s

Sonora Poncena

A Band and Its Music

$1.29

Sonora Poncena

A Band and Its Music

$18.99 Album
$18.99 Album
$18.99 Album
Hecheros Pa' Un Palo
Fuego En El 23
Acere Ko
Prende El Fogón
Juana Bayona
Ñáñara Caí
Bomba Carambomba
El Pío Pío
Boranda
Noche Como Boca E' Lobo
Omelé
Hasta Que Se Rompa El Cuero
Moreno Soy
Canto Al Amor
Suena El Piano
Soy Antillana
Ahora Si
Timbalero
Night In Tunisia
Mi Lindo Yambú
Luz Negra
Borinquen
Remembranza
Ramona
Canción
Franqueza Cruel
Fea

If you are already familiar with the magic of La Sonora Ponceña, then you know what this compilation has in store for you: over the span of 27 tracks, we have distilled the very essence of one of the jazziest, funkiest and most elegant orchestras ever to grace the landscape of Afro-Caribbean music. If, on the other hand, you are mostly unfamiliar with La Ponceña's brand of Puerto Rican salsa, and decided to purchase this set to see what the band is all about, then you are in for an unforgettable treat - a life changing experience. Other salsa stars managed to capture the imagination of the mainstream: Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Héctor Lavoe and Rubén Blades are the first that come to mind. By contrast, La Ponceña has remained a bit of a hidden secret among Latin music aficionados. Not the band itself, because La Ponceña has been enjoying massive dance hits since 1968, but rather the fact that this unpretentious orchestra is responsible for a series of timeless albums that go beyond the conventions of tropical music. La Ponceña's discography is deep and transcendental. Sociopolitically alert and sonically experimental. Eager to absorb other influences and stubbornly sophisticated. No matter how much acclaim it continues to receive by salsa dancers and the specialized press, La Ponceña is still, at its core, an underrated band. The beginning was certainly unassuming. In 1944, Enrique 'Quique' Lucca Caraballo formed a little band in the city of Ponce, in the Southern coast of Puerto Rico. Its name was Orquesta Internacional, and it performed in local functions and parties without achieving the kind of artistic pedigree that Don Quique was hoping for. Ten years later, it was renamed La Sonora Ponceña, its sound enhanced, devoted to the zesty dance numbers of Cuban artists like Arsenio Rodríguez and La Sonora Matancera. The band would probably have remained anonymous, if it wasn't for the leader's son, Enrique Arsenio. Born in 1946 and nicknamed 'Papo,' he was a child prodigy who grew up listening to his father's orchestra and developed an uncanny ability to perform the piano. Like many salsa musicians, Papo was equally enamored with the Afro-Cuban music of the Caribbean and the jazz soundscapes of performers like Oscar Peterson and Bill Evans. This sweet dichotomy would define La Ponceña's excellence for decades to come. By the time the orchestra released its debut album on the label Inca Records in 1968, Papo was La Ponceña's musical director and arranger. Inca would become part of the Fania conglomerate, and the band enjoyed international distribution during the New York salsa explosion of the '70s. The timing couldn't have been more auspicious, and Papo eventually replaced Larry Harlow as the official piano player with mega-orchestra Fania All Stars. His piano solos - velvety, complex, endlessly fascinating - would remain at the core of La Ponceña's identity. But the Luccas were also incredibly astute when it came to enlisting lead vocalists. Tito Gómez, Luigi Texidor, Miguelito Ortiz and Yolanda Rivera are a few of the genre-defining soneros than can be heard on this compilation. La Ponceña's trajectory can be divided into three distinct stages. The first one spans the years from 1968 to 1975. The band's early albums favor a tough, rugged sound. Compared to the other seminal groups of the time, Lucca's arrangements lack the exuberance of Willie Colón's trombone lineup, or the lush dynamics of Eddie Palmieri's La Perfecta. They are almost austere, implacable in their rhythmic intensity, using the sound of trumpets to evoke the bravado of an old fashioned Hollywood epic. The early hits ("Hachero Pa'Un Palo," "Fuego En El 23") are salsified renditions of Arsenio Rodríguez standards. Recorded in 1971, "Acere Ko" is a crisp, airy version of a joyful rumbón written by Patato and Totico. And the opening track off the now classic Desde Puerto Rico A Nueva York LP, "Prende El Fogón" solidifies the quintessential Sonora Ponceña sound: the arrangement glides like a beautiful couple skating on ice. An inspired Tito Gómez introduces Papo's latest concoction, piano al horno ("baked piano") and the contrast between the bandleader's refined solo and the ensemble's ferocious rhythm section is memorable. The explosion that follows, all staccato cowbell punch and spiraling trumpet riffs, has been sending salsa dancers into a frenzy for decades. The best was still to come. Between 1976 and 1979, La Ponceña released five albums of a new tropical style that can be best summed up as "progressive salsa." Lucca was clearly aware of the progressive rock albums that were coming out of England at the time, and there are touches of psychedelia, space-rock, electronic keyboards and sound effects on the new works. The musty Cuban bolero "Soy Tan Feliz" becomes a jazz-rock fusion gem thanks to Papo's electronic piano, and La Ponceña discovers Brazilian music by turning Edu Lobo's bossa nova tune "Boranda" into a seven minute-long epic, and splitting up "Bomba Carambomba" right in the middle with a samba beat ("ahora es bossa nova para variar un poquito," enthuses Texidor.) Two years later, Tito Gómez's gritty delivery on "Soy Moreno" is enriched with a solo that sounds straight out of Chick Corea's Return To Forever records. It was Conquista Musical in 1976 that ushered the new era with a more polished sheen, courtesy of co-producer Louie Ramírez. The piano solos are more extensive, fully developed, and the opening "Ñáñara Caí" blends a placid melody with a hilarious narrative describing a world that's gone upside down - we even hear about Fania co-founder Johnny Pacheco being run over by a cow. Conquista left space for a mega-hit, the hummable "El Pío Pío," an idyllic view of life in the Puerto Rican countryside and Papo's stylized take on what a pop single should sound like. A strategy that he would repeat with equal success on the Yolanda Rivera-penned "Canto Al Amor." This second stage came to an end in 1979 with La Ceiba, an album recorded in collaboration with the Queen of salsa herself, Celia Cruz. Interestingly enough, the LP failed the ignite the same kind of violent combustion that La Ponceña had already achieved with its own diva, Yolanda Rivera. But La Ceiba gave further proof of the orchestra's privileged position within salsa royalty. The third and final stage of La Ponceña's aesthetic evolution begins in 1980 with the album New Heights. Mirroring the conceptual tendency of many heavy metal and hard rock bands of the time, the cover art on all future Ponceña albums depicts imagery inspired from the world of fantasy literature: muscular warriors and distant planets, flying horses and science fiction laser cannons. New Heights begins with yet another hit, "Ahora Sí," a modernized rendition of the old Machito guaracha "Yo Soy La Rumba." The sound is a bit more relaxed now, a perfect combination between creamy smoothness and the old percussive force. Inside, a new innovation: Papo grabs Dizzy Gillespie's "Night In Tunisia" in his expert boricua hands and turns it into the Latin jazz equivalent of a chocolate bonbon - a precious musical miniature with a remarkable attention to detail and an exquisite piano workout. In Puerto Rico, people began paying attention. Many fans discovered the beauty of Latin jazz thanks to La Ponceña. Other instrumentals would follow: "Nica's Dream," "Woody's Blue," "Satin 'N' Lace." At this point, Papo must have realized that he was responsible for one of Latin music's grandest bands. His confidence now at a peak level, he experimented with boldness and grace. Throughout the '80s and '90s, each successive Ponceña album yielded fresh new discoveries: adaptations of contemporary Cuban songs by illustrious but underrated composers such as Adalberto Alvarez and Pablo Milanés; salsified translations of Anglo hits; extended tributes to legends of the Afro-Caribbean past. 1980's Unchained Force distilled the band's devotion to its native Puerto Rico on the rapturous "Borinquen" - a melody that borrows the stately majesty of the island's folklore, complemented by Yolanda's chocolaty delivery, choked up with emotion. Our compilation ends in 1998, with "Fea," a huge hit from the On Target album. Since then, La Ponceña has survived the advent of reggaetón, as well as the bastardization of tropical music by pasteurized Latin pop. Lucca took the band's direction into his hands by opening his own label, Pianissimo Records, and releasing new studio albums and concert recordings of excellent quality. When not touring the rest of the world, the band performs regularly all over Puerto Rico. The band's current gigs can be a bit frustrating to longtime fans, since it is just impossible to fit all of the group's major hits into one single evening of live music. But the fire is there, and Papo's piano sounds today as pristine and eloquent as ever. If anything, La Ponceña's body of work demonstrates that salsa is much more than just great dance music. A kaleidoscope of extreme emotions, its beauty touches the soul in the most unexpected and profound ways ERNESTO LECHNER-- Many thanks to Papo Lucca, Michael Rucker, Rudy Mangual, Sandra Lechner and Vivian Mancilla for their assistance in compiling this collection.LA SONORA PONCEÑA: A BAND AND Their MUSIC Si usted ya conoce la magia de la Sonora Ponceña, entonces sabe lo que contiene esta colección: dos discos con la esencia misma de una de las orquestas más elegantes y llenas de swing en el panorama de la música afrocaribeña. Si, por otro lado, todavía no está familiarizado con la salsa puertorriqueña de la Ponceña y decidió comprar esta antología para conocer un poco mejor a esta banda, lo espera una experiencia inolvidable - un descubrimiento de aquellos que cambian la vida para siempre. Otras estrellas de la salsa lograron seducir a un público masivo: Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Héctor Lavoe y Rubén Blades son algunos. La Ponceña es algo así como un tesoro escondido para muchos aficionados de la música latina. No la banda en sí, considerando que viene amasando un catálogo impresionante de éxitos desde 1968, sino más bien el hecho de que esta orquesta para nada pretenciosa es responsible de una serie de discos que van más allá de las convenciones y las expectativas de la música tropical. La discografía de la Ponceña es profunda y trascendental. Alerta en temas sociopolíticos y experimental en lo sonoro. Ansiosa por absorber influencias externas y obstinadamente sofisticada. No importa cuánto la celebren los bailadores y la prensa especializada. La Ponceña es, en realidad, una banda subestimada. Sus comienzos fueron humildes. En 1944, Enrique 'Quique' Lucca Caraballo formó un conjunto en la ciudad de Ponce, al sur de Puerto Rico. Su nombre era Orquesta Internacional y se presentaba en eventos y fiestas locales sin conseguir la consagración artística con la que soñaba Don Quique. Diez años más tarde, su nuevo nombre fue la Sonora Ponceña y su sonido renovado, dedicado a la fogosa música bailable de artistas cubanos como Arsenio Rodríguez y la Sonora Matancera. Probablemente hubiera permanecido en el anonimato, si no fuera por el hijo de su director, Enrique Arsenio. Nacido en 1946, 'Papo' era un niño prodigio que se crió escuchando a la orquesta de su padre y desarrolló una habilidad extraordinaria para tocar el piano. Como muchos músicos de la salsa, Papo se enamoró con igual pasión de la música afrocubana del Caribe y del jazz estadounidense cultivado por artistas como Oscar Peterson y Bill Evans. Esta dulce dicotomía definiría la estética de la Ponceña durante las siguientes décadas. En 1968, la orquesta lanzó su primer disco con la compañía Inca. Papo era su director musical y arreglista. Inca sería parte del imperio de la Fania, y a través de este arreglo, la banda consiguió distribución internacional durante la explosión salsosa de los '70 en Nueva York. El momento no podría haber sido más estratégico y eventualmente Papo reemplazó a Larry Harlow como el pianista de la Fania All Stars. Sus solos - aterciopelados, complejos, fascinantes - formarían la identidad misma de la Ponceña. Pero los Lucca eran muy astutos cuando se trataba de contratar cantantes. Tito Gómez, Luigi Texidor, Miguelito Ortiz y Yolanda Rivera son algunos de los legendarios soneros que aparecen en esta compilación. La trayectoria de la Ponceña se divide en tres etapas. La primera abarca los años entre 1968 y 1975. Los primeros discos favorecen un sonido duro y aguerrido. Comparados a otros grupos del momento, los arreglos de Lucca no tienen la exuberancia del conjunto con trombones de Willie Colón, o la suntuosidad de Eddie Palmieri y La Perfecta. Son austeros, implacables en su intensidad rítmica, utilizando el sonido de las trompetas para evocar el drama épico de una película hollywoodense. Los éxitos tempraneros de la banda ("Hachero Pa'Un Palo", "Fuego En El 23") son lecturas salsificadas de temas de Arsenio Rodríguez. Grabado en 1971, "Acere Ko" es una ágil versión de un alegre rumbón compuesto por Patato y Totico. Y el tema de apertura del clásico LP Desde Puerto Rico A Nueva York, "Prende El Fogón" solidifica el sonido característico de la banda: el arreglo se desliza como una bella pareja patinando sobre hielo. Un inspirado Tito Gómez introduce una nueva invención de Papo, "piano al horno", y el contraste entre el solo refinado del tecladista y la ferocidad de la sección de ritmo es memorable. La consiguiente explosión de sabor, con golpes de campana y la electricidad de los metales, ha delirado a bailadores durante décadas. Todavía faltaba lo mejor. Entre 1976 y 1979, la Ponceña lanzó cinco discos de un nuevo estilo tropical que podría caracterizarse como "salsa progresiva". Lucca estaba al tanto de los discos de rock progresivo que salían de Inglaterra en esa época, y hay momentos de psicodelia, rock espacial, teclados electrónicos y efectos sonoros en las grabaciones de la banda. De esta manera, el bolero cubano "Soy Tan Feliz" se transforma en una joya de jazz-rock con el piano electrónico de Papo. La Ponceña descubre la música brasileña transformando la bossa nova "Boranda" de Edu Lobo en una epopeya salsera de siete minutos de duración y partiendo a "Bomba Carambomba" por la mitad con un ritmo de samba ("ahora es bossa nova para variar un poquito," exclama Texidor). Dos años más tarde, la interpretación desafiante de Tito Gómez en "Soy Moreno" se enriquece con un solo que parece salido de un disco de Chick Corea y Return To Forever. Fue Conquista Musical que introdujo la nueva era en 1976 con un sonido más pulido, cortesía del productor Louie Ramírez. Los solos de piano son extensos, plenamente desarrollados y el tema de apertura "Ñáñara Caí" combina una melodía plácida con una desopilante narrativa que describe un mundo al revés - inclusive describe cómo una vaca choca con [Johnny] Pacheco, co-fundador de la Fania. Conquista incluye un éxito radial, "El Pío Pío", visión idílica de la vida en la campiña puertorriqueña y la visión estilizada de una canción pop al estilo de Papo. Estrategia que repitiría con éxito en el tema de Yolanda Rivera "Canto Al Amor". Esta segunda etapa concluyó en 1979 con La Ceiba, un disco grabado con la Reina de la Salsa, Celia Cruz. Curiosamente, el disco no logró encender el mismo tipo de fuego musical que la banda había creado con su propia diva, Yolanda Rivera. Pero La Ceiba demostró la posición privilegiada que la orquesta ocupaba ya dentro de la salsa. La tercera y última etapa en la evolución estética de la Ponceña comienza en 1980 con el disco New Heights. Reflejando la tendencia conceptual de muchas bandas de heavy metal y hard rock del momento, la portada de los discos siguientes del grupo muestra imágenes inspiradas en el mundo de la literatura fantástica: guerreros musculosos y planetas distantes, caballos alados y armas futuristas de la ciencia ficción. New Heights comienza con un nuevo éxito, "Ahora Sí", una versión modernizada de la guaracha de Machito "Yo Soy La Rumba". El sonido es más fluido, combinación perfecta entre la ligereza estética de la época y la vieja fuerza rítmica. Dentro del disco, una nueva innovación: Papo toma "Night In Tunisia" de Dizzy Gillespie en sus experimentadas manos boricuas y lo transforma en el equivalente jazzero de un bombón de chocolate con su notable atención al detalle y un exquisito trabajo pianístico. En Puerto Rico, la gente empezó a prestar atención. Muchos melómanos descubrieron la belleza del jazz latino gracias a la Ponceña. Le seguirían otros instrumentales similares: "Nica's Dream", "Woody's Blue", "Satin 'N' Lace". A esta altura, Papo debe haber concientizado que lideraba una de las orquestas más importantes de la música latina. Teniendo plena confianza en su creatividad, experimentó con temple y audacia. A través de los '80 y los '90, cada nuevo disco de la banda presentó innovaciones: adaptaciones de canciones cubanos contemporáneas de compositores ilustres como Adalberto Alvarez y Pablo Milanés; traducciones salsificadas de éxitos en inglés; extensos tributos a las leyendas del pasado afrocaribeño. En 1980, Unchained Force expresó la devoción de los músicos a su Puerto Rico natal con "Borinquen" - la melodía inspirada en la majestuosidad del folklore de la isla, complementada por la voz chocolatosa de Yolanda, ahogada por la emoción. Nuestra compilación termina en 1998 con "Fea", un éxito del disco On Target. Desde entonces, la Ponceña sobrevivió la moda del reggaetón, así como la degeneración de la música tropical en manos del pop latino pasteurizado. Lucca tomó control de su orquesta abriendo su propia disquera, Pianissimo Records, lanzando nuevos discos y grabaciones en concierto de excelente calidad. Cuando no está de gira a través del mundo, la banda se presenta constantemente en Puerto Rico. Ver a la orquesta en vivo puede ser frustrante para sus admiradores, dado que es imposible que interpreten todos sus éxitos en una sola noche. Pero el fuego sigue intacto y el piano de Papo suena más cristalino y elocuente que nunca. La obra de la Ponceña demuestra que la salsa es mucho más que una música bailable. Ofrece, en realidad, un caleidoscopio de emociones extremas. Su belleza toca el alma de las maneras más profundas e inesperadas. ERNESTO LECHNER-- Muchas gracias a Papo Lucca, Michael Rucker, Rudy Mangual, Sandra Lechner y Vivian Mancilla por su asistencia en la realización de esta antología musical.