s

Chamaco Ramirez

Alive and Kicking

$1.50

Chamaco Ramirez

Alive and Kicking

$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
$9.99 Album
San Agustin
Rumba Moderna
Cuando Manda El Corazón
Adivinalo
Así Son Bongo
Kikiriki
Respetala
No Es Vacilón
Fania

Born in 1941 in Santurce, Puerto Rico, Ramón Luis Ramírez Toro, a.k.a “Chamaco” (‘kid’) Ramírez, is a somewhat obscure sonero today. However, among hardcore fans he is known for his signature composition “Trucutú” and his interpretation of Curet Alonso’s “Plante Bandera.” If Ramírez had never done anything else, his recordings in the 1960s and 70s with Tommy Olivencia alone should have been enough to cause him to be held in the highest esteem. They are some of the best salsa tunes ever put to wax. Yet his tragically short solo career, occasional stints in jail, penchant for crime to support his drug habit, and momentary disappearances from the scene (ending in his untimely death in 1983), have contributed to his remaining largely unrecognized in the pantheon of salsa greats. Like Héctor Lavoe and Lalo Rodríguez, Chamaco Ramírez had that incredible high-pitched nasal voice that could send chills up the spine. Like Ismael Rivera, Chamaco had a way with improvising lyrics, word play, and rhythmic delivery. Like José “Cheo” Feliciano, Ramírez painted portraits of people in the barrio because he was “of the street” himself. And as with all of these more famous Boricuas, Chamaco had trouble with drugs, and in the end, that’s what did him in. Yet unlike them, he did not really get the proper recognition due to someone with his caliber of talent. In a recent interview, Cuban pianist, composer, and arranger Javier Vázquez related that he was in the middle of working on Ismael Rivera’s next album (later released in 1980 as Maelo – El Sonero Mayor) in December of 1978 when sessions had to be halted due to Rivera’s difficulty singing because of painful polyps on his throat. Vázquez had been the musical director and arranger for Rivera’s backing band Los Cachimbos since the early 70s. Fania label boss Jerry Masucci called Javier up with a solution for replacing Rivera, which was to bring in Chamaco because of similarities between the two singers. In fact, the two men were good friends and Ramírez looked up to Maelo as a mentor. According to Chamaco’s sister, Rivera and Ramírez had become close in Puerto Rico’s notorious Oso Blanco prison years earlier, forming a vocal group together while behind bars. It was hoped a recording session could fill in the gap in Fania’s Ismael Rivera catalog. However, rather than sing over the already completed music tracks from the aborted Maelo date, a whole new project was launched instead, the result being that Vázquez ended up producing from start to finish, hand-picking a band, setting up the studio dates, and arranging Ramírez’ first—and last—solo album, Alive And Kicking (1979). Chamaco’s most recent studio recording had been with bandleader Olivencia in the mid-70s. Some time after, he had slipped off to Chicago, and that is where Masucci tracked him down. Ramírez returned to New York, and over dinner the singer and the producer planned out the album, with Chamaco selecting the songs. All of the musicians and coro vocalists on the sessions were people Vázquez had worked with in the past. Just to keep it fresh, the sound of the band that Vázquez put together was somewhere between the smaller conjunto style of Los Cachimbos and Olivencia’s larger big band orchestra. Unlike the Cachimbos, there would be no tres and the horns would be augmented by a second trumpet (the uncredited Ramón “Chiripa” Aracena) and an additional reed, Mario Rivera (tenor sax). According to Vázquez, Chamaco was enthusiastic, easy to work with, and came to the sessions completely sober. Vázquez mentions that after the album’s release, the two were never able to perform together live to support it, as he was too busy with other gigs and Chamaco was “not doing dances.” Sadly, the chemistry that had worked so well in the studio was not to be repeated on the stage. Javier never saw Chamaco again after the sessions were over. For the haunting cover, designer Ron Levine depicted a smiling Ramírez climbing out of a coffin in a crypt, illuminated by a ray of sunlight, which he says was inspired by the title that was given to him during production. The illustration was his idea and done in a spirit of fun. He did not know of Ramírez’s personal issues. For those who did know him well, it seemed the singer, who liked to tempt fate, was moving on a downward trajectory that would end badly. Yet no one knew how chillingly prophetic that depiction would be several years later when Ramírez ended up being murdered in an alleyway in the Bronx. It has been suggested by music producer Chris Soto that Chamaco’s vocal talent, freewheeling life, and violent death have certain similarities with several figures in rap, especially Biggie Smalls (Christopher Wallace) a.k.a. The Notorious B.I.G. This is particularly true as far as their final albums being an ironic commentary on their untimely demise (Biggie’s posthumous opus was titled Life After Death). Seen in a more positive light, Levine’s cover makes the point that a performer never dies as long as the music lives on. The album opens with Curet Alonso’s “San Agustin,” an estampa (vignette) in the son montuno rhythm that salutes the colorful people of the barrio in the Puerta de Tierra section of San Juan, especially a bongo player, a bar owner, and a boxer. Picking up the pace, next is an update of “Rumba Moderna,” first made famous by Alberto Ruiz and Conjunto Kubavana in 1948. Chamaco changes the lyrics a bit to state that the inspiration for his “salsa moderna” comes from New York. “Cuando Manda El Corazón” urges one to follow the heart’s orders. What is most effective here is not so much the lyrics as it is the emotion with which Ramírez interprets the song. “Adivinalo” is a somewhat controversial party-oriented number penned by Chamaco. It’s a playful childish riddle (in slang terminology) about drug use at a house party. Be that as it may, it’s got an infectious swing. “Asi Son Bongo” is the most heavy duty dance track on the record. The song was composed years before by Joseíto Fernández of “Guajira Guantanamera” fame, but Chamaco makes it his own. The lyrics complain of a lover who has forgotten the protagonist once he is undeservedly thrown in jail, despite her promise to visit him on Sundays and to take him back when he gets out. Only his mother comes to visit him in that “damned prison” that is like a cemetery for him. “Kikiriki” uses the metaphor of cock-fighting, a blood sport beloved in Latin countries, to comment on Chamaco’s own sense of manhood. Ramírez then brings his soulful and suffering side sharply into focus with the torrid bolero “Respetala.” He implores his lover to scold him because he deserves it for being untrue to her, for being a Hell-raiser; he does not merit her forgiveness because he disrespected her honor. As in the best tradition of over-wrought bolero lyrics, he begs her to beat him, even kill him, if she wants, but to never leave him without her love. Back to the upbeat salsa with another self-penned number that describes a humorous vignette of a drunken bus driver. Chamaco’s playful rhyming and Vázquez’s happy piano conspire to keep things going in a party atmosphere. The album ends with a classic 1920s son montuno from Cuba, the Reinaldo Bolaños composition “Fanía Funché,” made famous by Conjunto Estrellas de Chocolate and covered by Johnny Pacheco on his 1964 album Cañonazo, the debut release from the label named for the song. Though the song’s lyrics contain many intriguing African words and so may elude a complete analysis, the basic gist seems to be an appeal to African deities for help in times of trouble. Those nine tracks are Chamaco’s last will and testament, a diamond in the dirt to remember him by. This reissue will hopefully set the record straight and prove that Chamaco’s legacy is still Alive And Kicking.Ramón Luis Ramírez Toro, alias “Chamaco” Ramírez, nació en 1941 en Santurce, Puerto Rico, y fue un sonero un tanto desconocido. Sin embargo, sus fanáticos devotos lo conocen como “Trucutú”, su composición más popular, y por su interpretación de “Plante Bandera” de Curet Alonso. Aunque Ramírez no hubiese hecho más nada, sus grabaciones en las décadas de los 60 y 70 con Tommy Olivencia bastarían para tenerlo en muy alta estima. Son algunas de las mejores salsas que jamás se hayan puesto en vinilo. Pero su corta y trágica carrera como solista, encarcelaciones ocasionales, su inclinación hacia la delincuencia para mantener su hábito de drogas, y sus momentáneas desapariciones (culminando con su muerte prematura en 1983), han contribuido a su anonimato en el panteón de los grandes de la salsa. Al igual que Héctor Lavoe y Lalo Rodríguez, Chamaco Ramírez poseía una voz aguda y nasal que podía causar escalofríos. Al igual que Ismael Rivera, Chamaco tenía una gran habilidad para improvisar letras, para jugar con las palabras, y un poseía gran sentido rítmico. Al igual que José “Cheo” Feliciano, Ramírez pintaba retratos de la gente del barrio porque él era tan “callejero” como ellos. Y al igual que todos estos boricuas que eran más famosos que él, Chamaco tuvo problemas causados por las drogas, y al final fueron éstas las que lo acabaron. Pero a diferencia de ellos, él nunca obtuvo el reconocimiento digno de alguien con talento de ese calibre. En una entrevista reciente, el pianista, compositor, y arreglista cubano Javier Vázquez contó que estaba en pleno trabajo en el próximo álbum de Ismael Rivera (lanzado más adelante en 1980 como Maelo – El Sonero Mayor) en 1978 cuando las sesiones tuvieron que ser suspendidas ya que Rivera no podía cantar porque tenía dolorosos pólipos en la garganta. Vázquez había sido el director musical y el arreglista de Los Cachimbos, la banda que acompañaba a Rivera, desde principios de los 70. El jefe del sello Fania, Jerry Masucci, llamó a Javier con la solución para remplazar a Rivera: traer a Chamaco, ya que ambos cantantes eran tan similares. De hecho, ellos eran buenos amigos y Ramírez admiraba a Maelo como un mentor. Según la hermana de Chamaco, Rivera y Ramírez habían hecho amistad años atrás en la notoria cárcel de Puerto Rico, el Oso Blanco, formando un grupo vocal mientras estaban tras las rejas. Se esperaba que una sesión pudiese llenar el vacío en el catálogo de Fania de Ismael Rivera. Sin embargo, en vez de cantar sobre las pistas musicales ya terminadas en el proyecto de Maelo, un proyecto totalmente nuevo fue lanzado en su lugar. Vázquez terminó produciéndolo de principio a fin, seleccionando la orquesta personalmente, determinando las fechas en que se utilizaría el estudio, y arreglando el primer – y último – álbum como solista de Ramírez, Alive and Kicking (1979). Chamaco había realizado su última grabación con el director de orquesta Olivencia a mediados de los 70. Se fue a Chicago poco después y fue ahí donde Masucci lo encontró. Ramírez regresó a Nueva York, y durante el transcurso de una cena el cantante y el productor planearon el álbum con Camacho a cargo de la selección de las canciones. Todos los músicos y los cantantes del coro en las sesiones eran gente con quienes Vázquez había trabajado anteriormente. Para mantener el sonido fresco, el estilo de la banda que Vázquez reunió era una mezcla del estilo del conjunto pequeño Los Cachimbos y el de la gran orquesta de Olivencia. A diferencia de Los Cachimbos, no había un tres, y los vientos incluían una segunda trompeta (Ramón “Chiripa” Aracena, quien no fue acreditado) y una caña adicional, Mario Rivera (saxofón tenor). Según Vázquez, Chamaco estaba entusiasmado, resultaba fácil trabajar con él, y llegaba a las sesiones completamente sobrio. Vázquez menciona que después del lanzamiento del álbum no pudieron presentarse juntos en vivo para promoverlo ya que él estaba muy ocupado con otras presentaciones y Chamaco no “iba a presentarse en bailes”. Lamentablemente, la química que tan bien había trabajado en el estudio no se duplicaría en el escenario. Javier nunca volvió a ver a Chamaco una vez terminaron las sesiones. En la inquietante portada del álbum, el diseñador Ron Levine representó a un sonriente Ramírez saliendo de un ataúd en una cripta iluminada por un rayo de luz, y dice que fue inspirado por el título que le mostraron durante la producción. La ilustración fue idea suya y fue realizada con carácter divertido. No conocía los problemas personales de Ramírez. Aquellos quienes sí le conocían bien pensaban que el cantante, a quien le gustaba tentar al destino, estaba encaminándose en una trayectoria descendente que terminaría mal. Pero nadie imaginó cuán escalofriantemente profética resultaría esa representación años después cuando Ramírez terminó asesinado en un callejón del Bronx. El productor musical Chris Soto opina que el talento vocal de Chamaco, su vida despreocupada y su muerte violenta tienen similitudes a las de varias figuras del rap, especialmente Biggie Smalls (Christopher Wallace), alias The Notorious B.I.G. Este es el caso cuando se trata de los últimos álbumes de ambos, que fueron irónicos comentarios sobre sus muertes prematuras (el Opus póstumo de Biggie se titula Life After Death). Si se quiere mirar de manera más positiva, la portada de Levine sugiere que el artista nunca muere mientras su música se mantenga viva. El álbum abre con “San Agustín” de Curet Alonso, una estampa al ritmo del son montuno que rinde homenaje al colorido pueblo del barrio en la sección de Puerta de Tierra en San Juan, especialmente a un bongosero, a un dueño de barra, y a un boxeador. Apurando el paso le sigue una nueva versión de “Rumba Moderna”, hecha famosa inicialmente por Alberto Ruiz y el Conjunto Kubavana en 1948. Chamaco le cambia la letra un poco para afirmar que la inspiración para esta “salsa moderna” proviene de Nueva York. “Cuando Manda El Corazón” insta a que se obedezcan las órdenes del corazón. Lo más efectivo aquí no es tanto la letra como la emoción con la que Ramírez interpreta la canción. “Adivínalo” es un número fiestero algo controversial escrito por Chamaco. Es un juguetón acertijo infantil (en terminología común) sobre el uso de drogas en una fiesta casera. Sea lo que sea, tiene un ritmo contagioso. “Así Son Bongo” es la pista bailable más sólida del álbum. La canción fue compuesta años atrás por Joseíto Fernández, famoso por su “Guajira Guantanamera”, pero Chamaco la convierte en suya. La letra es una queja sobre una amante que olvida al protagonista cuando lo encarcelan injustamente, a pesar de su promesa de visitarlo los domingos y de volver con él cuando salga. Sólo su madre lo visita en esa “maldita prisión” que es como un cementerio para él. “Kikirikí” emplea la metáfora de las peleas de gallos, un deporte sangriento adorado en los países latinos, para hacer un comentario sobre el propio sentido de virilidad de Chamaco. Entonces Ramírez enfoca en su lado sentimental y sufrido con el tórrido bolero “Respétala”. Le implora a su amante a que lo regañe porque se lo merece, porque le ha sido infiel y por ser un atorrante; no merece su perdón porque le ha faltado el respeto a su honor. Siguiendo la mejor tradición de boleros con letras exageradamente labradas, le ruega que le pegue y hasta que lo mate si quiere, pero que nunca lo deje sin su amor. Y entonces volvemos a otra salsa movida con otro número original que describe una estampa sobre un borracho conductor de autobús. La rima divertida de Chamaco y el piano alegre de Vázquez conspiran para mantener la cosa andando en un ambiente de fiesta. El álbum termina con un clásico son montuno de Cuba de los años 20, la composición de Reinlado Bolaños “Fanía Funché”. Esta fue popularizada por el Conjunto Estrellas de Chocolate, y fue cubierta por Johnny Pacheco en 1964 en su álbum Cañonazo, el primer lanzamiento del sello que deriva su nombre de la canción. Aunque la canción contiene intrigantes palabras africanas que pudieran llevar a un análisis completo sobre ellas, la esencia básica consiste de un pedido de ayuda a las deidades africanas en tiempos difíciles. Esas nueve pistas son la última voluntad y el testamento de Chamaco, un diamante en la tierra con el cual se le puede recordar. Esperamos que esta reedición sirva para aclarar los hechos y probar que el legado de Chamaco sigue Alive And Kicking [“vivito y coleando”].