que salieron durante el apogeo de la salsa. Desde Ismael Rivera y Cheo Feliciano hasta el venerable Gran Combo, muchos artistas celebraron las tradiciones de la Navidad en Puerto Rico con sus discos. Pero el mejor de todos es Asalto Navideño, grabado a principios de los '70 por el dúo dinámico de la salsa, Héctor Lavoe y Willie Colón. Asalto salsifica una selección estelar de canciones navideñas. Canta sobre las tradiciones boricuas con una mezcla de nostalgia y orgullo. Es uno de los discos más sentidos de la obra de Lavoe y Colón - incluyendo además el éxito "La Murga", escuchado hasta el día de hoy en pistas de baile a través de toda Latinoamérica. Parte del éxito del disco se debe a la presencia de Yomo Toro, maestro del cuatro, que empapa la grabación con las raíces del auténtico folklore boricua. Una adición indispensable a toda colección de música tropical, este disco doble, Asalto Navideño está disponible en formato de descarga digital. Mi abuela me enseñó a respetar y apreciar al jíbaro y a todo lo puertorriqueño. La década del '50 fue una era emocionante para los latinos en Nueva York. Cuando era niño, me encantaba escuchar a los veteranos sentados sobre bidones de leche delante de la Bodega de Daví, cantando décimas y aguinaldos. Sentía orgullo al verlos desafiarse el uno al otro con sus versos. Me encantaban las palabras complicadas, la rapidez de su ingenio. Quería poder expresarme de esa manera. El Ciego es el campeón de la cuadra. Puede desafiar a cualquiera, con tal que Daví siga sirviendo cervezas. Es el apogeo de la música bailable. El Palladium está que arde. En el Bronx hay muchos lugares bailables, donde se puede ir bien vestido y bailar durante toda la noche. Es la magia de Nueva York. Para la generación nuyorican de bailadores, la vieja música para guitarra y cuatro es aburrida. Se burlan de ella, llamándola guilinguín guilinguín. Existe una separación entre los jíbaros boricuas que aprecian esta música folklórica tan lírica, y la nueva generación de puertorriqueños de Nueva York que apenas hablan español y expresan su identidad latina a través de sus cuerpos, en la pista de baile. El nombre jíbaro tiene una connotación despectiva. Habiendo sido criado por una jíbara de la vieja escuela, yo me encontraba justo en el medio de este fenómeno. Los jíbaros y sus cuatros en la bodega que estaba al lado de mi edificio, y los rumberos tocando sus congas en los terrenos baldíos y el patio de la escuela. Son los cimientos culturales en los que se basaron mi vida y mi carrera. Estamos a finales de los '50. Mi madre trabaja en una lencería ubicada en la calle 149, cerca de la avenida Brook. Después de la escuela, voy caminando a la tienda. Es más de una milla, recorriendo una variedad de vecindarios. Caminando por St. Mary’s Park, hago una izquierda en la tienda de mascotas en la esquina de St. Anne y la 149. Siempre me detengo para ver los animalitos antes de llegar a Maury’s Lingerie. Mientras visito a mi mamá, un cliente entra en la tienda. Salgo a la calle por un rato; después de todo, comprar ropa interior es algo bastante íntimo. Mientras espero, camino hasta la mitad de la cuadra y miro en la ventana del bar La Campana. Hay un grupo tocando adentro; uno de esos tríos guilinguín guilinguín. Hay un cartel que dice: “Viernes por la Noche: Yomo Toro”. Trato de mirar, pero alguien me aleja de allí, para que no vea a las coristas. Durante los años '60, marcados por la guerra de Vietnam y el movimiento de los derechos civiles, los rumberos se han apoderado de la cuadra. A la noche, guardan sus tambores y salen a bailar, o escuchan los programas radiales de Symphony Sid o Dick Ricardo Sugar. Las descargas en las escuelas y los parques han crecido. Hay mucha gente, y todo tipo de músicos aficionados que vienen a tocar, incluyéndome a mí. Tengo unos 12 años. La mayoría de los congueros son puertorriqueños. Papín es cubano y trae su bajo. Fernando es dominicano y toca el violín. Tijoe es afroamericano; él y yo tocamos la trompeta. Guaguancó, bomba, plena. La música representa nuestro espíritu e identidad. Casi todos los mayores se han ido. Fueron llevados a Vietnam, o están en la cárcel, principalmente por drogas - o murieron por uno de los dos. Mientras el apartheid estadounidense está en sus últimos estertores, miramos a Martin Luther King caminando por Selma en la televisión en blanco y negro. La policía, blanca y racista (altura mínima: 6 pies con 5) clausura nuestras descargas bajo los cargos de "reunión ilegal" o por "perturbar la paz". Sentimos que somos parte del movimiento. Regresamos al día siguiente si el clima y las condiciones lo permiten. Una pizca de desobediencia civil, en solidaridad con la causa. Es 1971. Héctor Lavoe y yo tenemos una serie de éxitos en nuestros primeros seis discos. Las cualidades de jíbaro de Héctor me inspiran a intentar un experimento loco. Visito a Jerry Masucci, presidente y dueño de la Fania, que ahora cree que tengo el toque del rey Midas, para proponerle un disco navideño. Empiezo a explicarle que será un disco de navidad jíbaro, cuando Jerry me interrumpe. "Yeah, yeah yeah", me dice. "Tráeme el disco. No necesito saber nada más". Yo estoy feliz, y comienzo la preproducción de Asalto Navideño. Asalto era una palabra perfecta para nosotros, que habíamos adoptado una imagen cómica de malandrines. El asalto es una tradición puertorriqueña en la que los cantantes de villancicos van de visita a las casas. Si el dueño no tiene nada para ofrecerles, los asaltantes le cantan insultos por ser tan tacaño. Me mudo a Woodlawn, la zona irlandesa del Bronx. En el lado opuesto de mi departamento hay dos tiendas vacías. Las alquilo y las unifico. Traigo un piano y preparo el espacio a prueba de sonido, transformándolo en una sala de ensayos. Marty Sheller vive cerca, en Co-op City, y Asalto es nuestro primer proyecto juntos. Marty me ayudar a orquestar los bosquejos que escribí para "Popurrí" (una selección de aguinaldos), “Esta Navidad” y “La Murga”. Héctor me ayuda a terminar las letras. El es mi conexión con el mundo jíbaro. Le pido que encuentre algunas canciones originales, y me trae “Aires De Navidad” de Robertito García, “Vive Tu Vida Contento” y “Canto A Borinquen”, ambas de "Ramito" Flor Morales Ramos. Los arreglos están listos, y ahora hay que llevar a cabo nuestro primer ensayo formal. Llamo a los muchachos: Milton, Mangual, el profesor Joe, Santi, Willie Campbell, Roberto García, Louie Romero. Ensayamos durante toda la noche. Cuando vuelvo a la mañana, veo que la fachada del lugar está destrozada. Seguramente fueron los caballeros del bar de la esquina. Llamo a Mikey del viejo barrio, trabaja en construcción. Lo contrato para que construya una pared de ladrillos con dos ventanas a prueba de bala. Habiendo resuelto ese problema, podemos seguir con el disco. Finalmente, estamos listos para reservar el estudio de grabación. Escucho el programa radial de Polito Vega, que está tomando llamadas. Uno puede cantar lo que quiera por teléfono, y Polito tiene a Yomo Toro con el cuatro para acompañar a los que llaman. Le pregunto a Héctor si conoce a Yomo. Dice que Robertito lo conoce bien. Invitamos a Yomo a la grabación. La gente se entera de esta idea loca, y hasta Polito viene a la sesión. Parece una fiesta. El grupo está bien ensayado, encendido, listo para crear. Aparece Yomo, y Pacheco empieza a entender todo lo que está pasando. Le pregunta: "¿Qué haces aquí? ¿Viniste a grabar con Ramito? Yomo se fusiona con la banda como si hubiera tocado con nosotros por años. Todos sienten la buena vibra. Polito está emocionado y quiere participar. Le pedimos que narre la introducción, mientras tocamos un seis chorreao con Yomo. Polito hace un trabajo impresionante con sus improvisaciones. En ese momento, sentimos que estábamos creando algo nuevo. Pero fue mucho más que eso. Yomo se convirtió en integrante de la Fania All Stars, y un favorito de la salsa. Asalto Navideño ha sido uno de los discos más vendidos en su género. “La Murga” es un clásico internacional, y uno de los temas más grabados y sampleados de la música tropical. A un nivel personal, Asalto Navideño me permitió reconciliar al jíbaro y el rumbero que viven dentro de mi. Escrito por Willie Colón