s

Ruben Blades

A Man And His Music - Poeta Del Pueblo

$1.50

Ruben Blades

A Man And His Music - Poeta Del Pueblo

$19.99 Album
$19.99 Album
$19.99 Album
Descarga Caliente
Canto Abacua
El Cazangero
Los Muchachos De Belen
Pablo Pueblo
Plantacion Adentro
Me Recordaras
Juan Pachanga
Paula C
Sin Tu Carino
Plastico
Buscando Guayaba
Dime
Pedro Navaja
Manuela
El Nacimiento De Ramiro
Maestra Vida
La Palabra Adios
Tiburon
Te Estan Buscando
Ligia Elena
Madame Kalalu
Para Ser Rumbero
Noe
No Hay Chance
Mi Jibarita
El Cantante
This collection of classic tracks recorded by Rubén Blades for the Fania label includes some of the most exhilarating anthems in the history of salsa. Songs like "Pablo Pueblo," "Tiburón" and the legendary "Pedro Navaja" are as fun and danceable as Afro-Caribbean music can be. But they also occupy a meaningful place within the development of this music: Blades' songbook signifies the coming of age of salsa - its maturity as a limitless Latin genre with the ability to make you dance and think at the same time. In a different time and place, Blades could have become a thoughtful rocker or a revolutionary troubadour. Was it fate that decided his birth in Panama and his subsequent move to New York during the '70s? No matter what path he chose, Blades still occupies a place of honor among Latin giants like Cuba's Silvio Rodríguez, Brazil's Milton Nascimento and Spain's Joan Manuel Serrat. The fact that salsa was his genre of choice was a blessing for tropical music. The songs in this compilation mark a before and after for salsa. Things would never be the same after Blades' commercial and artistic triumph during the late '70s and early '80s. Together with singer Héctor Lavoe and trombonist, composer and producer Willie Colón, Blades formed a Holy Trinity of sorts within the Afro-Caribbean field. Lavoe was the voice. Colón was the sonic alchemist, the enabler. And Blades was the socially conscious poet, whose lyrics and adventurous cosmovision would inspire generations of Latino music lovers. "People still memorize the lyrics of a song, at a time when poetry is no longer being read," Blades told me during an interview conducted at his Los Angeles home a few years ago. "Without any literary pretensions on my end, I gave people poems that offered recognizable images and situations. I think that's why songs like 'Pablo Pueblo' and 'Pedro Navaja' enjoyed such a wide acceptance." It could be argued that Blades reached his artistic apex on the superlative albums that he recorded for the Elektra label during the second half of the '80s. And that he became a truly global musician throughout the '90s and the new millennium, when he created a new, eclectic hybrid of pan-Latino popular music on gorgeous records such as 1992's Amor y Control and 2002's Mundo. Even though he has kept busy working in politics and as a Hollywood actor, Blades is still recording new music - his future albums will undoubtedly continue to surprise, challenge and delight his listeners. This compilation focuses on the dizzying years following the New York salsa explosion of the '70s when Blades became one of the genre's most charismatic stars. The music on these two discs is all about the promise of a singer/songwriter who was only beginning to shine. To this day, the albums that Blades recorded for Fania stand as some of the most unique, addictive and treasured jewels in the label's illustrious history. Descarga Caliente Born in 1948, Blades traveled to New York in 1969, where he recorded his debut album with the help of producer Pancho Cristal. Titled De Panamá A Nueva York, the session was produced with the orchestra of boogaloo master Pete Rodríguez. The album was not a hit, but a young Blades got to listen to himself on the airwaves for the first time when the single "Descarga Caliente" was played on Colombian radio. Canto Abacuá In 1974, Blades returned to the United States, and eventually moved to New York, where he got a job as a mailroom assistant with Fania Records. He quickly positioned himself as a name to watch, giving his excellent compositions to many of the label's big artists, and performing vocals with Ray Barretto's orchestra. This epic song is culled from the seminal Barretto! album. El Cazangero Included in Willie Colón's transitional 1975 LP The Good, The Bad and The Ugly, "El Cazangero" is the first song that sounds like a bona fide Rubén Blades classic. Aided by Colón's velvety production, the song is a mesmerizing fusion of Brazilian samba beats, a funky brass section and Blades' perennially nostalgic vocals. Pablo Pueblo In just a couple of years, Blades blossomed as a composer and performer. His work was also boosted by his partnership with Colón, who had just left the orchestra he shared with Héctor Lavoe. The duo's first album, Metiendo Mano, opens with the singer's first serious attempt at delivering a strong social message. The lyrics, about the life of a working class family man who falls victim to the corruption and institutional indifference of your average Latin American country, are heartbreaking. The sophisticated musical accompaniment brims with texture and majestic shades. Juan Pachanga The late '70s was a time of feverish activity for Blades. Although Fania executives were initially reluctant to release his songs, stating that "no one likes to hear depressing lyrics," they quickly realized that Blades' own brand of salsa had tremendous sales potential. The singer became one of the label's biggest names, and he was dutifully invited to participate in the studio recordings of the famed Fania All Stars. Included in the 1977 LP Rhythm Machine, "Juan Pachanga" boasts a hip arrangement by Louie Ramírez and Blades' poignant lyrics about a Latino party animal with a broken heart. Watch for the timeless keyboard solo by Papo Lucca - one of Blades's most admired piano players, and the leader of Puerto Rico's infamous Sonora Ponceña. Paula C A lush, autobiographical tour de force focusing on Blades' first serious romantic relationship. Once again, the influence of Brazilian music (perhaps Rubén's favorite music genre) adds variety to the mix. One of the singer's most melodramatic productions, and a concert favorite to this day. Plástico Here's one of Rubén's most brilliant compositional tricks: a shimmering disco intro that unfolds, beautifully, into a rugged Afro-Cuban beat and a virulent indictment of shallow people and their insidious prejudices. And who can forget the grand finale, when he makes a call for Latin American unity by shouting out the names of every single one of the continent's many nations? The opening track of the 1978 smash Siembra, the epitome of the Blades/Colón collaboration, and for a very long time, the biggest selling album in the history of salsa. Made up of seven timeless tracks, Siembra also includes the hilarious solo de boca (mouth solo) of "Buscando Guayaba" (because the guitarist just forgot to show up), as well as the hypnotic melody of "Dime." And, of course, the sheer magic of "Pedro Navaja." Pedro Navaja Who says there's no place for literature in salsa? Merging Bertolt Brecht with Franz Kafka and barrio folklore, Blades narrates the gory encounter between a vicious prostitute and the title's infamous thug, concluding with the quintessential Latin chorus: la vida te da sorpresas /sorpresas te da la vida, ay Dios ("life gives you all sorts of surprises, oh God".) Together with Lavoe's "El Cantante" (yet another Blades composition), "Pedro Navaja" is arguably the quintessential salsa anthem. "When they heard it for the first time, the label executives told me that it was no good," the singer recalls with a laugh. "That it was too long, that the lyrics were too complicated and people just wanted to have fun. I don't think they ever understood why it became so popular." Manuela In 1980, Blades released the most ambitious project of his entire career: a double LP salsa musical entitled Maestra Vida. The bittersweet story focused on a couple's lifelong love affair, and commented on the never ending carnival of Latin American reality. Backed by a symphony orchestra, Colón's production was appropriately sumptuous, but the songs themselves could not match Siembra in terms of melodic content. Still, Maestra Vida stands as one of the most unique projects in the Afro-Caribbean genre. Since its release, Blades has often spoken about recording the third and final installment of this sweeping Latin saga. Tiburón 1981 found an invigorated Blades and Colón returning with Canciones del Solar de los Aburridos. The duo would later collaborate on the soundtrack to the ill-fated movie The Last Fight, and reunite in 1995 for Tras La Tormenta - a so-called reunion album that found them recording their alleged duets in separate studios. Canciones would be their last masterpiece together. "It's amazing to me that our partnership lasted so long," Willie Colón said candidly during an interview. "There just wasn't enough space in the same room for two egos of that size." The opening track of Canciones, "Tiburón" is a brutal political metaphor about the relationship between Latin America and the U.S. that motivated some listeners to misunderstand Blades as a rabid leftist. Colón's opulent arrangement is peerless, and the moody sound effects add texture to this transcendental tropical gem, which has been recently covered by Latin rock singer Vicentico. Ligia Elena Also from Canciones, "Ligia Elena" illustrates Blades' knack for narratives imbued in humor and romance. The story of a young girl from a good family who runs away with a penniless trumpet player and ignites the envy of other aristocratic beauties boasts a buoyant reading from Rubén - as well as a hilarious coro by Rubén and Willie. The song may be humorous, but it continues Blades' ongoing indictment of the racism and social prejudice than run rampant in Latin American society. Decades after its original release, "Ligia Elena" still rings true. No Hay Chance In 1984, Blades began an exciting new chapter in his recording career by dropping his customary big band in favor of a jazzier sextet (Seis del Solar, led by virtuoso pianist Oscar Hernández.) He signed with Elektra Records and released the masterful Buscando América. He still owed the Fania label some music, though, which was eventually released without the singer's supervision. The 1986 album Doble Filo, from which the last three cuts on this compilation are culled, was one such release. "Fania made a mess out of the last couple of albums that I did for them," Blades told me in 1995. "They took out the vibes and saxophones and added trombones. They changed the sequence of the songs and omitted the musicians' credits." Still, there is much to enjoy in this straight-ahead salsa tune about a spiteful guy who refuses to take an old love back - ideal for those who mistakenly think that Blades' lyrical scope was limited strictly to heavy subject matter. Mi Jibarita Blades has fond memories of this unassuming tune, written by David Martínez. Part of the wave of salsa songs that presented a romanticized - and utterly unrealistic - vision of life in the Latin American countryside, "Mi Jibarita" tells the story of the man who has left the stress of the big city behind, retreating to the country with a curvaceous beauty. Notice how most of the narrative is introduced by the background vocalists. When Blades' voice finally comes in, it soars. El Cantante During the Fania years, Blades made a conscious attempt to distance himself from those fellow label mates who were heavily into drugs. The singer has often stated that even though he was never a close friend of Héctor Lavoe, he still felt a great deal of admiration for him and his gifted vocalizing. Blades showed his respect in 1978, when he decided to give Héctor the song "El Cantante" - which he had originally written as a vehicle for himself. Thanks to Lavoe's gutsy delivery and Colón's stylized production values, the song became Héctor's signature tune. Blades' own version of the song is lighter in spirit than the Lavoe original, but it boasts a rollicking sense of swing, impeccable timing and Rubén's trademark sense of humor. He will always be remembered as the ultimate salsa songwriter - the Panamanian salsero who had a lot to say. But he was also an inspired sonero, on the same level as Beny Moré, Cheo Feliciano or Ismael Rivera. This rarely heard version of "El Cantante" is a fitting finale to an anthology of timeless Rubén Blades classics. Written by ERNESTO LECHNER Esta colección de clásicos grabados por Rubén Blades para la compañía Fania incluye algunos de los temas más trascendentales de la salsa. Canciones como "Pablo Pueblo", "Tiburón" y la legendaria "Pedro Navaja" son sumamente bailables, pero también ocupan un lugar de honor dentro de la historia de la música tropical: el cancionero de Blades representa la emancipación de la salsa - su madurez como un género latino de ilimitada imaginación, capaz de hacer bailar y pensar al mismo tiempo. En otra época y un lugar distinto, Blades podría haber sido un rockero intelectual o un trovador revolucionario. ¿Fue el destino que decidió su nacimiento en Panamá y su traslado a la ciudad de Nueva York durante los años '70? Independientemente del sendero elegido, no hay duda de que Blades sigue ocupando un lugar privilegiado al lado de gigantes de la música latina como el cubano Silvio Rodríguez, el brasileño Milton Nascimento y el catalán Joan Manuel Serrat. Que la salsa fuera su género de elección terminó siendo una bendición para la música tropical. Los temas de esta compilación marcan un antes y un después para la salsa. Nada sería igual después del triunfo artístico y comercial del panameño durante los finales de los '70 y principios de los '80. Junto al cantante Héctor Lavoe y el trombonista, compositor y productor Willie Colón, Blades formó una especie de Santísima Trinidad del género afrocaribeño. Lavoe era la voz. Colón, el alquimista. Blades, el poeta de conciencia social, creador de letras que inspiraron a generaciones de latinos. "La gente se aprende las letras de las canciones, en una época en la que no se lee poesía", dijo Blades durante una entrevista llevada a cabo hace algunos años en su casa de Los Angeles. "Sin tener pretensiones literarias, le di a la gente poemas de unas seis estrofas que ofrecen imágenes reconocibles. Creo que de ahí proviene su aceptación". Blades alcanzó su plenitud artística con los excelentes discos que grabó para la disquera Elektra en la segunda mitad de los años '80. Durante los '90 y el nuevo milenio, se convirtió en un músico verdaderamente multicultural, creando un híbrido ecléctico de música latina en importantes grabaciones como Amor y Control (1992) y Mundo (2002). Pese a mantenerse ocupado trabajando en política y como actor de cine, el cantante no ha parado de grabar música. Es indudable que los próximos discos de Blades seguirán sorprendiendo y deleitando a sus fanáticos. Esta compilación se concentra en los años posteriores a la explosión salsera de los '70, cuando Blades se convirtió rápidamente en una de las estrellas más grandes del género. La música de estos dos discos muestra la promesa de un cantautor que recién comenzaba a brillar. Los discos que Blades grabó para la Fania son consideradas hasta el día de hoy como las joyas más únicas y adictivas dentro de la ilustre historia de la disquera. Descarga Caliente Nacido en 1948, Blades viajó a Nueva York en 1969, donde grabó su disco debut con la ayuda del productor Pancho Cristal. Titulada De Panamá A Nueva York, la sesión se grabó con la orquesta del maestro del boogaloo Pete Rodríguez. El disco no fue exitoso, pero el joven Blades pudo escucharse en la radio por primera vez cuando "Descarga Caliente" fue transmitida por la radio colombiana. Canto Abacuá En 1974, Blades regresó a los Estados Unidos, y eventualmente se mudó a Nueva York, consiguiendo un trabajo como ayudante en la sala de correos de la Fania. Rápidamente comenzó a ubicar sus composiciones con algunos de los grandes artistas de la disquera, y cantó con la orquesta de Ray Barretto. Este extenso tema de su autoría fue incluido en el disco Barretto! El Cazangero Perteneciente al LP de Willie Colón de The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1975), "El Cazangero" es la primera canción que suena como un auténtico clásico de Rubén Blades. Apoyado por el sonido aterciopelado de Colón, el tema es una seductora mezcla de ritmos brasileños, una cadenciosa sección de vientos y la voz de Blades, llena de nostalgia. Pablo Pueblo En sólo un par de años, Blades floreció como compositor e intérprete. Su trabajo se benefició de su asociación con Colón, recién salido de la orquesta que compartía con Héctor Lavoe. El primer disco del dúo, Metiendo Mano, abre con el primer intento serio del cantante de comunicar un mensaje social. La letra, sobre la vida de un hombre de clase obrera que cae víctima de la corrupción e indiferencia institucionalizada de los países latinoamericanos, es desgarradora. El sofisticado acompañamiento musical está lleno de climas majestuosos. Juan Pachanga Los finales de los '70 fueron una época de actividad afiebrada para Blades. Pese a que los ejecutivos de la Fania tuvieron dudas en cuanto a promover sus canciones, alegando que "a nadie le gusta escuchar letras deprimentes", pronto se dieron cuenta de que la estética salsera de Blades tenía un potencial de ventas inmenso. El cantante se convirtió en uno de los artistas más comerciales de la disquera, y por lo tanto fue invitado a participar en las grabaciones de la famosa Fania All Stars. Incluido en el LP de 1977 Rhythm Machine, "Juan Pachanga" cuenta con un formidable arreglo de Louie Ramírez y una emotiva letra sobre un parrandero con el corazón roto. No se pierda el solo de teclados de Papo Lucca - uno de los pianistas más admirados por Blades y líder de la célebre Sonora Ponceña. Paula C Un fastuoso tema autobiográfico sobre la ruptura de la primera relación romántica de Blades. Una vez más, la influencia de la música brasileña (quizás el género predilecto de Rubén), le agrega variedad a la canción. Plástico Uno de los trucos más brillantes de Rubén como compositor: una decadente introducción de música disco que se transforma en ritmo afrocubano y una virulenta denuncia de la gente superficial y sus muchos prejuicios. ¿Quién puede olvidar el final, con su llamado a la unidad latinoamericana y el grito de todos los países del continente? "Plástico" es el tema de apertura de Siembra, el éxito masivo de 1978 que mejor representó la mancuerna Blades/Colón. Durante muchos años, fue el disco más vendido en la historia de la salsa. Siembra contiene siete canciones inmortales, incluyendo el desopilante "solo de boca" de "Buscando Guayaba" y la hipnótica melodía de "Dime". También, por supuesto, la magia de "Pedro Navaja". Pedro Navaja ¿Quién dice que no hay espacio para la literatura en la salsa? Combinando a Bertolt Brecht con Franz Kafka y el folklore del barrio, Blades narra el macabro encuentro entre una prostituta sanguinaria y el famoso criminal del título, concluyendo con el famoso coro: la vida te da sorpresas/sorpresas te da la vida, ay Dios. Junto con "El Cantante" de Lavoe (también escrita por Blades), "Pedro Navaja" es el himno salsero por excelencia. "Cuando la escucharon por primera vez, los ejecutivos de la disquera me dijeron que no servía", recuerda Blades con una sonrisa. "Que era demasiado larga, que la letra era demasiado complicada y que la gente sólo quería divertirse. Nunca llegaron a entender el por qué de su éxito". Manuela En 1980, Blades lanzó el proyecto más ambicioso de toda su carrera: un LP doble titulado Maestra Vida. Su trama agridulce se enfocaba en una historia de amor que dura toda una vida, agregando un sentido comentario sobre el interminable carnaval de la realidad latinoamericana. Enriquecida con la presencia de una orquesta sinfónica, la producción de Colón es apropiadamente suntuosa, pero las canciones en sí no pudieron alcanzar el poder melódico de Siembra. Dicho esto, Maestra Vida es uno de los proyectos más idiosincráticos del género afrocubano. Desde entonces, Blades ha hablado sobre la posibilidad de grabar la tercera y última parte de la saga. Tiburón Con renovado vigor, Blades y Colón volvieron en 1981 con Canciones del Solar de los Aburridos. Después, el dúo colaboraría en la banda sonora de la película fallida The Last Fight, y se reuniría en 1995 para Tras La Tormenta - un disco que los encontró grabando sus supuestos dúos en estudios separados. Canciones sería su última obra maestra juntos. "Para mí es increíble que nuestra colaboración haya durado tanto", Willie Colón comentó durante una entrevista. "No había espacio en el mismo cuarto para dos egos de semejante tamaño". El tema de apertura de Canciones, "Tiburón" es una brutal metáfora política sobre la relación entre los Estados Unidos y Latinoamérica, motivando a algunos escuchas a malinterpretar a Blades como un fanático de la izquierda. El arreglo de Colón es perfecto, y los efectos sonoros le agregan textura a esta joya tropical, interpretada recientemente por Vicentico, ex cantante del grupo de rock latino Fabulosos Cadillacs. Ligia Elena También proveniente de Canciones, "Ligia Elena" ilustra el talento de Blades para crear narrativas rebosantes de romance y humor. La historia de una joven de buena familia que se escapa con un trompetista pobre, suscitando la envidia de otras bellezas aristocráticas, es interpretada con carisma por Rubén - apoyado por el hilarante coro de Rubén y Willie juntos. Una canción humorística que continúa la denuncia de racismo y prejuicio social de la sociedad latinoamericana. Décadas después de su lanzamiento, no ha perdido su vigencia. No Hay Chance En 1984, Blades comenzó un emocionante capítulo en su carrera al abandonar su orquesta a cambio de un sexteto con aroma de jazz (Seis del Solar, liderado con virtuosismo por el tecladista Oscar Hernández). Firmó con Elektra Records y lanzó Buscando América, un disco excepcional. Pero le seguía debiendo música a la Fania, que eventualmente vio la luz del día sin la supervisión del cantante. El disco de 1986 Doble Filo, del cual provienen los últimos tres temas de esta antología, fue uno de estos lanzamientos. "Esos fueron unos discos que los desbarataron totalmente", Blades dijo en 1995. "Les sacaron el vibráfono y los saxofones, agregaron trombones, quitaron los créditos de los músicos y cambiaron la secuencia de las canciones y los títulos de los discos". Sin embargo, hay mucho para disfrutar en este tema típicamente salsoso sobre un hombre que se niega a perdonar a la mujer que lo dejó - ideal para todos los que piensan que Blades canta solamente letras serias. Mi Jibarita Blades tiene gratos recuerdos de esta humilde canción compuesta por David Martínez. Es parte de la ola de temas que presentaron una visión romántica e idealizada de la vida campestre en Latinoamérica. "Mi Jibarita" narra la historia de un hombre que ha dejado atrás el nerviosismo de la ciudad, retirándose al campo con una belleza curvilínea. Gran parte de la narrativa es presentada por el coro. Cuando la voz de Blades aparece, su soneo es impactante. El Cantante Durante sus años con la Fania, Blades se distanció de aquellos colegas que estaban metidos seriamente en temas de drogas. Blades ha dicho en varias oportunidades que pese a no ser un amigo cercano de Héctor Lavoe, siempre sintió una gran admiración por él. Esto lo demostró en 1978, cuando decidió darle a Héctor el tema "El Cantante" - que originalmente había escrito con la idea de cantarlo él mismo. Gracias a la interpretación de Lavoe y la producción estilizada de Colón, el tema se convirtió en el himno por excelencia de Héctor. La versión del propio Blades es más liviana, pero tiene un swing impecable, además del reconocido sentido del humor de Rubén. Blades será recordado como el poeta más importante de la salsa, pero también es un sonero en el mismo nivel que Beny Moré, Cheo Feliciano o Ismael Rivera. "El Cantante" en su versión menos conocida es un final perfecto para esta antología de momentos clásicos del cancionero de Rubén Blades. Escrito por ERNESTO LECHNER