s

Ray Barretto

A Man And His Music - Que Viva La Musica

$1.50

Ray Barretto

A Man And His Music - Que Viva La Musica

$19.99 Album
$19.99 Album
$19.99 Album
El Watusi
El Bantu
007
Do You Dig It
Soul Drummers
Hard Hands
Together
Right On
Acid
Abidjan
Power
The Other Road
Lucretia The Cat
Cocinando
Arrepientete
Que Viva La Musica
La Pelota
Indestructible
El Hijo De Obatala
Guarare
Vale Mas Un Guaguanco
Ya Vez
Tu Propio Dolor
Fuerza Gigante (Giant Force)
Rhythm Of Life
Manos Duras
Prestame Tu Mujer
Aguadilla
Raymond Barretto Pagan was born to Puerto Rican parents in New York on April 29, 1929. When he was barely four years old, his father decided to leave home and return to Puerto Rico. His mother settled in the South Bronx and raised her three children by herself. From an early age, Barretto was influenced by two styles of music: Latin and Jazz. During the day, his mother listened to the music of Daniel Santos, Bobby Capó, and the Los Panchos Trio. However, as Ray grew up, he fell in love with Machito Grillo, Marcelino Guerra, Arsenio Rodríguez, and the Jazz orchestra greats he heard on the radio; stars like Benny Goodman and Duke Ellington. When he turned 17, Barretto enlisted in the United States Army and was sent off to World War II. While stationed in Germany, he heard the song that changed his life: “Manteca” by Chano Pozo and the Dizzy Gillespie band. When he left the army, Barretto returned to New York and, influenced by the percussion instruments that his idol Chano Pozo dominated, he bought a bongo. But he wasn’t satisfied with the sound, so he went out and spent 50 dollars on some tumbadors he saw for sale in a local neighborhood bakery. And that’s how he took his first steps onto the nightclub music scene. His first recording was in 1953, with Eddie Bonnemere’s Latin Jazz group at the Red Garter lounge in New York. In contrast to famous conga players of the time like Cándido Camero, Mongo Santamaría, and Patato Valdés –who started out with Afro-Caribbean rhythms and worked their their way up to Jazz– Barretto started out in the world of Jazz; it would be years before he would make a foray into other Latin rhythms. On one occasion, percussionist Monchito Muñoz invited Barretto to an audition with the José Curbelo Orchestra. He stayed for four years. This experience helped him develop his talent for Latin dance music. He worked with the group on the album “Wine, Woman y Cha Cha Cha” in 1955. At the same time, his knowledge of Jazz allowed him to work with various bands of the time, such as Max Roach, Charlie Parker, Art Blakey, Herbie Man, Dizzy Gillespie and Cal Tjader. In late 1961, the opportunity presented itself to record an album with Riverside Records, owned by Orrin Keepnevo, who was trying to build a catalogue of Latin music. It was Keepnevo who suggested Barretto form a band to record with. Thus was born La Charanga Moderna. With La Charanga Moderna, Barretto altered the instrumental format of traditional charangas in a radical move by incorporating trumpet and trombone. In 1962, he made his presence on the music scene known with the album “Pachanga with Barretto.” On the heels of this album’s success came “Latino” in 1963. He then joined Tico Records, where he recorded the album “Charanga Moderna,” which produced the hit “El Watusi.” This number was the midas touch; his first album went gold, selling more than a million copies. It also earned him a place in the US market. “El Watusi” became the first Latin song to make the Billboard charts. Barretto continued to record with Tico Records until he decided to join a new label, United Artist Records. There, he was able to achieve a new sound, a West Indian sound closer to the style of the bands of the time, one that combined violin with trumpet and trombone. His first album with the label was “El Ray Criollo” in 1966, followed by “Señor 007” in 1969. The latter did not meet the artist’s own expectations. He followed these up with “Latino Con Soul” and “Viva Watusi,” collaborating with Adalberto Santiago on both. Barretto’s future would change course in 1967, the year he would sign with Fania Records, creating at that very moment the sound of the Ray Barretto Orchestra. His first album on the label was “Acid,” with the collaboration of Adalberto Santiago and Pete Bonet. He then recorded “Hard Hands,” “Together,” “Power,” “The Message,” and “Que Viva La Música.” Barretto was dealt a serious blow in 1972 when five of his best musicians left the orchestra to form the band Típica 73: Adalberto Santiago, Orestes Vilató, Johnny “Dandy” Rodríguez, René López, and Dave Pérez. On the spot, Barretto stopped making Salsa music to record the album “The Other Road,” which took him back to his Jazz roots. It wasn’t long, however, before Barretto returned to Salsa, with the album “Indestructible” and the voice of Roberto Romero –better known as Tito Allen– who replaced Adalberto Santiago. Tito Allen worked only briefly with “The King with the Firm Hand,” and was then replaced by Tito Gómez, who later accompanied Rubén Blades on the album “Barretto” in 1975. Immediately following this recording he made several Latin Jazz albums, and then reunited with Adalberto Santiago in 1979 to make the album “Rican/Struction.” A year later he made the album “Fuerza Gigante,” with vocals by Ray de la Paz and Eddie Temporal. This was followed by “Rhythm of Life,” released in 1982. In 1983, he produced the classic album “Tremendo Trío” with the collaboration of Celia Cruz and Adalberto Santiago. The album “Todo Se Va A Poder” was the next project for the Salsa musician, with vocals by Cali Alemán and Ray Sabaá. Tite Curet Alonso contributed the composition “Aquí Se Puede,” and the Ray Barretto Orchestra kept churning out the hits. In 1988, Barretto won a Grammy for the album “Ritmo En El Corazón,” with vocals by Celia Cruz. Storming onto the romantic Salsa scene that dominated the late 80s, Barretto made the album “Irresistible” in 1989. Later, with the production of the album “Soy Dichoso” in 1992, he ended his professional relationship with Fania Records. However, Barretto remained active on the music scene, hovering between Jazz and Salsa without ever losing his innovative spirit. Ray Barretto A legend in the world of Salsa and Latin Jazz. Manny Oquendo (Percussion): “The first time I met him was when we were recording with the Cuban flute player Lou Pérez. I was playing the timbal and Ray was playing the conga. I remember he was playing it with a Jazzy kind of style, and I told him not to play it that way, because we were doing a traditional Latin number. Ray and I have a lot in common. We were both born in Brooklyn, we both had two marriages, we both worked with José Curbelo and Tito Puente (but not together). When he was playing with his brass band, I was playing with Johnny Pacheco and his brass band. We socialized a lot, because the producers took advantage of the musical rivalry between his orchestra and Eddie Palmieri’s. We always had a lot of mutual respect.” Johnny “Dandy” Rodríguez: (Percussion): “When my father, Johnny ‘La Vaca’ Rodríguez, passed away, Ray went to the funeral. And I remember him telling me that when he first started out he got a lot of criticism and people called him “The White Mongo” because his style was very similar to Mongo Santamaría. My father gave him advice and support. He told him that he believed in him, and to just forget about it. Ray and I didn’t talk for many years because of what happened with Típica 73, but one day I ran into him in the bathroom at the Casa Blanca Club, and that’s when we started talking again. Later I recorded a Jazz album with him. I’ll always remember him as an intelligent musician ahead of his time.” Eddie Montalvo (Percussion): “I was going to see him at the Hunt’s Point Palace. I never dreamed I would ever meet him. One night he was playing a dance with Tony Pabón’s orchestra, and we switched with his orchestra in Boston. I remember that Johnny Rodríguez invited me to play the second conga on the song “Que Viva La Música,” with Johnny on the tumbador and Ray on the quinto. Barretto liked the way I played the tumbador. We worked together for a long time with the Fania All Stars. I always thought of him as my idol. I’ll never forget how when it was his turn to play at shows, he would say that I was just keeping his seat warm for him...” Andy González (Bass): “Barretto saw me playing with Monguito Santamaría the night they recorded the album “Fania All Stars at the Red Garter” and he asked me if I wanted to join his band. I didn’t give him an answer right then and there; I thought about it for four months before I said yes. I joined the group and we immediately recorded “Together” and then went to Venezuela. I remember we had two uniforms – one of them was a white tuxedo with a red shirt and a black sash. Well, it turned out that the night we were performing for the first time, at a dance in El Corso, the waiters had the exact same uniforms we did, and people kept confusing us and asking us for drinks. I also remember at one dance, while we were playing “La Hipocresía Y La Falsedad,” some guy shot another guy in the face, and people started rioting, and the promoter told us to just keep playing. We all got our instruments and got out of there. Ray always visited me at my house and we would listen to music. I visited him, too. The last time I played with him was at a Chico O’Farrill’s big band concert. He came up and did a number with us.” Jimmy Sabater (Vocals and Percussion): “I sang a lot of choruses with him on his first few albums with Fania Records. He played with me on my album ‘Solo.’ We were always friends, and I’m going to miss him a lot. Johnny Colón (Conductor and Musician): “When I started out with my orchestra, I switched with him at the Hot Point Palace. I’ll always remember him for being so attentive to his fans. He did everything for them; he never denied them any encores. He was a very intelligent musician and always thought about his family.” Gilberto “El Pulpo” Colón: (Piano) “I met Ray through Oscar Hernández. Every now and then Oscar couldn’t make it, so I would fill in. When Oscar left the band to go play with Rubén Blades, I joined Ray’s orchestra. Around that time Ray was always singing about La Paz. I was in Ray’s orchestra because Héctor Lavoe was in rehab and when Héctor got out, I left the Barretto Orchestra. Ray was upset, and told me that if I stayed, I would make more progress. He was right. But I was doing other things.” Ralph Irrizary: (Percussion) “I remember I was there when the Fania All Stars were recording ‘Our Latin Thing.’ I was 16 years old. I had always been a huge fan of the Barretto group, ever since I had become a musician. I met Ray one day when I was playing at the Corso. The club manager had been talking to Ray about me, because he knew Ray was looking for a timbal player. That day, Ray was going to come watch me and I was really nervous. We did the first set, and then the second, and Ray still wasn’t there. During the last number I always did a solo, and when I finished, I saw Ray standing there in the crowd, shaking snow off his coat. When the song ended, he told me he was going to give me a call to talk about rehearsing with his orchestra. Three months or so went by, and then he called. I thought he had forgotten about me, but he called and told me rehearsals were starting the next day and he was expecting me. I recorded with him on the album ‘Rican/Struction’ and not long after that we were going to be playing at Madison Square Garden. I had another job at the time, and I had to ask my boss for permission to go on a three-week tour of Venezuela. He told me no, and I was forced to resign. I’ve been a full-time musician ever since. I’ve been playing professionally for 26 straight years, and I owe it all to Ray Barretto. Orestes Vilató: (Percussion) “I started with Ray when he was playing the charanga. The charanga was losing steam, but the idea of adding a trumpet and a trombone was very successful. In my opinion, this idea reverberated in Cuba, because Changuito commented on the new sound. It also influenced bands like Los Van Van, Son 14, and others. In 1966, we won the first Momo de Oro in Venezuela for the song ‘Salsa y Dulzura.’ Ray was a complete musician; he would sit down at the piano to compose and arrange songs. He always said you had to listen to everything. Eddie Palmieri invited me to join his orchestra, and I told him I couldn’t, because I was making a lot of money doing advertising for Ray that he couldn’t do because of his health. Ray learned late how to drive his first car, which was one of those New York taxis. The album ‘Acid’ led me to the band Santana. Barretto was very romantic; he loved the way Graciela sang. He was a child in a man’s body. If I hadn’t met Ray I wouldn‘t have made anything of myself. The last thing he said to me was that he would see me in another world.” Pete Bonet: (Vocals) “I remember we were in Africa on a tour with James Brown, and all of a sudden this French guy came up on stage, took the microphone away from me, and started talking. The bass player understood what the guy was saying, and passed out. When he came to, he said that somebody had killed Martin Luther King and that the United States were burning. Something similar happened when we were on our way to California; we were passing through Texas, and we heard that somebody had killed John F. Kennedy. When we arrived, a three-day mourning period had been declared and we couldn’t play.” Jimmy Bosch: (Trombone) “I started working with Ray in the 80s. He was like a father to me. I remember during performances, when he tried to end the number we were playing, we would just keep on going. He would keep looking at us, trying to say: ‘Either I’m going to kill you, or you’re going to kill me.’ He was an inspiration to all of us. He always told us to better ourselves and learn new things. I hope that the legacy of this Afro-Caribbean musical giant never fades away. Dave Valentín (Flute): “The most intelligent man I have ever know. My best friend and one of the greatest musicians of his time. One time I invited him to play on a two-week tour in Europe. Ray told me it had been 25 years since he’d done that, and he agreed to come. I know he had a lot of fun, because he didn’t have to worry about leading. I gave his son Chris flute lessons.” Goerge Rivera: (Close Friend) “He was a tremendous musician and a real humanitarian. He always participated in benefits. All of his music had a lot of feeling, and a lot of purpose. He dominated the drums, and he was a friend to all. I’m going to miss him a lot.” Ray Barretto WORKIN’ IT “I need just a little more time.” was Ray Barretto’s standard line to Jerry Masucci whenever he asked the conguero about the progress of his recordings. Ray was the consummate perfectionist when it came to his sessions. He would spend hours in the studio during the mixing. He was also the only Fania artist that would insist on being present for the mastering, where the final dimension of sound quality is brought to a record before it is manufactured. By the time Ray was signed to Fania in 1967, he was already a pro in the studio. Ray developed his musical ear during the 1950’s and 1960’s recording as a sideman for many Jazz artists on the Prestige, Riverside and Blue Note record labels. Working with individuals like Dizzy Gillespie, Oliver Nelson, Art Farmer, and especially the engineer Rudy Van Gelder, Ray received a musical education unlike any he would have gotten formally, including at the prestigious Julliard, where he was discouraged from pursuing a career in music. Ray’s start as a bandleader came as a result of a conversation in 1961 with record producer Orrin Keepnews, who was looking to cash in on the pachanga craze that was beginning to take hold of the New York City club scene. Keepnews was looking to make a connection with either Charlie Palmieri or Johnny Pacheco to record a pachanga album for the Riverside label, a Jazz label back then. When Keepnews approached Ray to see if he could make the introduction, Ray asked to record the pachanga production himself. Keepnews agreed. Ray approached pianist/arranger Hector Rivera, and with his help recorded “Pachanga With Barretto”, the first of two albums on the Riverside label. According to pianist/arranger Alfredo Valdes, Jr., a member of Ray’s band, La Moderna, between January 1962 and December of 1963, the band was formed after the recording started to get airplay. The sound of La Moderna was conceived by Ray, who would assign the task of arranging the music to Alfredo, and pianist/arranger Gil Lopez, who at the time was with Tito Puente’s orchestra. During the two-year period that Alfredo was with the band five albums were recorded, two for Riverside, and three for Tico Records. The band worked out the repertoire at a weekly gig at the Tritons, a Bronx nightclub. When the musicians were comfortable with the new material they would go into the studio and record. Ray arrived at Fania with a new band. The new setup was a conjunto featuring two trumpets and a rhythm section comprised of piano, bass, timbal, and conga, along with two vocalists. The band featured Roberto Rodriguez and Rene Lopez (trumpet), Louie Cruz (piano), Orestes Vilato (timbal), and Adalberto Santiago and Pete Bonet on vocals. The band didn’t have a steady bassist until the arrival of a seventeen year old by the name of Andy Gonzalez, who would make his recording debut on “Together”. Eventually a bongocero would be added to the conjunto, the first being Tony Fuentes, who would later be replaced by John “Dandy” Rodriguez. A third trumpet would also be added later on as the band evolved. It was with this format that Ray would strike gold, both on the bandstand and the recording studio. Getting to that point, and remaining there, was due to his musical vision, and his skills as a bandleader, skills he developed after a long recording career as a sideman in Jazz, as well as with the bands of Jose Curbelo and Tito Puente. The band was always well rehearsed according to pianist/arranger, Louie Cruz. Louie further states that aside from rehearsing at Ray’s New Jersey home, the band would also rehearse any new material at their weekly gigs at venues such as the Corso, a legendary New York City nightclub. As he recalls, the band would arrive early to the gig and start the first set with the new material. The crowd’s reaction would be an indicator Ray would take into consideration when deciding if the tune made it into the band’s book. In Louie’s estimation, the tunes always made it into the band’s book due to Ray’s keen ear and musical vision. Ray had a great ear for music, and was always on top of things where the band was concerned, so much so that when Louie was given a tune to arrange Ray would show up at his home with the tune, and wait until the arrangement was completed the way he wanted it done. This process continued until Ray was completely confident that Louie understood his musical vision. After he was confident with Louie’s skills as an arranger, Louie was left alone. When the band went into the studio to record, it did so only when Ray was sure that they had the repertoire down so tight that they could comfortably perform it with confidence. Most of the tunes recorded for Fania were done with only one take, and very little overdubbing. Jon Fausty, who engineered many of Fania’s productions, recalls that Ray’s bands were always well rehearsed. There was always good communication between the band and Ray, and they fully understood his musical concepts. Jon viewed Ray as a highly educated individual, as well as an educator. He credits him as being instrumental in helping to form his views on how to properly present the rhythm section sonically. Ray was also very helpful in the studio during the mixing. Jon recalls that he had a grasp on how to modify the balances of his recordings, and would always insist on being present for the mastering with Jack Adelman at RCA studios, something the other artists never bothered with. With every Ray Barretto production, what the listener gets is the very best an artist has to offer, both musically and sonically. That is something that I’m sure you’ll appreciate after listening to this collection that spans over three decades. Written By George Rivera Remembering Ray Barretto Percussionist, Band leader, Composer, NEA Jazz Master & Grammy Award Winner Hard hands, warm heart, Ray Barretto’s legacy remains in the beat of the metronomic clave of Latin New York streets. From el barrio to the boogie down Bronx, from “do or die Bed-Stuy” to as far as France, musical tributes to the Puerto Rican percussionist are blasting from radios from the four corners of the world. Here in Spanish Harlem, the womb of Salsa music -where Rafael Hernandez opened the first Latin music store in 1927– many remember Ray Barretto. I first heard Ray over AM radio when I was about 13. I turned my transistor to Cousin Brucie’s Top Hits Countdown where I heard the sounds of Barretto’s hit, “Watusi” moving my mixed Boricua blood. I didn’t know then that Ray Barretto had already made a name for himself on the Jazz scene. That he had been born of Puerto Rican parents in Brooklyn, raised in El Barrio and then the South Bronx. All I knew was that this music belonged to my ‘hood and here it was on AM radio sandwiched between James Brown and the Beach Boys. We had arrived! His was an aggressive sound with sophisticated swing at a time when Ray’s band was the hottest thing in NYC. You could count on Ray to have the best musicians, creative arrangements and the most danceable of repertoires. When “Indestructible” was released, it stood out by dint of its cover photo fronting Ray as Clark Kent in the process of morphing into Superman. This was not your average corny cover of the time sporting near naked women or a bunch of ugly guys. This was a cover that related to my Boricua NYC life. Like the real Superman, that cover featured an ordinary man about to give us some extraordinary music that healed our souls while moving our bodies and nurturing our minds towards further horizons. More than 30 years later, that particular tune, “Indestructible,” remains the standard by which all young percussionists are measured. From Oreste Vilato (Santana fame) to Little Ray Romero (Eartha Kitt), Barretto always picked his boys from among the best. And when these two left for greener pastures, Barretto’s remarkable eye for talent fell on Little Jimmy Delgado (now with Belafonte), barely 17 when he debuted with the Barretto band. Later, a twenty two year old Ralph Irrizarry took the timbale chair before blowing up with Ruben Blades and the Mambo Kings movie. In fact, vocalist Ruben Blades had already recorded but it was with the Ray Barretto orchestra that he got his spotlight in New York. Ray Barretto loved Jazz, falling for the conga after hearing Chano Pozo’s recording of “Manteca” with Dizzy Gillespie in 1947. Ironically, it was that same tune of “Manteca” that became Barretto’s own on his debut recording with Red Garland. While he loved to play and make people dance it was the world of Jazz that would expand his perspective lifting his “muse” to higher ground, and us along with him. Ray Barretto: Un Boricua that made us proud to hear him play on American radio, made us proud to see him sharing stages and music with Chick Corea, James Moody, Kenny Burrell and Ramsey Lewis, and made us proud to dance to his music from the most prestigious music venues to the meanest streets. His sounds are part of the soundtrack of our lives. While Hippies rocked at Woodstock, we (salseros) took the field at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx moved by the thunderous power of Boricua Barretto’s drum playing alongside the Cuban Mongo Santamaria and the African Manu DiBango. “Que Viva La Musica” was our national “street” anthem, while “La Hypocresia and Falsedad” helped us look at ourselves and stem the crabs-in-a-basket mentality that affects all poor communities. I grew up to Ray Barretto as many Latino baby boomers did. His growth in music paralleled our growth as a community, coming of age in Nueva York where we danced between cultures while keeping the clave of our African ancestral roots alive. Written by Aurora Flores Ray Barretto por Robert Padilla De padres puertorriqueños, Raymond Barretto Pagan nació el 29 de abril del 1929, en Nueva York. Cuando apenas tenía 4 años de edad, su padre decidió regresar a Puerto Rico y abandonó su hogar. Su madre, entonces, se estableció en el sur del Bronx y crío sola a sus tres hijos. De temprana edad, Barretto fue influenciado por dos corrientes musicales: la latina y el Jazz. Durante el día, su madre escuchaba música de Daniel Santos, Bobby Capó y el trío Los Panchos. Sin embargo, en la medida en que creció fue encantándose con el trabajo de las agrupaciones de Machito Grillo, Marcelino Guerra y Arsenio Rodríguez, así como con el de las grandes orquestas de Jazz que escuchaba en la radio, tales como las de Benny Goodman y Duke Ellington. A los 17 años de edad, Barretto ingresó al ejército de Estados Unidos para la época de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Estando en Alemania, escuchó el sonido que definió el rumbo de su vida, el grupo de Dizzy Gillespie con Chano Pozo interpretando el clásico tema “Manteca”. A su salida del ejército, Barretto regresó a Nueva York e influenciado por los instrumentos de percusión que dominaba su ídolo Chano Pozo, compró un bongó. Pero, al no estar satisfecho con su sonido, se lanzó a comprar por 50 dólares unas tumbadoras que vendían en una panadería del barrio latino donde vivía. Así es que comenzó a dar sus primeros golpes en rumbones y clubes nocturnos. Su primera grabación musical fue en 1953, con el grupo de latin Jazz de Eddie Bonnemere, realizada en el salón Red Garter de Nueva York. A diferencia de los congueros famosos de aquella época, como Cándido Camero, Mongo Santamaría y Patato Valdés –que primero se iniciaron en ritmos afrocaribeños y que luego incursionaron en el Jazz, Barretto comenzó su carrera en el mundo del Jazz y no fue hasta años más tarde que incursionó en otros ritmos latinos. En una ocasión, el percusioncita Monchito Muñoz lo invitó a una audición con la orquesta de José Curbelo, donde se quedó trabajando por cuatro años, tiempo que sirvió para desarrollarse dentro del concepto de música latina bailable. Con esta agrupación, trabajó en la producción “Wine, Woman y Cha Cha Cha”, en 1955. Al mismo tiempo, sus conocimientos en el Jazz le permitieron trabajar con distintas agrupaciones de la época, como la de Max Roach, Charlie Parker, Art Blakey, Herbie Man, Dizzy Gillespie y Cal Tjader. A finales de 1961, se le presentó la oportunidad de grabar un disco para la compañía Riverside Records, propiedad de Orrin Keepnews, quien entonces deseaba desarrollar un catálogo de música latina. Fue ese empresario el que le sugirió a Barretto que formara un grupo de música para grabar, provocando de esa manera la fundación de La Charanga Moderna. Con la Charanga Moderna, Barretto alteró el formato instrumental de las charangas tradicionales con el uso de la trompeta y el trombón, en un acto radical. En 1962, el músico hizo notar su presencia en el ambiente musical con la producción “Pachanga with Barretto”. Tras la buena aceptación lograda en su arranque, continuó con la producción del álbum “Latino”, en 1963. Luego, arribó al sello Tico Records junto a quien produjo “Charanga Moderna”, que le derivó su éxito “El Watusi”.Con este tema, Barretto logró entrar al mercado americano al punto de valerle su primer Disco de Oro y vendiendo mas de un millón de unidades. “El Watusi” se convirtió en la primera melodía latina en aparecer en las listas de los Billboards. Barretto continuó grabando para el sello Tico, hasta que decidió grabar con una nueva casa disquera llamada United Artist Records. En esta disquera, logró un sonido distinto, más antillano y próximo a la modalidad de los conjuntos de la época, donde combinó los violines con las trompetas y el trombón. En esa línea, su primer trabajo fue “El Ray Criollo”, en 1966, seguido por “Señor 007”, en 1967, un disco que no complació las expectativas del artista. Las propuestas musicales que siguieron fueron “Latino Con Soul” y “Viva Watusi”, en las que contó con la participación de Adalberto Santiago. El futuro de Barretto alteró su rumbo en 1967 al firmar un contrato con el sello Fania Records, armando en ese momento el sonido de la orquesta de Ray Barretto. Su primer trabajo con este sello fue “Acid”, que contó con la participación de Adalberto Santiago y Pete Bonet. Luego, junto a Fania, hizo “Hard Hands”, “Together”, “Power”, “The Message” y “Qué Viva la Música”. Barretto sufrió un duro golpe en 1972 cuando cinco de sus mejores músicos se marcharon de su orquesta para formar el conjunto Típica 73: Adalberto Santiago, Orestes Vilató, Johnny “Dandy” Rodríguez, René López y Dave Pérez. Justo en ese momento, Barretto paró su trabajo en la Salsa para grabar el disco “The Other Road”, que lo regresó a sus influencias de Jazz. No pasó mucho tiempo para que Barretto regresara al mercado discográfico salsero con el álbum “Indestructible”, vocalizando Roberto Romero, mejor conocido por Tito Allen, quien sustituyó a Adalberto Santiago. Tito Allen estuvo poco tiempo en la banda de “El Rey De Las Manos Duras” y a su salida fue sustituido por Tito Gómez, quien luego se acompañó de Rubén Blades para hacer el disco “Barretto”, en 1975. Inmediatamente después de esta grabación, el músico trabajó varios discos de Jazz latino hasta que en 1979 se reencontró con Adalberto Santiago y produjo el álbum “Rican/Struction”. Un año después, hizo el disco “Fuerza Gigante”, en el que cantó Ray de la Paz y Eddie Temporal. Ese trabajo estuvo seguido por “Rhythm of Life”, producido en 1982. En 1983, se trabajó el clásico disco “Tremendo Trío”, en la que el percusionista se unió a Celia Cruz y Adalberto Santiago. El disco “Todo Se Va A Poder” fue lo próximo en el catálogo del artista salsero, vocalizando Cali Alemán y Ray Sabaá. Tite Curet Alonso le escribió “Aquí Se Puede” y la orquesta de Barretto siguió cosechando éxitos. En 1988, ganó un Grammy con la producción “Ritmo En El Corazón”, vocalizando Celia Cruz. Incursionando en la corriente de la Salsa romántica que dominó a finales de los años 80, el líder de orquesta produjo el álbum “Irresistible”, en 1989. Más adelante, en 1992, con la producción de “Soy Dichoso” concluyó su relación comercial con Fania. No obstante, Barretto se mantuvo activo en la música transitando entre el Jazz y la Salsa sin abandonar su espíritu innovador. Ray Barretto cimera figura en el mundo de la Salsa y el Jazz latino Manny Oquendo: (Percusionista) “La primera vez que lo conocí fue en una grabación con el flautista cubano Lou Pérez. Yo tocaba timbal y Ray la conga. Recuerdo que estaba tocando conga al estilo de Jazz y le dije que no tocara así porque el tema era tradicional (latino). Ray y yo tenemos muchas cosas en común, ambos nacimos en Brooklyn, nos casamos dos veces, trabajamos con José Curbelo y Tito Puente (no juntos). Cuando el tocaba con su charanga, yo tocaba con Pacheco y su charanga. Alternábamos mucho, debido a que los productores se aprovechaban del reto musical que existía entre su orquesta y la de Eddie Palmieri... siempre nos respetamos mutuamente.” Johnny “Dandy” Rodríguez: (Percusionista) “Cuando mi padre, Johnny “La Vaca” Rodríguez, murió, Ray fue a la funeraria. Y recuerdo que me dijo que cuando el comenzó lo criticaban mucho y le decían “El Mongo Blanco” porque tenía un estilo parecido al de Mongo Santamaría. Mi padre lo aconsejó y le dio apoyo. Le dijo que creía en su talento y que echara pa’ lante. Ray y yo tuvimos muchos años sin hablarnos por lo de la Típica 73, pero un día me lo encontré en el Club Casa Blanca, en el baño, y comenzamos nuevamente a hablar. Luego grabe con él en un disco de Jazz. Siempre lo voy a recordar como un músico bien inteligente y adelantado a su época.” Eddie Montalvo: (Percusionista) “Iba de chamaco a verlo al Club Hunt’s Point Palace. Nunca me imaginé que lo iba a conocer. Una noche estaba tocando en un baile con la orquesta de Tony Pabón y alternamos con su orquesta, en Boston. Recuerdo que Johnny Rodríguez me invitó para que tocara la segunda conga en el tema “Qué Viva la Música”, Johnny en la tumbadora y Ray quinteaba. A Barretto le gustaba como le daba el golpe seco (galleta) a la tumbadora. Trabajamos mucho tiempo juntos con Las Estrellas de Fania. Siempre lo vi como mi ídolo. Nunca olvidaré que cuando le tocaba tocar a él, en las presentaciones, le decía que esta era su silla y que yo sólo se la calentaba...”. Andy González: (Bajista) “Barretto me vio tocando con Monguito Santamaría la noche que grabaron el disco “Fania All Star en el Red Garter” y me preguntó si quería tocar con su orquesta. Yo no le conteste al instante, lo pensé cuatro meses hasta que accedí. Entré inmediatamente al grupo, grabamos “Together” y rápido viajamos a Venezuela. Recuerdo que teníamos dos uniformes y uno de ellos era un tuxido blanco, con camisa roja y una faja negra. Resulta que el día que lo estrenamos fue en un baile en El Corso y los mozos tenían el mismo uniforme que nosotros, nos confundían y nos pedían tragos. También recuerdo que en un baile, tocando el tema “La Hipocresía Y La Falsedad”, un tipo le disparó a otro en la cara de nosotros y se formó un motín y el promotor nos dijo que siguiéramos tocando. En ese momento cogimos nuestros instrumentos y nos fuimos. Ray siempre me visitaba a mi casa y escuchábamos música y yo lo visitaba a él. La ultima vez que toqué con él fue en un concierto de la banda grande de Chico O’Farril, él subió y tocó un tema con nosotros”. Jimmy Sabater: (Cantante y Percusionista) “Hice muchos coros con él para sus primeros álbumes con Fania. Grabó conmigo en mi álbum “Solo”. Fuimos amigos siempre y me va hacer mucha falta”. Johnny Colón: (Director y Músico) “Cuando comencé con mi orquesta alterné con él en el Club Hot Point Palace. Siempre lo recordaré por lo atento que era con su público. Hacía todo por ellos, nunca se negaba a tocarle temas extras. Fue un músico muy inteligente y siempre pensó en su familia”. Gilberto “El Pulpo” Colón: (Pianista) “A través de Oscar Hernández conocí a Ray. Habían ocasiones en que Oscar no podía asistir y yo lo sustituía. Cuando Oscar dejó la banda para irse con Rubén Blades, entré de lleno a tocar con la orquesta. Para ese tiempo cantaba Ray de La Paz. Estuve en la orquesta de Ray porque Héctor Lavoe estaba en un programa de rehabilitación y cuando Héctor salió, salí de la orquesta de Barretto. Ray se molestó y me dijo que con él iba a progresar más, y tenía razón. Pero yo estaba pendiente a otras cosas”. Ralph Irrizary: (Percucionista) “Recuerdo que cuando Fania estaba grabando “Our Latin Thing” yo estuve allí. Tenía 16 años de edad. Siempre fui fanático del grupo de Barretto, desde antes que me convirtiera en músico profesional. Conocí a Ray un día tocando en El Corso. El gerente del club le había hablado a Ray sobre mi, debido a que él estaba buscando un timbalero. Ese día Ray venía a verme y estaba bien nervioso. Pasó el primero y el segundo set y Ray no llegaba. En el último número siempre me tocaba dar un solo y, pues, cuando terminé veo a Ray en el público con un abrigo, sacudiéndose la nieve. Cuando el baile terminó me dijo que me iba a llamar para que ensayara con la orquesta. Pasaron como tres meses y me llamó. Yo pensé que se había olvidado de mí y me informó que al día siguiente empezaban los ensayos y que contaba conmigo. Grabé en el disco Rican/Struction y rápido nos presentamos en el Madison Square Garden. Yo trabajaba y me encontré en la situación de pedir permiso a mi jefe para poder ir a una gira de tres semanas a Venezuela. Me negaron el permiso y me vi obligado a renunciar y desde ese momento soy un músico a tiempo completo. Llevo 26 años ininterrumpidos y todo se lo debo a Ray Barretto. En un baile sólo llegaron cuatro músicos a tiempo, yo (timbal), una trompeta, un trombón y Ray. Comenzamos así y en el transcurso del tema la orquesta se fue completando. De Ray aprendí a ser responsable y un líder de orquesta”. Orestes Vilató: (Percucionista) “Comencé con Ray cuando tocaba charanga. La charanga estaba perdiendo fuerza pero la idea de añadir una trompeta y un trombón fue muy exitosa. A mi opinión, esa idea tuvo repercusiones en Cuba debido a que Changuito comentó el cambio de sonido. También fue inspiración para orquestas como Los Van Van, Son 14, entre otras. En 1966 ganamos el premio Momo de Oro en Venezuela por el tema Salsa y Dulzura. Ray era un músico completo, se sentaba en el piano a componer y arreglar temas. Siempre decía que había que escuchar de todo. Eddie Palmieri me ofreció para que entrara a su orquesta y le dije que no porque yo hacía muchos anuncios que Ray no podía hacer debido a su salud y eso me dejaba mucho dinero. Ray aprendió a guiar tarde su primer carro que fue de los que los taxistas usaban en Nueva York. El álbum Acid me llevó al grupo de Santana. Barretto era muy romántico, le gustaba mucho como cantaba Graciela. Era un niño en cuerpo de hombre. Si no lo hubiese conocido no fuera nadie. Lo último que me dijo en vida fue que me veía en la otra rumba”. Pete Bonet: (Cantante) “Recuerdo que estábamos en África, en una gira con James Brown, y de repente un francés se subió a la tarima y me quitó el micrófono y comenzó a hablar. El bajista entendía lo que él estaba diciendo y se desmayó. Cuando el bajista despertó nos dijo que habían matado a Martin Luther King y que estaban quemando a Estados Unidos. Algo parecido pasó cuando estábamos de camino a California, cuando íbamos por Texas nos enteramos que habían matado a John F. Kennedy. Cuando llegamos declararon tres días de luto y no pudimos tocar”. Jimmy Bosch: (Trombonista) “Comencé para los ochenta a trabajar con Ray. Fue como un padre para mí. Recuerdo que en las presentaciones, cuando mandaba a cerrar el número, continuábamos con otra moña y él nos miraba tratándonos de decir: ‘O yo te mato, o tú me matas a mí’. Fue fuente de inspiración para nosotros. Siempre nos aconsejaba a que nos superáramos y a aprender cosas nuevas. Espero que al fallecer este gigante de la música afroantillana su legado no pase en vano y que se siga escuchando ese gran trabajo que nos deja”. Dave Valentín: (Flautista) “El hombre más inteligente que he conocido. Mi mejor amigo y uno de los más grandes músicos de su época. En una ocasión lo invité como músico a una gira de dos semanas por Europa. Ray me contestó que hacía más de 25 años que no hacia eso, y accedió. Sé que lo disfrutó mucho porque se sintió que no hizo nada, sin tener la preocupación de dirigir. Yo le di clases de flauta a su hijo Chris”. George Rivera: (Coleccionista y Amigo) Tremendo músico y muy humanitario. Siempre cooperaba en actividades benéficas. Toda su música fue hecha con mucho sentido y con un propósito. Dominaba muy bien la batería y era amigo de todos. Lo voy a extrañar mucho”. Ray Barretto Workin’ It “Sólo necesito un poquito más de tiempo.” Era la línea estándar de Ray Barretto a Jerry Masucci, cuando este último le preguntaba al conguero sobre los progresos de sus grabaciones. Ray era el consumado perfeccionista cuando venía a sus sesiones. Hubiese pasado horas en el estudio durante la mezcla. También era el único artista de Fania que insistía en estar presente para la masterización, cuando la dimensión final de la calidad del sonido es llevado a un disco antes de que se fabrique. Por la época que Ray fue incorporado a Fania en 1967, ya era un pro en el estudio. Ray desarrolló su oído musical durante los cincuenta y los sesenta, grabando como miembro de orquesta de varios artistas de Jazz en los sellos Prestige, Riverside y Blue Note. Al trabajar con individuos como Dizzy Gillespie, Oliver Nelson, Art Farmer, especialmente, con el ingeniero Rudy Van Gelder, Ray recibió una educación musical diferente a la de cualquiera que la hubiese tenido formalmente, incluida la prestigiosa Julliard, donde fue desalentado para seguir una carrera musical. Los comienzos de Ray como líder de orquesta surgieron como resultado de una conversación en 1961 con el productor Orrin Keepnews, quien estaba buscando aprovechar el furor de la pachanga, que estaba comenzando a apoderarse de la escena de los clubes de la ciudad de Nueva York. Keepnews estaba buscando hacer conexiones con Charlie Palmieri o Johnny Pacheco para grabar un álbum de pachanga para el sello Riverside, un sello de Jazz en ese entonces. Cuando Keepnews se acercó a Ray para ver si el podía hacer la introducción, Ray le pidió grabar la producción de pachanga él mismo. Keepnews aceptó. Ray propuso al pianista/arreglador Héctor Rivera y con su ayuda grabó “Pachagan Con Barretto”, el primero de dos álbumes con el sello Riverside. Según el pianista/arreglador Alfredo Valdés, Jr. miembro de la orquesta de Ray, La Moderna, entre enero de 1962 y diciembre de 1963, la orquesta fue formada después de que la grabación comenzó a salir al aire. El sonido de La Moderna fue concebido por Ray, quien asignaría la tarea de arreglar la música a Alfredo y al pianista/arreglador Gil López, que en ese momento estaba en la orquesta de Tito Puente. Durante el período de dos años que Alfredo estuvo con la orquesta, se grabaron cinco álbumes, dos para Riverside y tres para Tico Records. La orquesta ensayaba el repertorio en una actuación semanalmente en el Tritons, un club nocturno del Bronx. Cuando los músicos se sentían bien con el nuevo material, iban al estudio y grababan. Ray llegó a Fania con una nueva orquesta. La nueva agrupación era un conjunto que presentaba dos trompetas y una sección rítmica, comprendida de un piano, un bajo, timbal y conga, junto con dos vocalistas. La orquesta presentó a Roberto Rodríguez y René López (trompeta), Louie Cruz (piano), Orestes Vilató (timbal) y Adalberto Santiago y Pete Bonet en voces. La orquesta no tenía un bajista permanente hasta la llegada de un muchacho de diecisiete años, de nombre Andy González, quien haría su grabación debut en “Together”. Finalmente, un bongocero se agregaría al conjunto, el primero fue Tony Fuentes, que más tarde sería reemplazado por John “Dandy” Rodríguez. Más tarde, también se sumaría una tercera trompeta a medida que evolucionaba la orquesta. Fue con este formato que Ray alcanzaría el oro, en las disquerías y en el estudio de grabación. Llegar a ese punto y permanecer allí, se debió a su visión musical y sus habilidades como líder de orquesta, habilidades desarrolladas después una larga carrera de grabaciones como miembro de orquestas de Jazz, así como con las orquestas de José Curbelo y Tito Puente. La orquesta estaba siempre bien ensayada según el pianista/arreglador, Louie Cruz. Louie señala que aparte de los ensayos en la casa de Ray en Nueva Jersey, la orquesta también ensayaba cualquier material nuevo en las actuaciones semanales en lugares como el Corso, un legendario club nocturno de la ciudad de Nueva York. Como recuerda, la orquesta llegaba temprano a la actuación y comenzaba el primer grupo con el material nuevo. La reacción de la multitud era un indicador que Ray consideraba cuando decidía si el tema se convertía en repertorio de la orquesta. En estimación de Louie, los temas siempre entraron en el repertorio de la orquesta, debido al oído agudo y la visión musical de Ray. Ray tuvo un gran oído para la música, y estuvo siempre en control de las cosas, donde la orquesta estuvo envuelta, hasta tal grado que cuando a Louie se le entregaba un tema para arreglar, Ray se aparecía en su casa con el tema y esperaba que el arreglo fuese completado de la manera que el deseaba. Este proceso continuó hasta que Ray estaba completamente seguro de que Louie comprendía su visión musical. Después de estar seguro de las habilidades de Louie como arreglador, lo dejo solo. Cuando la orquesta iba al estudio para grabar, lo hacía sólo cuando Ray estaba seguro de que tenían el repertorio tan ordenado que podían tocarlo cómodamente con seguridad. La mayoría de los temas grabados para Fania fueron hechos en una sola toma y muy poca grabación superpuesta. Jon Fausty, ingeniero a cargo de varias producciones de Fania, recuerda que la orquesta de Ray estaba siempre bien ensayada. Había siempre Buena comunicación entre la orquesta y Ray, y ellos comprendían completamente sus conceptos musicales. Jon veía a Ray como un individuo muy educado, al mismo tiempo que como un educador. Él le da el crédito de haber sido un instrumento en la ayuda para formar su perspectiva de cómo presentar adecuadamente la sección rítmica de manera sonora. Ray también fue muy útil en el estudio durante la mezcla. Jon recuerda que él tenía conocimiento de cómo modificar los balances de su grabación y siempre insistía en estar presente para la masterización con Jack Adelman en los estudios RCA, algo con los que otros artistas no se molestarían. Con cada producción de Ray Barretto, lo que el auditor obtiene es lo mejor que un artista tiene que ofrecer, en lo musical y en el sonido. Eso es algo que estoy seguro apreciarán después de escuchar esta colección que abarca más de tres décadas. Escrito por George Rivera Recordando a Ray Barretto Percusionista, Líder de Orquesta, Compositor, Master en Jazz NEA & Ganador del Premio Grammy Manos duras, corazón caliente, el legado de Ray Barretto permanece en el latido del clave metronómico de las calles del Nueva York latino. Desde el barrio hasta el Bronx fiestero, desde el “peligroso Bed-Stuy” hasta la lejana Francia, los tributos musicales al percusionista puertorriqueño están estallando en las radios desde las cuatro esquinas del mundo. Aquí, en el Harlem hispano, la cuna de la música Salsa -donde Rafael Hernández abrió la primera tienda de música latina en 1927- muchos recuerdan a Ray Barretto. Escuché a Ray por primera vez en una radio AM, cuando tenía alrededor de 13 años. Cambié mi radio a transistores al programa Top Hits Countdown (Cuenta Regresiva de Éxitos) del Primo Brucie, donde escuché los sonidos de un éxito de Barretto, “Watusi”, que movían mi mezcla de sangre Boricua. En ese entonces, no sabía que Ray Barretto ya se había hecho un nombre el mismo en la escena. Que había nacido en Brooklyn, que sus padres eran puertorriqueños, que había crecido en El Barrio y, luego, en el área sur del Bronx. Todo lo que sabía era que esta música pertenecía a mi entorno y aquí estaba en una radio AM, entre la música de James Brown y los Beach Boys. ¡Habíamos llegado! Él tenía un sonido agresivo con un movimiento sofisticado, en un momento en que la orquesta de Ray era lo más popular en Nueva York. Se podía confiar en que Ray tenía los mejores músicos, los arreglos más creativos y el repertorio más bailable. Cuando “Indestructible” fue lanzado al Mercado, se destacó a fuerza de su carátula que mostraba a Ray como Clark Kent en el proceso de cambio a Superman. Esta no es la típica carátula del momento, que luce a una mujer casi desnuda o un grupo de tipos feos. Ésta era una carátula que se relacionaba con mi vida Boricua neoyorquina. Al igual que el Superman real, esa carátula mostraba a un hombre común que estaba a punto de darnos algo de esa música extraordinaria que curó nuestras almas, mientras movíamos nuestros cuerpos, que moldeó nuestras mentes hacia nuevos horizontes. Más de 30 años después, el particular tema, “Indestructible,” sigue siendo el estándar por el que se miden los jóvenes percusionistas. Desde Oreste Vilató (renombrado por Santana) hasta Little Ray Romero (Eartha Kilt), Barretto siempre escogió a sus muchachos de entre lo mejor. Y cuando estos dos se fueron en busca de pastos más verdes, el destacable ojo que Barretto tenía para encontrar talentos, recayó sobre Little Jimmy Delgado (ahora con Belafonte), que contaba con escasos 17 años, cuando debutó con la orquesta de Barretto. Después, Ralph Irrizarry, de veintidós años, tomo el lugar en los timbales antes de que se inflará con Rubén Blades y la película los Reyes del Mambo. De hecho, el vocalista Rubén Blades ya había grabado con anterioridad, pero fue con la orquesta de Ray Barretto que él logró destacar en Nueva York. Ray Barretto amaba el Jazz, sucumbiendo a la conga después de escuchar la grabación que Chano Pozo hiciera de “Manteca” con Dizzy Gillespie en 1974. Irónicamente, fue con el tema “Manteca,” con el que se convirtió en éxito en su grabación debut con Red Garter. En tanto el amaba tocar y hacer a la gente bailar, fue el mundo del Jazz el que expandiría su perspectiva, elevando a su “musa” a estadios superiores y a nosotros con él. Ray Barretto Un Boricua que nos hace sentir orgullosos de escucharlo en la radio norteamericana, de verlo compartir escenarios y música con Chick Corea, James Moody, Kenny Burell y Ramsey Lewis y que nos hace sentir orgullosos de bailar su música desde los lugares más prestigiosos hasta las calles más humildes. Sus sonidos son parte de las bandas sonoras de nuestras vidas. Mientras los hippies hacían rock en Woodstock, nosotros (los salseros) nos tocaba en campo en el Yankee Stadium en el Bronx, movidos por el poder relampagueante del tambor Boricua de Barretto, tocando con el cubano Mongo Santamaría y el africano Manú DiBango. “Que Viva La Música” era nuestro himno nacional en las “calles”, mientras que “La Hipocresía” nos ayudaba a mirarnos y a detener una mentalidad cerrada que afecta a todas las comunidades pobres. Crecí con Ray Barretto, al igual que muchos latinos de la época de la explosión demográfica. Su crecimiento en la música fue en paralelo a nuestro crecimiento como una comunidad, que viene de una época en Nueva York, donde bailábamos entre culturas, mientras manteníamos viva la clave de nuestras raíces ancestrales africanas. Escrito por Aurora Flores